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Reduction in Child Benefit Since 2008

November 15, 2014 Leave a comment

     Fianna Fáil, Fine Gael and Labour Made Huge Reductions in Child Benefit Since 2008

These reductions applied equally to households  of the unemployed and to households with huge incomes.  For example, an unemployed parent with 3 children lost 1416 Euro per year from 2008 to 2015.Bigger families suffered disproportionately higher losses. This is cruel, uncivilised and anti-human behaviour by these parties. As can be seen in my post on this blog-Irish Super-rich Awash with Money-the top 10,000 income tax payers have average annual incomes declared to revenue of 595,000Euro  each. They wouldn’t notice a reduction of 1416 euro!

                        

                                Budget          Gross Payment per month

 No of Children  2008       2011   2012      2015    Total Drop/month

1                                160         140         140      135                   25

2                               320          280        280    270                    50

3                                523         447        428     405                  118

4                                726         624       588      540                   186

5                                909       801          748     675                   234

Total drop per year  2015-2008

No Of Children

 1                                                300

2                                                 600

3                                                1416

                                                2232

5                                                 2808

 

 

Drop under Labour/FG 2011-2015 (Minister Joan Burton,now Labour Party Leader)

No of Children                                Per Month                      per year

1                                                                   5                                   60

2                                                                 10                                120

3                                                                    42                                 504

4                                                                   84                                1008

5                                                                    126                              1512

 

Drop under Fianna Fáil/Green  2011-2008  

     No of Children                      Per month                per year

 1                                                   20                                       240

2                                                  20                                       480

3                                                  76                                        912

4                                                  102                                     1224

5                                                 108                                     1296

 

Categories: Uncategorized

Tax Evasion by the Irish Super-Rich (With Assistance of Government)

November 13, 2014 1 comment

Fairer Tax Choices in Budget 2019 Were Possible-Social Justice Ireland

https://www.socialjustice.ie/sites/default/files/attach/publication/5500/budget2019analysisfinaled.pdf?cs=true

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Government:Increase in Fuel Tax will be in NEXT BUDGET But EXTRA PUBLIC TRANSPORT and REFUND are but politicians promises!! https://wp.me/pKzXa-oM

Necessary Anti-Climate Change Action to Be Dumped on Workers and The Poor As Petrol And Diesel to Be Increased in Budget

But Income Tax Relief for those on Huge Incomes to be Continued says Paschal Donohoe

Irish Independent:  ‘We want to force private motorists out of their cars’

Minister Shane Ross targets drivers..

Ross Represents Dublin-Rathdown one of the wealthiest Constituencies in the Country. It is serviced by Dublin Bus and Luas. A short drive  reaches DART and Mainline Train services

 The Irish Super-Rich, AWASH with Money, should be taxed to pay for FREE and Accessible Public Transport  Everywhere in Ireland

Irish Independent:  ‘We want to force private motorists out of their cars’

Ross targets drivers as public transport and electric cars at centre of climate emergency strategy

Irish Independent June 18,2019

Motorists are to be forced from their cars under a plan the Government says is necessary to avoid a “climate apocalypse”.

A revolution in transport is planned over the next decade, with Transport Minister Shane Ross saying the policy is “to get people out of private cars because they are the biggest offenders for emissions”.n Doyle breaks down the main points of Climate Action Plan 2019

The excise duty on diesel is to be hiked, while all fossil fuels will be repeatedly slapped with increases in carbon taxes. As an alternative to using private cars, the Climate Action Plan commits the Government to investing in public transport and cycling infrastructure.

For those who insist on having a car, the plan is to make electric vehicles (EVs) the only viable option. There are currently fewer than 5,000 EVs in Ireland – but this figure is set to rise to one million over the next decade.

Meanwhile, the Irish Independent understands the head of the Government’s Climate Change Advisory Council (CCAC) will today call for carbon tax to be increased to at least €35 per tonne in the next Budget.

This would immediately push the price of petrol and diesel up by around 4pc. The expectation is that Finance Minister Paschal Donohoe will hike the current €20 tax by €10. ..Irish Independent

The Electoral Amendment Act 2017   defines the Dublin-Rathdown constituency as:[4]

“In the county of Dún Laoghaire–Rathdown the electoral divisions of:

Ballinteer-Broadford, Ballinteer-Ludford, Ballinteer-Marley, Ballinteer-Meadowbroads, Ballinteer-Meadowmount, Ballinteer-Woodpark, Churchtown-Castle, Churchtown-Landscape, Churchtown-Nutgrove, Churchtown-Orwell, Churchtown-Woodlawn, Clonskeagh-Belfield, Clonskeagh-Farranboley, Clonskeagh-Milltown, Clonskeagh-Roebuck, Clonskeagh-Windy Arbour, Dundrum-Balally, Dundrum-Kilmacud, Dundrum-Sandyford, Dundrum-Sweetmount, Dundrum-Taney, Stillorgan-Deerpark, Stillorgan-Kilmacud, Stillorgan-Merville, Stillorgan-Mount Merrion, Tibradden;

and the electoral division of Glencullen except for that part that is in the constituency of Dún Laoghaire.”

 

In addition to service by Dublin Bus, there are a number of Luas (tram) Stops in the constituency. Dart and Mainline Train stations are a short drive away.

————————————————–Poor Subsidising The Rich Through Tax Reliefs-Social Justice Ireland

Or in plain English: Tax reliefs lead to those at the bottom subsidising the investments and savings of those at the top    https://wp.me/pKzXa-oM

Irish Examiner   Wednesday, June 12, 2019

https://www.irishexaminer.com/breakingnews/views/analysis/tax-reliefs-mean-the-poor-subsidise-the-savings-of-the-rich-930150.html

It is important that tax reliefs — particularly the costliest ones — are scrutinised and that there is proper parliamentary debate to ensure they remain cost-effective and fit for purpose, writes Eamon Murphy.

Given where the discussion is on the need for tax reform internationally, it is critical that Ireland review its approach to tax reliefs.

Tax reliefs — or tax expenditures, as they are often known — are policy tools for reducing an individual’s or firm’s tax liability, usually with the goal of encouraging certain behaviours.

They are often politically appealing as they don’t increase direct government expenditure and there is little extra administrative burden.

All this sounds so wonderful that it is usually overlooked that these tax reliefs represent revenue foregone by the government, so there is always a cost attached.

In 2016, tax reliefs amounted to approximately 10% of total tax revenue.

This is a huge amount of money. However, unlike direct government spending, tax reliefs are not subject to annual assessment as part of the budgetary process. It is extraordinary that this is the case given the costs involved.

Additionally problematic is the fact that, by their very nature, tax reliefs are regressive. Because they result in government raising less money, this funding needs to be made up elsewhere or services and spending must be cut.

These costs are spread among all taxpayers — by which we basically mean all Irish residents, as everyone pays tax of some kind — but not everyone can benefit from them, and naturally it is those with the greatest income that are best placed to avail of them.

For this reason, tax reliefs are a departure from the equity principle of taxation, as they typically benefit high earners to a much greater extent than lower earners.

They have even been acknowledged to be regressive by the government’s own Commission on Taxation, which has asserted that, “to the extent that the beneficiaries of tax expenditures are those with higher incomes or substantial capital, this results in a transfer of financial resources to these beneficiaries by the rest of the taxpaying community, including those on low income”.

Or in plain English: Tax reliefs lead to those at the bottom subsidising the investments and savings of those at the top. Among the more perverse examples of this are the reliefs for private pension savings, and those related to research and development (R&D) in the corporate sector.

The Government incentivises people to invest in private pensions using tax reliefs which employees receive at source. Many workers on middle incomes benefit, but overall the system is extremely regressive.

Higher earners receive the benefit at double the rate that lower earners receive, and more than 70% of the money goes to people in the top 20% of earners.

In fact research suggests that only small fractions of the amounts saved in pension schemes represent “new” savings, which means these reliefs — which cost hundreds of millions of euro every year — are an expensive means of supplementing saving that would take place anyway, particularly for high earners.

It makes sense to encourage firms to invest in R&D, particularly as scientific R&D often has beneficial spill-over effects for the rest of the economy.

Yet the Government’s own Economic and Evaluation Service estimates that about 40% of the Government’s expenditure in this area is dead weight, i.e. money spent on research that would be conducted anyway. The R&D credit costs taxpayers more than half a billion euro a year, on average.

For these reasons, and others, it is important that tax reliefs — particularly the costliest ones — are scrutinised and that there is proper parliamentary debate to ensure they remain cost-effective and fit for purpose.

Social Justice Ireland believes that as part of the budgetary process, the cost of tax reliefs (by type) for each past year should be published, as should the estimated cost of tax reliefs for the year ahead.

Furthermore, when considering whether to implement a proposed tax relief, the Government should be obliged to state publicly:

  • The objective it aims to achieve;
  • Other options considered and why the tax relief is deemed to be the best approach;
  • Likely economic impact of the tax relief;
  • Estimated cost.

Most importantly, there should be a sunset clause on all tax reliefs so they expire and require proactive renewal, rather than being allowed to drift indefinitely. This ensures policy is periodically reviewed, and the continuation of the policy must be publicly justified by the finance minister.

Even the European Commission has called for a limit to the scope and number of Ireland’s tax reliefs.

They are essentially financial subsidies from the taxpayer to the beneficiary and require higher taxes among everyone else to make up the difference. Implementation of the recommendations above should be the very least Irish taxpayers can expect.

Eamon Murphy is economic and social analyst at Social Justice Ireland.


Budget 2020 must be Economically Sound and Socially Fair- Fr Sean Healy Social Justice Ireland

Most Irish people want to see an end to homelessness, social housing shortages, hospital waiting lists and child poverty. They want to see the lack of affordable childcare addressed, investment in rural broadband, progress on our climate commitments and much more. These should be the priority targets of Budget 2020.

In our latest Policy Briefing, entitled Budget Choices, Social Justice Ireland points to the need for increased investment in the necessary services and infrastructure that a vibrant economy requires.  To deliver increased levels of investment a modest increase in the overall tax take is required.  Good governance and sustainable choices on the economy, the environment and society are essential to delivering a Budget that is economically sound and socially fair.

The Briefing goes on to argue that we need the political courage to say that Ireland is a low tax economy that needs to raise new revenue to fund vital social infrastructure.  This is essential to meet the challenges we currently face in housing and healthcare for example, but also to ensure we are ready to face the potentially damaging fallout from Brexit, and changes to the international corporate taxation system.

Social Justice Ireland’s Budget Choices for 2020 are based on the values that have delivered for the most progressive and equal societies around the world.  Our choices promote the common good and a fair, vibrant and sustainable Ireland.  Social Justice Ireland is proposing a modest increase in the overall tax take, to fund the infrastructure and services we so badly need, and to move away for our over-reliance on volatile corporate tax receipts.  This change would not mean Ireland becoming a high-tax economy.

The key question that should underpin Government decisions on Budget 2020 is what approach would be economically sound and socially fair?  These twin objectives are both realistic and achievable. However, they need to be underpinned by a clear policy commitment and by Budget decisions aimed at achieving both.

Main proposals on investment:

Housing: €1,077m in addition to what’s already committed in Government plans towards increasing the resources to provide an additional 120,000 sustainable homes. (p. 8 of Budget Choices)

Rural/Regional Development: €496m to help complete the rollout of high quality rural broadband, as well as additional investment in rural transport, and the development of rural enterprise and tourism, as well as increased funding for the community and voluntary sector. (p. 10 of Budget Choices)

Healthcare and disability: €1,130m investment prioritising social and community care, disability, mental health and Sláintecare.  (p. 11 of Budget Choices)

Education: €429m investment in areas such as adult literacy, DEIS, skills development, community education, digital education and higher education. (p. 12 of Budget Choices)

Sustainability: €500m investment including funding for renewable energy, and a Just Transition Fund to deal with the repercussions of implementing a Carbon Tax. (p. 14 of Budget Choices)

Children: €234m focused on Early Childhood Care and Education, paternity leave and affordable childcare. (p. 12 of Budget Choices)

ODA: An additional €144m to increase the aid budget towards the UN target of 0.7 per cent of GNI*. (p. 13 of Budget Choices)

Pensions: A universal pension financed mostly by reducing tax-breaks that currently favour the better-off. (p. 13 of Budget Choices)

Main proposals on Taxation:

TAX REFORM

  • Standard rate all discretionary tax expenditures: €480m
  • Standard rate tax break on all pension contributions: €483m
  • Remove tax refund element for R & D tax credits: €150m
  • Introduce a minimum effective corporate tax rate: €1,000m
  • Reintroduce the 50% annual cap on past losses that can be offset against current profits for individuals and corporations: €100m
  • Equalise the excise duty on diesel and petrol: €102m
  • Increase tax on in-shop and online betting by 3%: €150m

The full text of Budget Choices is available here.

 

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Some of the super-Rich are tax resident in Ireland. CSO has clarified to me that the Individual Financial Asset holders which are included in Institutional Sector Accounts(financial) in their documents are all tax resident in Ireland

  Hence all of the top 10% of Financial Asset holders who now have 50 billion more than they had at peak boom level are resident in Ireland. The gains of the tax exiles are probably of course much greater. See exchange between Seamus Healy TD and Tánaiste Simon Coveney in Dáil  further down for full details .

Financial Assets include Deposits in Financial institutions, shares, othe personal financial investments. They do not include fixed assets such as homes, business premises, farms etc as falsely implied by Coveney in his reply to Seamus.

More here: Irish Super-Rich Awash with Money   https://wp.me/pKzXa-n4

I agree that international action is needed to deal with tax exiles. But it is important to point out that the the massive financial assets possessed by the Irish Super-rich who Are tax-resident in Ireland and have not migrated are amenable to immediate taxation by the enactment of legislation in the Oireachtas THIS WEEK. If we concentrated on tax exiles only in Dáil Questions, we would get replies saying typically: “we are discussing these matters with our EU partners and with OECD blah, blah, blah” allowing government to deflect the issue. It can’t deflect from the issue of immediate taxation of financial assets which are held by individuals who ARE tax resident here.

 

Michael Noonan, former FG Finance Minister once tried to tell Seamus in a Dáil reply that financial assets were taxed through Deposit Interest Retention Tax (DIRT)   DIRT is, of course a tax on INCOME from financial assets rather than a wealth tax on the assets themselves!! Coveney, Noonan, Donohoe will of course say anything to cover up non-taxation of huge wind fall increases in wealth of the Super-Rich at the expense of the Irish People generally

 

 

 

————————————————————————————————————————————-Pearse! Could This Be Changed if Sinn Féin entered Coalition Government with FF and/or FG???

Pearse Doherty (Sinn Féin): The Irish public have spoken – the wealthy are not paying their fair share: OECD REPORT

When asked if the state should raise taxes on the rich to improve public services for all, and raise living standards for those on low incomes, a decisive and clear majority of Irish citizens, two-thirds of those surveyed, said “yes”. https://wp.me/pKzXa-oM

Pearse Doherty,Irish Times:Friday, March 29, 2019

The reason Ireland faces a historic housing crisis cutting across all levels of society, the reason our universities are free-falling down the world rankings, the reason our health service is utterly unfit to meet the medical needs of the public, is because successive Fine Gael and Fianna Fáil governments have refused to provide the investment we deserve.

This investment requires tax. So no wonder our public sphere is so underfunded when Irish people, faced with living costs which are among the highest in the developed world, are effectively subsidising tax cuts for the wealthiest in society.

 

A recent OECD effort to survey the opinions of taxpayers across the world, in high- and lower-income countries, from Asia to Europe and across the Americas, confirmed what many in Ireland already know – the rich are not paying their fair share of tax.

When asked if the state should raise taxes on the rich to improve public services for all, and raise living standards for those on low incomes, a decisive and clear majority of Irish citizens, two-thirds of those surveyed, said “yes”.

This is a sentiment felt across the world, and this two-thirds majority is reflected across the 21 countries surveyed.

There are clear and obvious reasons as to why public opinion in Ireland is so strongly against the inequality and busting-at-the-seams public services they see all around them.

For decades the richest portions of society throughout the world have seen their gains from economic growth soar, while ordinary families and those working every day of their lives to create this growth have seen next to nothing in return.

A similar picture can be seen in Ireland. Wealth inequality is growing, and following a bankers’ crash which scarred this island and decimated communities, there are now more millionaires and billionaires in Ireland than ever before.

Meanwhile, public services in Ireland are, by and large, a shadow of the effective and well-funded services found in other high-income European societies.

Housing crisis

The reason Ireland faces a historic housing crisis cutting across all levels of society, the reason our universities are free-falling down the world rankings, the reason our health service is utterly unfit to meet the medical needs of the public, is because successive Fine Gael and Fianna Fáil governments have refused to provide the investment we deserve.

This investment requires tax. So no wonder our public sphere is so underfunded when Irish people, faced with living costs which are among the highest in the developed world, are effectively subsidising tax cuts for the wealthiest in society.

Fine Gael has declared banks, that plunged the state into crisis and are now raking in profits in surplus of €1bn, will not pay tax for at least another decade. They have squandered public money through tax breaks for vulture funds and property investors filling their pockets by hoarding land and property in the midst of a housing crisis.

Token tax breaks for middle-income families will not lower the cost of childcare

In a staggering act of national sabotage, they have spent at least €7 million of public funds in appealing a European Commission decision that Apple owe the Irish people around €14bn.

For these reasons, among others, Ireland’s reputation on the international stage has been dragged through muck. We are branded a tax haven, thrown in alongside Bermuda and the Cayman Islands.

Is this waste and plunder of public resources, to shore up the profits of some of the wealthiest corporations and individuals on earth, what we would call “prudent” economic policy? Is this what we want the island of Ireland to be known for?

Dog whistle

The next time Leo Varadkar finds himself in front a microphone sounding the tax-cuts dog whistle for the coming election, we must recall a simple truth – the high quality public services that we deserve require the rich to pay their fair share. They require tax, but we are among the very lowest tax-collecting countries in the EU.

Token tax breaks for middle-income families will not lower the cost of childcare. It will not make rent more affordable. It will not reduce energy bills. In fact, by reducing the tax take, and therefore reducing the ability of the state to invest in these services, you can only expect these bills to rise.

In the OECD survey, the Irish people have spoken. They want to talk about tax. They want a fairer society, and the quality of affordable public services enjoyed by our counterparts in continental Europe. They will no longer stand for Fine Gael squandering billions, as they have over the past number of years, while living costs continue to soar.

Only by raising incomes and investing in public services will life in Ireland become more affordable – and only by ending the unacceptable plunder of public money will we achieve this.

Pearse Doherty is Sinn Fein spokesperson on finance

© 2019 irishtimes.com

————————————————————Social Justice Ireland | Analysis and Critique of Budget 2019 https://wp.me/pKzXa-oM

See chart 4.1

The Budget included an income tax package with a full year cost of €356m (€123m on USC reductions, €161m on income tax reductions and €72m on credit increases). As we show elsewhere in this document (see pages 6-7) these changes are skewed and provide larger gains to those on higher incomes compared to those on lower incomes. For example, a single person earning €25,000 gains €26.62 per annum while a single person on €75,000 gains almost 11 times more (€289.23 per annum). For the same commitment of resources that the Government allocated to reforming these income taxes (€356m) Government could have chosen a much fairer set of alternatives.

 

Paddy Healy According to Deloitte Budget Calculator 2019:

Single Self-Employed with annual incomes between 200,000 and 2 million each

– Full year TAX Gain  490 Euro Each

Single Employee on 200,000  Full Year Tax Gain   289 Eu each

Single Employee on 75,000  Full tear Tax Gain    289  EU each

Single Employee on 40,000   Full year  Tax Gain     214 Eu each

Single Employee on 25,000       Full year Tax Gain   26.62 Euro Each

Single Employee on 18,000        Full Year Tax Gain    0 (zero)

 

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Income Tax Relief  for Millionaires But Varadkar Falsely Claims That Government Would Have to Borrow to Pay The Nurses!!  He Would Only Have To Fairly Tax  Irish Super Rich Individuals 

Varadkar would not have to borrow to pay Nurses nor even to fully restore public service pay and pensions. He does not even have to violate the European Fiscal Treaty . He does not even have to increase tax on multinationals or Irish businesses.

https://wp.me/pKzXa-oM

There are professional reports showing that  Irish Super-Rich individuals are awash with money.  Statistics from CSO support this.

(SEE ALSO on this Blog:  SUPER-RICH IRISH AWASH WITH MONEY    http://wp.me/pKzXa-n4)

Nevin Economic Research Institute( Funded by ICTU) Has Shown that, When All Taxes are included, including VAT, The Richest 10% only pay the same proportion of their income in Tax as the poorest 10%!!!! This has been Confirmed by Central Statistics Office(CSO)

TOP 10% of financial asset holders now have  €50 billion above what they had at peak boom levels in 2006. (CSO Institutional Sector Accounts-Financial and Central Bank National Accounts) No tax is payable on these assets or even the increase in these assets unless they are sold. Financial assets do not include businesses, homes, buildings, farms. They do include shares , bank deposits and other personal investments owned by households paying tax in Ireland 

The Comptroller and Auditor General recently revealed that 83 high net worth individuals, with in excess of €50 million in assets each, declare taxable incomes of less than the average industrial wage-35,600Euro? They can decide what to pay themselves!At present, this is perfectly legal under legislation being presided over by the Government.

  Only 13 Irish Citizens who are tax exiles paid the levy introduced  Lenihan in 2008 in 2013

(Irish Times  Friday, April 10, 2015,

New figures from the Revenue Commissioners  show that just 13 people paid the domicile (Tax Exile) levy of €200,000 in 2013, down from 14 in 2012 and 25 in 2010. The total yield from the levy for 2013 was €1.6 million, down from €1.7 million in 2012.

According to provisional data from the Revenue, 3,393  Irish Citizens filed their annual income return for the 2013 tax year on a non-domicile basis. (Given that a tax return can apply to a couple, the true figure of those living in Ireland on a non-domiciled basis is likely to be substantially higher.)

Almost 26,000 Irish People Have Incomes Between 200,000 Euro and over 2 million Euro Per Year!!!-CSO 2016 Figures latest available-Incomes have increased further over the last 2 years

They have a total income of 10.7 billion euro per year. between them.

Over the Last 3 Budgets they all got income tax relief and Universal Social Charge reduction. In addition the 55% of them who are self-employed business people got an increase in their tax free allowance as well!

They All Got The Same Tax Relief as a Person earning 70,000 Euro per annum in the last three budgets

  3,334 Persons in the Private sector earn more than the current salary of top RTE earner Ryan-Tubridy on Euro 495,000 and they all got tax reductions.!!!

According to the Sunday Independent Rich List, the estimated wealth of the country’s 300 richest people has increased by over €12bn to €100.03bn in 2017 alone. The Richest 12 gained 6 billion of this.It was was a Tax Free Gain

 

Successive governments have deliberately allowed tax loopholes for the very rich to continue

————————————————————–Replying to Seamus Healy TD in Dáil at Leaders Questions, Tanaiste Simon Coveney Repeats Falsehoods on Irish Taxation System Debunked by Fintan O’Toole in Irish Times More than 3 years Ago

(Full Fintan O’Toole  Irish Times Article below with link)

SEAMUS HEALY TD “Will the Government introduce a supplementary budget in January to reverse the inequity of the recent budget and make the rich and powerful pay their fair share in taxation? https://wp.me/pKzXa-oM

Will the Government bring forward legislation to remedy the situation revealed by the Comptroller and Auditor General recently whereby 83 high net worth individuals, with in excess of €50 million in assets each, declare taxable incomes of less than the average industrial wage? At present, this is perfectly legal under legislation being presided over by the Government. ”

To avoid Answering the Questions Coveney Persisted in Using Income Tax only Figures instead of All Tax Figures 

Tanaiste Coveney, an experienced government minister from a longstanding wealthy Cork business and professional family, pretended not to understand that FINANCIAL ASSETS excluded FIXED ASSETS such as farms and buildings in order to mislead and obfuscate

Video of Full Debate and Panel Discussion on RTE News Now  (33 minutes in to Programme)

https://www.rte.ie/player/ie/show/leaders-questions-1019/10970042/

 

Dail Report

Seamus Healy TD

Ireland is the eighth richest country in the world but, according to the OECD, if we take all taxes into account revenue as a percentage of GDP in Ireland is the third lowest of OECD countries. We also know Ireland has the fifth lowest revenue to GDP ratio in the European Union, the figures being 35% for Ireland and 40% for the EU. Ireland is a low tax country. The real question is why it is a low tax country. Of course, the answer to this question is that the Government and previous Governments pursued a conscious and deliberate policy of protecting the massive wealth of the rich and powerful in our society and has allowed them not to pay their fair share of taxation. We know the top 10% of income recipients pay a smaller proportion of their income in all taxes than the bottom 10% of recipients. We know the top 10% of financial asset holders now have approximately €40 billion more than they had at peek boom levels in 2006 and they are not asked to pay a cent from this windfall. We also know the share of gross income going to the top 1% of earners increased from 34% in 2011 to 39% in 2016. We also know that more than half of the increase in total income over the past five years has gone to 10% of the highest earners.

The country has become unequal and this has been accelerated in the recent budget. We know the 300 wealthiest individuals, who have €100 billion, will not pay a cent of tax on this. We also know, because the Comptroller and Auditor General told us recently, that 83 high net worth individuals, with assets in excess of €50 million each, declare taxable income of less than the average industrial wage of €36,500. This is perfectly legal but absolutely shameful.

The country is profoundly unequal and it is a far cry from the vision of equality and fairness set out 100 years ago in the democratic programme of the First Dáil that met 100 yd. from here in the Mansion House in January 1919. Will the Government bring forward legislation to remedy the situation revealed by the Comptroller and Auditor General recently whereby 83 high net worth individuals, with in excess of €50 million in assets each, declare taxable incomes of less than the average industrial wage? At present, this is perfectly legal under legislation being presided over by the Government. Will the Government introduce a supplementary budget in January to reverse the inequity of the recent budget and make the rich and powerful pay their fair share in taxation?

Tanaiste Simon Coveney

The Deputy has raised many issues. I will pick up on a number of points. He seems to be suggesting we should be taxing on the basis of asset values rather than income.

 

Seamus Healy TD

No, I am not.

Tanaiste Simon Coveney

If that is what he is suggesting every farm in the country will be put out of business.

Seamus Healy TD

 

I am not suggesting that.

 

Tanaiste Simon Coveney

On the issue of whether Ireland is a high tax or low tax economy, if we ask a person on €35,000 year who is paying the higher rate of tax on some of their income, or close to it, because the threshold is just above this now, and if we compare Ireland to other countries, we ask people on middle incomes to pay the higher rate of tax on a much higher percentage of their income than in most other countries.

Deputy Brendan Howlin TD (Labour)

That is not true

Tanaiste Simon Coveney

It is true.

Deputy Brendan Howlin TD (Labour)

 

Nineteen per cent—–

 

Tanaiste Simon Coveney

The threshold whereby people get taxed at the highest rate of tax in Ireland is much lower than it is in most other countries.

Deputy Brendan Howlin TD (Labour)

 

Eighty one per cent—–

Tanaiste Simon Coveney

If we look at what we have just done in the most recent budget and in previous budgets, our priority has not been on tax cuts. The priority has been on increasing public expenditure, improving public services and supporting people who need the support of the State in multiple sectors that have not had the type of investment needed through a recessionary period. Expenditure versus tax cuts has been provided on a ratio of 2:1 repeatedly in budget after budget.

I do not accept that Ireland is a low-tax economy. The Government must always try to get the balance right between incentivising business growth, innovation and employment and incentives to work and progress through the workforce with the responsibilities of the State to have a fair and equitable tax policy. Independent reports on Ireland’s tax policy from the OECD and others show that the country is seen internationally as having a very progressive tax policy in terms of the redistribution of wealth. We should be proud of that.

 

Seamus Healy TD

What we have just heard is simply propaganda for the rich and powerful. It is an excuse to allow the rich and powerful – people who have massive incomes and assets – pay little or no taxation and certainly not their fair share. The budget was for the super-rich. It was unequal. For example, 1.8 million workers are on incomes of less than €30,000. That is 40% of the workforce, and they got no relief in the budget. The vast majority of the €356 million for tax relief in the budget went to people with significant incomes, certainly well in excess of €100,000. Allowing the rich and powerful to avoid paying their fair share of taxation is simply not compatible with providing decent, modern public services. That is why we have a housing emergency, 10,000 people homeless, 780,000 people living below the poverty line, 70,000 children growing up in poverty and why the Society of St. Vincent de Paul received 137,000 calls last year and paid €27 million to needy families.

An Ceann Comhairle

The Deputy must conclude. His time is up.

 

Seamus Healy TD

It is the Government’s duty to ensure that there is equity in taxation and that the wealthy are made to pay their fair share.

 

Tanaiste Simon Coveney

I agree with the Deputy on one thing, that the wealthy should pay their fair share.

Seamus Healy TD

They are not doing so and the Government is allowing that to happen.

Tanaiste Simon Coveney

Perhaps the Deputy will listen to the facts rather than trying to redesign them. The top 10% of earners in Ireland pay 61% of personal tax.

Seamus Healy TD

 

That is income tax only.

 

Tanaiste Simon Coveney

Yes.

Seamus Healy TD

 

What about wealth tax or asset tax?

Tanaiste Simon Coveney

The Deputy is proposing that we start taxing people’s assets. He might ask the farmers in his constituency how they would respond to that suggestion.

Seamus Healy TD

People with €50 million in assets are paying less than those who are on the average industrial wage. The Tánaiste has not even mentioned that.

 

An Ceann Comhairle

Please, Deputy Healy.

An Ceann Comhairle

 

Deputy Healy should resume his seat.

Tanaiste Simon Coveney

We have a property tax that was based on the value of properties—–

Seamus Healy TD

It is outrageous.

Tanaiste Simon Coveney

Perhaps the Deputy will consider whether he voted for that at the time, because I do not recall that he did. It was taxing the value of people’s assets.

Ruth Coppinger TD (Solidarity)

It was people’s homes, not assets.

Seamus Healy TD

It is shameful.

 

Tanaiste Simon Coveney

Is that not an asset now? We are trying to ensure that Ireland has a progressive tax system which encourages employment and encourages people to create wealth for themselves through working hard. People should not be punished for that. The system ensures that companies and individuals pay a fair share of tax. In terms of personal tax, the fact that the 10% of highest earners in Ireland are paying 61% of the overall personal tax bill speaks for itself.

Fintan O Toole Article in Irish Times

Fintan O’Toole: The myth of Ireland’s progressive tax system

 

 

https://www.irishtimes.com/…/fintan-o-toole-the-myth-of-ireland-s-progressive-tax-sy…

 

Sep 29, 2015

 

 

“The sleight-of-hand is more Tommy Cooper than Penn and Teller”.

 “The point of all the repetition is to suggest that those at the top need a break from all this world-beating fairness, while those at the bottom have nothing at all to complain about.

The funny thing about this truth is that it’s not true at all. It is, literally, not even a half-truth.”

If you got a euro every time you turned on the radio or opened a newspaper to be told that Ireland has one of the most progressive tax systems in the world, you’d be rich.

Except you wouldn’t be because Ireland has one of the most progressive tax systems in the world so the Government would take nearly all the money away from you and give it to the poor.

Repeat after me: “Ireland has one of the most progressive tax systems in the western world.” (Sunday Times editorial last Sunday)

“The deputy mentioned a progressive tax system but we have one of the most progressive tax systems in the world in Ireland (Enda Kenny, November 2014).

“We have the most progressive tax system in the OECD” (Michael Noonan, November 2014).

“We have one of the most progressive taxation systems in the world” (Chris Johns, The Irish Times, June 2014).

“Internationally, we have one of the most progressive tax systems in the world.” (Brian Hayes MEP, May 2015)

“[Ireland] has one of the most progressive tax systems in the world” (Alan Kelly, October 2014).

“The tax reforms of recent years mean that Ireland now has the most progressive tax system in the European Union” (Martin Phelan, president of the Irish Tax Institute, The Irish Times, November 2012).

“It should be acknowledged that Ireland has one of the most progressive tax systems in the world” (Michael Noonan, July 2014).

“Ireland now has one of the most progressive tax systems in the developed world” (Eamon Gilmore, October, 2013).

Deceptions

This is one of those memes that reproduces itself in a perfectly closed loop. It is that most dangerous of deceptions: a truth universally acknowledged. And therefore the logic that flows from it – that anyone who even talks about making the taxation system fairer by shifting the burden from the poor to the rich is an idiot – seeps into the groundwater of conventional wisdom, especially, as now, when a budget is in the offing.

The point of all the repetition is to suggest that those at the top need a break from all this world-beating fairness, while those at the bottom have nothing at all to complain about.

The funny thing about this truth is that it’s not true at all. It is, literally, not even a half-truth. In the way it’s expressed in each of the above quotes, it is a simple trick of language. If you ask the people who keep saying it what their evidence is they’ll always refer you to figures produced by the Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD). But the OECD figures they cite don’t actually refer to “tax systems” at all. They use a very narrow measure – income tax paid by someone earning €55,000 compared to someone earning €22,000. Be that as it may, they undeniably refer solely and specifically to income tax. A “tax system” means corporate, capital, income, property, wealth, value added and every other form of taxation. Income tax in Ireland is, in terms of the revenue raised, just 41 per cent of the tax system. A claim about that 41 per cent is being systematically converted into a “truth” about the whole system.

The sleight-of-hand is more Tommy Cooper than Penn and Teller, but it works because it tells the right people what they want to hear. Hence the substitution of “tax system” for “income tax” has become almost automatic.

Last week’s report from the Irish Tax Institute, for example, actually reads: “Ireland has one of the most progressive income tax systems in the OECD”. This becomes, as reported in the Irish Independent on September 23rd, “The institute claims Ireland’s tax system is one of the most progressive in the developed world.” See what happened there?

Why does this matter? Because it distorts a key reality of Irish life: people at the bottom pay as much of their incomes in tax as those at the top. To hide something as outrageous as this you actually need two linguistic tricks. One is the ideological autocorrect that turns “income tax” to “tax system”.

The other intertwined claim, also repeated ad nauseam, is that huge numbers of people are completely “outside the tax net”, “pay no tax” or “contribute nothing to the national coffers”.

But everyone pays tax. There’s an apparently little-known tax called VAT. There are other indirect taxes. Almost all the tax paid by the bottom 30 per cent of households is indirect. Taxes on consumption are disproportionately paid by people on low incomes who have to spend all their money.

Regressive

The bottom 10 per cent of people pay nearly 30 per cent of their incomes in indirect taxes; the top 10 per cent pay 6 per cent, according to the Nevin Institute. The whole claim to having the most progressive “tax system” depends on ignoring the highly regressive nature of indirect taxes . What do you get if you count them back in? The top 10 per cent pay 29 per cent of their incomes in tax. The bottom 10 per cent pay 28 per cent. That’s progressive in the same sense that most of the discussion about this is honest.

 

 

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BUDGET TAX UNFAIRNESS AS PREDICTED
Gross unfairness to Continue

Full Text Of Speech of Seamus Healy TD On Budget Further Down

The Minister says his income tax and USC measures are to “ease the burden on those and low and middle incomes.”  This is a deliberate Falsehood on the part of the Minister

 

 

Because of the band system for Income Tax and USC, the richer income recipients( even those on 2million EU+) get all relief conceded to those on smaller incomes

Here are the facts. Total Gain of 53, 000 persons earning  from  150, 000 Eu to over 2 million per year= 13.1 million.  – a gain of 358 Eu per year each for the two thirds who are self employed

Total Gain in Income Tax and USC Chankges  of  760,000  PAYE TAX Payers  under 20,000       =Zero

Total Gain in Income tax and USC changes  of 80,000 Self-employed under 20,000Eu =3.2 million Eu = 40 Euro Per Year  each
In other words Lowly Paid Employees will get nothing and low income self employed will get a pittance

The tiny rise in minimum wage of 25 cents will be halved by price rises and there will be no tax relief for them

No Wealth Tax!

83 Super-Rich asset holders  worth over  50 million last year declared taxable  incomes of 36,500-the average industrial wage. They can decide their own wages. Under Revenue commissioner rules they can pay themselves a multiple of 36,500 in tax free expenses.

https://wp.me/pKzXa-oM

Top 10% of all Financial Asset Holders (resident in Ireland)Have had a Tax Free Gain of at least 41.3 billion since 2006    

Not alone did the minister not lay a finger on their massive assets in the budget BUT THEY WILL GET THE SAME TAX RELIEF AS A WORKER ON THE AVERAGE INDUSTRIAL WAGE FROM THIS BUDGET

Asset Gains of Irish Citizens who are tax exiles must be added to the above

And THEY WILL NOT PAY ONE CENT Wealth Tax  on this MASSIVE GAIN IN WEALTH

Tax Exiles

“One small example of the mentality of these people towards paying their fair share is available in figures for the so-called domicile levy.

This was introduced during the depths of the recession in 2009 to bring into the net tax exiles who pay little or no tax here.

The levy was for a relatively modest €200,000 for Irish domiciled people — either resident or non-resident — and who earned over €1m for the tax year.

In the first year of the levy, 2010, a total of 32 individuals stumped up, but by 2015, this had dropped to 13. Does anybody believe that such a low take-up reflects the number of individuals who would qualify for the levy?”

 These are not my words They are from the pages of The Irish Examiner

AND THE MINISTER HAS NOT LIFTED A FINGER IN THIS BUDGET TO END THIS SCANDAL

(Financial Assets of all Irish households (Tax Resident in Ireland-Domiciled abroad excluded)

(financial Assets are bank deposits, shares, pensions, insurance policies)

2016                Net Financial Assets   209.913 Billion

2006                Net Financial Assets  132.032  Billion

Increase            77 ,8 8 1 Billion Eu

Central Bank Report-Top 10% have 53 % of All Assets (Fixed +Financial)

Assuming top 10%  have only 53% of Net Financial Assets

Increase for top 10% resident in Ireland

53% of 77,881 = 41.3 billion

It is probably much more than 53% for top 10% as very many small asset holders  have negative financial assets (financial debts-credit card debt and  unpaid bank loans greater than bank deposits)

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Full Text Of Seamus Healy’s Dáil Speech on Budget

“I welcome the opportunity to speak on budget 2019. The budget is shamefully inadequate in view of the extreme crisis in housing and health and the need to fully restore cuts in welfare, disability provision, public service pay and pensions and other areas. Some might say that today’s budget is a missed opportunity. It is not. It is a conscious and deliberate policy decision by Fine Gael, the Independent Alliance and Fianna Fáil to protect the massive increase in wealth of the Irish super rich from fair taxation and to make further tax concessions to them. Prudent budgeting does not require limiting spending to the shamefully inadequate figures in today’s budget. The European Union’s fiscal treaty does not require it either, and it does not forbid raising extra revenue provided it is recurrent. Significant additional income could have been raised if the Government was prepared to make the super rich pay their fair share in taxation. The Minister said numerous times that his income tax and USC measures are to ease the burden on those on low and middle incomes. Nothing could be further from the truth. This is a budget for the super rich.

What happened in this budget? According to the CSO, 1.18 million workers are on incomes of less than €30,000 per year. Some 1 million of them are PAYE workers and 180,000 are self-employed. They comprise 40% of the workforce. There is no income tax gain for the 1 million PAYE workers in this category, not even a cent. The income tax gain for the 180,000 self-employed is the princely sum of €40 per year, less than €1 per week. The EU tells us that inflation next year will be 1.3%, which will wipe out the huge figure of €40 per year. There is an increase of €5 in social welfare payments. Social welfare recipients must wait until next March to get it and it does not go anywhere near restoring the pre-cut levels of payment. For the third year in a row there is no increase in child benefit.

Contrast that to what has happened to people of wealth, the rich and powerful in our society. The CSO says that 53,000 individuals have incomes ranging from €150,000 to €2 million per annum. They get the full tax and USC benefits of this budget, totalling €13.1 million. There is a golden circle of rich and powerful individuals in this society who have not been touched by the budget. There is no wealth tax on their assets, and they have huge assets. The top 10% of these wealthiest individuals have assets that are €40 billion above peak boom levels. They will not pay a cent on them. The overall financial assets are now €77 billion above peak boom levels and there is not a single cent of taxation on them either. The 300 wealthiest individuals who have €100 billion will not pay a cent on those assets.

Last week, the Comptroller and Auditor General reported on how these individuals avoided tax. He described it as tax avoidance by the super rich. Some 83 of these high net worth individuals, with in excess of €50 million in assets, declared taxable income of less than the average industrial wage of less than €36,500. It is shameful. With regard to the banks, Bank of Ireland, AIB and Permanent TSB had profits last year of €2.5 billion. They did not pay a euro in tax on them and they will not pay one euro this year or for the next 20 years. The last Government and this Government have exempted them from such tax. These are the banks that the taxpayer bailed out. They are the banks that brought huge and savage austerity on the backs of families throughout this country. They continue to evict families from their family homes, but they will not pay a single cent in tax.

This budget continues the bonanza for landlords. The provision of 100% mortgage interest relief to them in respect of the purchase, improvement and repair of properties will be hugely damaging to the housing market. It will enable landlords to outbid young people in the purchase of houses and it will drive up prices even further. This provision should be withdrawn immediately. This budget also provides an additional €121 million for landlords under the guise of the HAP scheme, on top of the €1.1 billion provided in 2018 under this scheme for landlords. This is hugely damaging to housing and families. The Government is again putting its trust in private developers and private landlords to solve the housing crisis, which they have never done and never will do. It is time the Government changed its policy on housing. We need public housing on public land and in huge numbers.

This budget widens the divide between the rich and poor. Ireland is a wealthy country. Taking GDP per head of population, Ireland is wealthier than Germany, the UK, the US, France and Italy. Overall, Ireland is ranked eighth in the world in wealth terms. The top 10,000 earners here have incomes totalling €6 billion per annum, which is an average of €600,000 each. They have received the full benefit of the income tax and USC reductions over the past three years and in this budget. The top 5% of all income earners on incomes of €180,000 per annum received income tax and USC reductions in the past two budgets totalling €172 million. Today, they again will benefit in full from the income and USC reductions and fabulously wealthy people will escape any additional imposition on their massive and growing wealth.

The Society of St. Vincent de Paul, SVP, budget submission months ago sketched the background to this budget. Its document entitled, Paving a Pathway out of Poverty, sets out the situation for ordinary people in this country. Some 780,000 people are living below the poverty line; 70,000 children are growing up in poverty; 10,000 people are homeless, including almost 4,000 children; there are 100,000 families on local authority housing waiting lists; there are 102,000 working poor; 48% of people went without heating owing to cost; 520,000 adults have poor literary skills and, last year, the society received 130,000 calls for assistance and supported families to the tune of €27 million. Today’s budget will do nothing for the people the SVP helped last year and have been helping for years. If the issues raised by the SVP are to be tackled, rich and powerful people in this society will have to be made pay their fair share. If national and local issues are to be tackled successfully and if public services are to be improved and additional services provided, wealthy people in this country, which is the eighth wealthiest in the world, must be made pay their fair share.

Issues need to be dealt with in my constituency of Tipperary. There is an urgent need for acute inpatient mental health beds in Tipperary. These beds need to be put in place to replace the beds lost when former Minister of State, Kathleen Lynch, unfairly, unjustly and, in my view, outrageously closed St. Michael’s unit in Clonmel. Moneys from this budget must be ring-fenced to ensure beds are opened to replace those that were wrongly closed and to properly resource, staff and fund community mental health teams and CAMHS teams in Tipperary. Mental health services in the county are substandard, acute beds are non-existent and these issues need to be tackled urgently. I have raised them on numerous occasions and will return to them in the near future.

Communities in rural towns throughout the country, including Tipperary town, Carrick-on-Suir, Thurles, Nenagh and Roscrea, have been abandoned by this Government and by previous Governments. They need support from Government so that they can develop economically and socially and create jobs, boost the retail trade, build public housing and support community facilities. The Project 2040 plan is not fit for purpose when it comes to rural Ireland and, in particular, rural market towns. This plan must be revisited urgently to ensure towns such as those I have mentioned are targeted for development and job creation.

I have referred to the health services in Tipperary but I would like to address the issue of the assessment of needs for children with disabilities. Under the Disability Act 2015 assessments of need are required to be completed within six months of a referral but throughout the country, including in Tipperary, this provision is not being adhered to. The HSE is breaking the law in this regard. I have been contacted by numerous families who have been told in writing by the HSE in Tipperary that their child will not be seen for two years. It is vital that young children are assessed at an early age if they are to benefit from the services that should be provided for them.

There is also a white elephant in Cashel, County Tipperary, in what was formerly Our Lady’s Hospital. That hospital was upgraded at a cost of some €14 million and fully fitted out as a hospital, but the ward areas have been closed for years now. That refurbished area was to be opened up as a 65 bed hospital to provide step-down, palliative care and district hospital facilities. It is a shame that it is still vacant and it should be opened to provide a back up to the other hospitals in the area – South Tipperary General Hospital and University Hospital Limerick.

On roads, I welcome the additional investment of €40 million for the upkeep of local and regional roads. Regional roads and local roads, in particular, are in an absolutely atrocious state across the country, including in Tipperary. The figure which Tipperary County Council management has indicated would be needed to upgrade the roads in the county to a reasonable standard is €196 million. Obviously, €40 million nationally will not go very far on that. I wish to raise the question of the upgrading of the N24 to motorway status again. That is the lifeblood of social and economic activity all the way from Limerick to Wexford. The upgrade would include the bypassing of Tipperary town, Clonmel and Carrick-on-Suir. That needs to be done as soon as possible.

On education, the increase in capitation is welcome even though it is not huge. It would appear that some money has been made available for leadership and working principals. I hope there is enough money in that to ensure that principals are able to properly carry out their functions on an ongoing basis and have the time and space to do same. There does not appear to be a change in class sizes, nor does there appear to be any provisions in place regarding official panels, which are badly needed.

I have spoken consistently about housing in this Chamber for a number of years. Like earlier speakers, I must also say that the provisions in this budget on housing are disappointing to put it mildly. The fact of the matter is that there is a housing emergency out there. It is time this Government acknowledged that emergency and implemented the Private Members’ motion which was passed here last week, requesting the declaration of a statutory emergency by the Oireachtas. Unless and until that is done, the housing situation will get worse. On a daily basis I have families contacting me who are homeless, have got notice to quit or are couch-surfing with relatives and friends. The situation has gotten worse over the last 12 months and the provisions in this budget will certainly not make any effective difference to it. We need the emergency to be declared and we need evictions to stop. There is a need for families to be allowed to retain their tenancies in sale situations so that they are not forced out of their private rented accommodation into homelessness. We need a huge emergency building programme of public housing on public land and we need to do that quickly.

I ask the Government again to look at the proposal by Irish Water to bring water from the Shannon to Dublin. This is a hugely wasteful proposal which will be a waste of public money if it goes ahead. The pipes in Dublin are leaking over 50% of the water that goes into them. It is a situation that is seen nowhere else in the western world. In most European countries and cities the maximum leakage is in the region of 10%. The highest figure that we know of is in London which is at 25%. Apart from the words of the Fight the Pipe Ireland organisation in Tipperary and Ms Emma Kennedy who has done an analysis on this, a professor in Dublin City University has recently said that going ahead with this project is akin to throwing money out of an open window. As I have said, this is hugely wasteful and completely unnecessary. The pipes in Dublin need to be replaced because otherwise water will be sent from the Shannon into the ground in Dublin because the pipes will be leaking out over 50% of the water.

I am not at all happy that this budget deals with the real world in any way. This Government, the Independent Alliance and Fianna Fáil have lost all contact with ordinary people and this budget book of Estimates proves that.”

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Why a Wealth or Assets Tax is necessary for Tax Equity and To Fund Adequate Public Services such as Housing,Health, Education

Tax Advice to Multi-Millionaires By “Accountant”!  https://wp.me/pKzXa-oM

Above all stay funding pro-capitalist political parties so that you can continue to pay little tax, continue to avail of public services and continue to enrich yourself at the expense of the Irish people.

How can 83 individuals with assets of over 50 million each declare taxable income of less than 36,500EU which is the average industrial wage? The following device is not mentioned in the Irish Times Article by Cliff Taylor at the link below which describes many other tax avoidance strategies: If you work in a company which you fully or partially own, simply pay yourself less than 35,000. As this is approximately the threshold for payment of the 40% tax rate, all your income will be taxed at 20%. You could pay yourself much less than 35,000. This would make room for income from your bank deposits to be also charged at 20%. The artificially reduced salary increases profits  which accrue to you.! Some profits may be written off against past losses. You don’t need a large income. If you are short a million or two, you could sell off some of your 50 million in assets. Being a very wealthy person, you probably bought shares and property at the bottom of the market during the crash. You make a handsome profit much more than required to finance your high-life. This profit does not come under income tax. All-right-you have to pay capital gains tax  at 33% but that is only on the gain or profit not on the sale value of the gross asset!

Better Still,you could become tax resident abroad if you have not already done so.

“One small example of the mentality of these people towards paying their fair share is available in figures for the so-called domicile levy.

This was introduced during the depths of the recession in 2009 to bring into the net tax exiles who pay little or no tax here.

The levy was for a relatively modest €200,000 for Irish domiciled people — either resident or non-resident — and who earned over €1m for the tax year.

In the first year of the levy, 2010, a total of 32 individuals stumped up, but by 2015, this had dropped to 13. Does anybody believe that such a low take-up reflects the number of individuals who would qualify for the levy?

Far more likely that hundreds of those who would qualify have found legitimate routes to avoid paying it. If that’s the attitude to a symbolic contribution to the national coffers, what lengths do these people go to in order to avoid serious taxes?”— Irish Examiner Tuesday, November 07, 2017  Michael Clifford

Above all stay funding pro-capitalist political parties so that you can continue to pay little tax, continue to avail of public services and continue to enrich yourself at the expense of the Irish people.

Tax Avoidance by Super-Rich-Summary of C&AG Report

About 90 of the wealthiest people in the country pay income tax at a lower rate than the average taxpayer, according to a new report from the Comptroller & Auditor General And 83 of these so-called high net worth individuals, or one in four of the total, declared taxable income of less than the average industrial wage, which is just over €36,500.

The C&AG report said 140 high net worth individuals, or 42 per cent of the total of 334, declared taxable income of less than €125,000 in 2015.

The study by the C&AG, in the latest annual report, covered the Revenue’s taxation of 334 of the country’s richest people in 2015. Revenue defines high net worth individuals as those with more than €50 million in assets and the C&AG report shows a huge variation in the income tax paid by the 334 people who fell within this group.

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The four tricks Ireland’s super rich use to avoid paying Tax

Cliff Tatylor, Irish Times, Thursday, October 4, 2018, 12:47

Figures from the Revenue Commissioners show many of the State’s wealthiest people pay relatively little income tax here. We will look at the four main ways they achieve this.

Analysis of the figures shows on average this group pays a lower percentage of tax on their income than higher-earning PAYE taxpayers. And many use tax arrangements, reliefs and allowances to declare extraordinarily low amounts of income for tax in the Republic.

Ireland has what is called a highly progressive income tax system – the burden rises sharply as income rises. The average taxpayer pays income tax at an effective rate of just over 16 per cent – meaning this is the percentage of their income taken in taxes.

But the bill rises sharply as you earn more. A taxpayer – either an individual or a jointly assessed couple – with earnings between €100,000 and €150,000 pays an average of 35 per cent of their gross income in tax and USC.

The group earning between €150,000 and €200,000 pays almost 38 per cent, those earning between €200,000 and €25,000 pay an average of 40 per cent and those earning over €250,000 pay an affective rate of 42 per cent. So, in general, the better off not only pay more in case terms, but they pay at a higher rate.

That is until you get to the super-rich, when the the effective tax rate turns lower and a significant minority pay surprisingly little. The Comptroller & Auditor General, the State spending watchdog, examined the tax affairs of 334 high-net-worth individuals – those with assets in excess of €50 million – and what they paid in 2015.

It found their effective tax rate was 39 per cent, at the upper end of the spectrum, but less than the average effective tax on all earnings of those with gross incomes of €150,000 or more , which comes in at about 41 per cent.

Who the “super -tax ten” might be is now the subject of much speculation.

But the breakdown was even more remarkable. Some 85 per cent of the €473 million in income tax due from this group of 334 came from just ten taxpayers. This means that ten people paid not far off €40 million each on average in tax that year. Tax experts are surprised at this level of payment and speculate that this must have been due to the exercising of share options by senior executives in major companies, where gains are now generally subject to income tax. Who the “super -tax ten” might be is now the subject of much speculation.

The flip side of this is that many of the rest paid very little, with one in four declaring incomes for tax less than the average industrial wage.

So how do the super-rich do it? There are the four key ways, but they share one similar characteristic. The reliefs and arrangements they are based on are all part of the normal tax system. But being very wealthy opens up new options, particularly for those who operate across different countries.

1. Go offshore

Many wealthy individuals operate across different jurisdictions, often choosing to be tax resident in a place where they pay less income tax. The price is a limit on the time they spend here. In tax terms this means that they would declare income for tax in the Republic relating to earnings here, which might only be a fraction of their total income. This is likely to explain the extraordinarily low amounts of income declared here for tax by some of the wealthiest.

There are two problems here . The first is a lack of transparency on what these people pay and a suspicion that, like major corporates, they exploit gaps and anomalies between different tax jurisdictions to cut their bills. Transfer of information between tax authorities is now stepping up to try to tackle abuses here.

The second, separate, problem is the use of offshore vehicles either in aggressive tax-avoidance schemes or for pure, illegal tax evasion. Many of the super rich have had the resources to set up opaque structures using trusts, for example, and Irish tax history is littered with examples of offshore evasion, most famously through the Ansbacher deposits: money hidden offshore in the Cayman Islands.

Others have avoided tax on selling their company by becoming resident abroad for a period – though tax rules in this area now generally require residency overseas for five years to do this – or by setting up complex offshore structures to try avoid paying tax on a company sale.

2. Claim a loss and write it off

Tax systems have to have some mechanism to allow people to balance off gains and losses to calculate what they owe for tax. This is most obvious in relation to capital gains tax, where people can gain or lose on investments. It can also be a factor in income tax.

Some of the low tax bills paid by the super rich are likely to relate to their ability to write off previous losses. For example, tax experts say many would have rental losses dating back to the crash. This would have occurred because during the downturn the allowable costs of borrowing to purchase rental properties and/or the rent received exceeded the return the investors were getting from their portfolio. Unlike many other tax reliefs, there is no restriction on the use of the relief by wealthy taxpayers as a write off against current rental income.

Some of the low tax bills paid by the super rich are likely to relate to their ability to write off previous losses.

However the C&AG report shows that delicate line between tax avoidance and evasion in the area of losses – a factor also clear in the UK, where a number of the schemes involving celebrities having to pay up have been based on creating false tax losses.

In the Republic, a number of these schemes have also fallen foul of the Revenue. One involved 25 taxpayers with total “losses” of €550 million, with a potential reduction in capital gains tax of €110 million. Sources say that this involved an arrangement run by a prominent London investment bank would would create “losses” for investors on complex investments in foreign exchange products and forward purchases of government bonds. The Revenue tackled the scheme and has successfully argued that there was no economic reality behind the losses. A number of other similar schemes creating income tax or capital losses have also been successfully challenged.

3. Get money out of your company in a tax-efficient way

The self-employed have more options to manage their tax affairs than those on PAYE. Profits earned by their company – if it is trading – are taxed at 12.5 per cent. The owner is taxed as income is drawn down, but has options in terms of how to time the extraction of cash. Many of the self-employed would also use pension planning to try to reduce their bill. And in many cases investment in capital – such as plant or property for a business – creates a genuine reason to reduce taxable income. Capital allowances were the biggest vehicle used by the wealthy to cut their tax bill, according to the report.

Here again, however, we see how legal tax avoidance arrangements can slip into evasion, with methods of “ extracting” cash from a company a key focus of the tax advisory industry and an area where some schemes have crossed the line.

Capital allowances were the biggest vehicle used by the wealthy to cut their tax bill, according to the report.

One, marketed by a prominent tax consultant, involved 100 cases with a tax at risk of €40.8 million. The Revenue has been challenging these cases and has so far collected €12 million from 43 taxpayers. This scheme involved people owning companies shuffling shares and the rights attached to them between companies, ending in the liquidation of a company with significant assets. The owners then tried to take cash out as a capital gain, taxable at 33 per cent at the time, rather than income, taxable at over 50 per cent. Another smaller schemes involved trusts being used for the same purpose.

4. Use a scheme

Tax schemes to shelter income, generally related to property , were the method used by the better off over the years to shelter income from tax. Many of these evolved from schemes to encourage development in certain run-down areas to become what were effectively tax dodges. Most of these schemes are now closed, though reliefs still apply to student accommodating, for example.

Significant tax has also been saved – and investigations are still ongoing – on so-called section 248 schemes which allowed people to get tax relief on borrowings made to invest in their business. The C&AG report shows Revenue investigations involving 50 cases here with €16.5 million tax at risk. Some schemes are believed to have involved borrowings being taken out in foreign currencies at artificially high rates. However, the ability to claim such borrowings against tax is now severely reduced as tax rules have tightened.

Other tax schemes remain. A string were used by the wealthy, according to the report, resulting in benefits to taxpayers averaging €167,000 each. These included a scheme allowing people to get relief on money spent on buildings or gardens of national interest, venture capital reliefs, maintenance allowance – relating to relief on money paid to an ex-partner – and trans-border relief, which is an allowance for tax paid overseas for people who are tax resident here.

* * * * * * * *

The bottom line is that the super-rich have more options. They can manage, in some cases, which country they pay their tax in and it is worth their while to pay for expensive advice to ensure they pay as little as possible on what they declare in the Republic. The famous US businesswoman and convicted tax dodger, the late Leona Helmsley, once famously declared that “only the little people pay taxes.” It would be an exaggeration to say that this was the case in Ireland, with many tax shelters closed off and higher earners paying the bulk of income tax. But many of the really wealthy are still using the options that remain to very successfully cut their tax bill. And the report shows that measures used to address this, such as the €200,000 domicile levy introduced in 2010, are having a limited impact.

 

 

 

 

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Why a Wealth or Assets Tax is necessary for Tax Equity and To Fund Adequate Public Services such as Housing,Health, Education

Tax Advice to Multi-Millionaires!  https://wp.me/pKzXa-oM

Above all stay funding pro-capitalist political parties so that you can continue to pay little tax, continue to avail of public services and continue to enrich yourself at the expense of the Irish people.

How can 83 individuals with assets of over 50 million each declare taxable income of less than 36,500EU which is the average industrial wage? The following device is not mentioned in the Irish Times Article by Cliff Taylor at the link below which describes many other tax avoidance strategies: If you work in a company which you fully or partially own, simply pay yourself less than 35,000. As this is approximately the threshold for payment of the 40% tax rate, all your income will be taxed at 20%. You could pay yourself much less than 35,000. This would make room for income from your bank deposits to be also charged at 20%. The artificially reduced salary increases profits  which accrue to you.! Some profits may be written off against past losses. You don’t need a large income. If you are short a million or two, you could sell off some of your 50 million in assets. Being a very wealthy person, you probably bought shares and property at the bottom of the market during the crash. You make a handsome profit much more than required to finance your high-life. This profit does not come under income tax. All-right-you have to pay capital gains tax  at 33% but that is only on the gain or profit not on the sale value of the gross asset!

Better Still,you could become tax resident abroad if you have not already done so.

“One small example of the mentality of these people towards paying their fair share is available in figures for the so-called domicile levy.

This was introduced during the depths of the recession in 2009 to bring into the net tax exiles who pay little or no tax here.

The levy was for a relatively modest €200,000 for Irish domiciled people — either resident or non-resident — and who earned over €1m for the tax year.

In the first year of the levy, 2010, a total of 32 individuals stumped up, but by 2015, this had dropped to 13. Does anybody believe that such a low take-up reflects the number of individuals who would qualify for the levy?

Far more likely that hundreds of those who would qualify have found legitimate routes to avoid paying it. If that’s the attitude to a symbolic contribution to the national coffers, what lengths do these people go to in order to avoid serious taxes?”— Irish Examiner Tuesday, November 07, 2017  Michael Clifford

Above all stay funding pro-capitalist political parties so that you can continue to pay little tax, continue to avail of public services and continue to enrich yourself at the expense of the Irish people.

Tax Avoidance by Super-Rich-Summary of C&AG Report

About 90 of the wealthiest people in the country pay income tax at a lower rate than the average taxpayer, according to a new report from the Comptroller & Auditor General And 83 of these so-called high net worth individuals, or one in four of the total, declared taxable income of less than the average industrial wage, which is just over €36,500.

The C&AG report said 140 high net worth individuals, or 42 per cent of the total of 334, declared taxable income of less than €125,000 in 2015.

The study by the C&AG, in the latest annual report, covered the Revenue’s taxation of 334 of the country’s richest people in 2015. Revenue defines high net worth individuals as those with more than €50 million in assets and the C&AG report shows a huge variation in the income tax paid by the 334 people who fell within this group.

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Many of those with over €50m in assets paid small amounts of income tax

Cliff Taylor Irish Times Friday, September 28, 2018, https://wp.me/pKzXa-oM

About 90 of the wealthiest people in the country pay income tax at a lower rate than the average taxpayer, according to a new report from the Comptroller & Auditor General And 83 of these so-called high net worth individuals, or one in four of the total, declared taxable income of less than the average industrial wage, which is just over €36,500.

The report shows many of Ireland’s very highest earners pay relatively small amounts in income tax, with many using tax credits and reliefs to cut their bills.

The study by the C&AG, in the latest annual report, covered the Revenue’s taxation of more than 300 of the country’s richest people in 2015. Revenue defines high net worth individuals as those with more than €50 million in assets and the C&AG report shows a huge variation in the income tax paid by the 334 people who fell within this group.

The Revenue has accepted a recommendation from the C&AG to consider changing the €50 million benchmark, which is high by international levels and looks set to step up anti-avoidance activity with the establishment of a special unit to oversee these personal taxpayers.

Paid relatively little

While on average this group of wealthy people pay tax at a rate of between 30 and 40 per cent on their incomes, a significant minority pay a lot less, with 90 paying an effective tax rate less than the average income taxpayer in 2015.

Just 10 taxpayers from the group were responsible for 85 per cent of the €473 million income tax bill owed in total, meaning that many of the rest paid relatively little. Some declared little income for tax here, presumably due to tax residency elsewhere, while other successfully used a range of credits and reliefs to shelter income from tax.

The C&AG report, which otherwise highlights a litany of waste in Government departments, said 140 high net worth individuals, or 42 per cent of the total, declared taxable income of less than €125,000 in 2015.

Many used tax reliefs including capital allowances, write-offs related to business investment. Some ended up in disputes with Revenue over their use of avoidance schemes, in one case resulting in a €10 million payment.

Very highest earners

A spokesman for the Department of Finance said the Irish tax system was widely regarded internationally as highly progressive, with the better-off paying more. However the report shows that measures introduced by the State to increase the tax take from the very highest earners are having a limited impact. There were just seven returns in 2015 for the domicile levy introduced in 2010 to get a contribution of €200,000 from wealthy individuals, who would otherwise pay little income tax here.

The C&AG also highlighted the ongoing losses to the exchequer from tax rules which allow companies to carry forward losses – most made during the crash – to write off against their tax bills. In 2016 a total of €231 billion in losses and unused allowances were available for offset, meaning €29 billion in possible future reduced corporation tax payments in the years ahead. Some €16 billion was claimed against tax in 2016.

The C&AG says this means the banking sector,which holds almost €120 billion of the tax losses, not paying any tax on profits for another 12 years.

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Banks set to remain exempt from tax!

Last year, Bank of Ireland, AIB, and PTSB made combined profits of €2.5bn. At 12.5% that would yield 312.5 million in Revenue. However, they paid no tax. In 2015, the FG-Lab Government changed the rules allowing banks to defer taxes for up to 20 years.

Banks set to remain exempt from tax

By Juno McEnroe, Political Correspondent, Irish Examiner August 23,2018

Banks are likely to be allowed to continue to pay zero tax on billion euro profits following a Department of Finance review of exemptions for lenders and other corporations.

Finance Minister Paschal Donohoe will present a review on corporation tax to an Oireachtas committee next month. This will highlight the continuation of the current bank levy as opposed to changes to the tax exemption.

The bank levy yields €150m annually. However, Opposition TDs want the tax exemption, which allows banks write off taxes against past losses, scrapped. This is despite many banks having returned to huge profit.

Last year, Bank of Ireland, AIB, and PTSB made combined profits of €2.5bn. However, they paid no tax. In 2015, the Government changed the rules allowing banks to defer taxes for up to 20 years.

An internal Department of Finance report for Mr Donohoe has looked at the effect of limiting the provision of tax relief for losses carried forward for the banks.

While the report was scheduled to be completed in June, the scope was extended so officials could examine scrapping tax exemptions for all corporate entities as well as the use of a sunset clause.

The Irish Examiner understands that Mr Donohoe is opposed to overhauling the tax regime for banks or corporate entities. Similarly, a cap on profits before taxes kick in is opposed.

A Department of Finance source said: “The bank levy is a more appropriate method as opposed to messing with the tax system and other corporate groups.”

The department is also conscious that any tax increases for State-owned banks, particularly AIB, could affect their share prices.

“The taxpayer has a huge interest here already,” said the department source.

Department tax strategy group papers for Budget 2019, released earlier this month, show there is little appetite to scrap exemptions for the banks.

One paper noted the bank levy yields €150m annually and was introduced “in part to recognise the fact that many banks would not pay” tax for many years.

The paper noted Mr Donohoe views the “bank levy as the appropriate method of ensuring the banks contribute to the exchequer”.

The report on bank taxes is expected to say that the provision of relief for such losses is a standard feature of Ireland’s tax code and that of all other countries in the OECD. It will also examine how other governments do or do not allow bank losses to be carried over.

The latest Revenue figures, for 2016, show that trading losses carried forward in all sectors amounted to some €214bn. Over half of this was in the financial and insurance sectors.

Oireachtas Finance Committee TDs and senators are expected to receive the report on bank losses from the minister next month.

Sinn Féin’s Pearse Doherty wants a 25% cap on the carrying forward of losses and a 10-year limit to ensure banks pay a fair share.

The party maintains that the tax system should be built on fairness and the exemptions for banks must end so that “hundreds of millions in tax can be collected”.

But department sources say the minister won’t reinstate the tax for banks.

A source added: “This report examines the pros and cons of the treatment of [bank] losses. The chances are, he won’t make changes.”

Meanwhile, Taoiseach Leo Varadkar has said the budget will provide further tax relief for middle-income earners but must ensure that the public finances are ready for any “economic turmoil” in the years ahead.

He also confirmed that revenue-raising measures are being considered to increase the €800m extra available next year to spend on services and tax cuts.

His comments come as the Government prepares to begin negotiations with Fianna Fáil for Budget 2019.

Speaking at the agriculture show in Virginia, Cavan, Mr Varadkar said every demand could not be met and the first priority is to balance the books and reduce debt: “If we are heading into any economic turmoil in the years ahead because of Brexit or anything else, the best way to prepare for that is to make sure that our public finances are in order.”

 

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Only 13 Millionaire Tax Exiles Pay Up The Revenue.  Brian Lenihan introduced the Tax , NOONAN/BURTON LEFT IT TO WITHER ON THE VINE As they Slashed Allowances fir the Disabled, Loan Parents, the lowly paid and those in Fuel Poverty!!!

“One small example of the mentality of these people towards paying their fair share is available in figures for the so-called Domicile Levy (Tax Exiles)”.

Time to make wealthy elite pay their dues

Time to Stop Government Savagery

Irish Examiner Tuesday, November 07, 2017     Michael Clifford

The latest tax avoidance revelations by wealthy companies and individuals should hopefully prompt greater action to make them pay their taxes.

One small example of the mentality of these people towards paying their fair share is available in figures for the so-called domicile levy.

This was introduced during the depths of the recession in 2009 to bring into the net tax exiles who pay little or no tax here.

The levy was for a relatively modest €200,000 for Irish domiciled people — either resident or non-resident — and who earned over €1m for the tax year.

In the first year of the levy, 2010, a total of 32 individuals stumped up, but by 2015, this had dropped to 13. Does anybody believe that such a low take-up reflects the number of individuals who would qualify for the levy?

Far more likely that hundreds of those who would qualify have found legitimate routes to avoid paying it. If that’s the attitude to a symbolic contribution to the national coffers, what lengths do these people go to in order to avoid serious taxes?

But of course, they tell themselves that they are paying their fair share, and are merely being “creative” and engaging in “tax planning” through the myriad of off-shore avoidance vehicles.

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STATE OWNED AIB  HELPED IRISH SUPR-RICH TO EVADE TAX AFTER BAIL-OUT WHILE DISABLED, LONE PARENTS, HOME HEATING FOR THE POOR ETC WERE SAVAGELY CUT

KENNY, Burton, Noonan, Howlin ETC  Allowed This Cruelty While PUBLIC INTEREST DIRECTOR OF AIB  LOOKED ON!!

Paradise Papers: AIB targeted Irish clients looking to avoid tax after bailout

Colm Keena, Irish Times,  Monday, November 6, 2017,

AIB, Ireland’s largest bank, continued to target Irish customers who wanted to avoid paying tax after it had been bailed out at a cost to the public of €7 billion, leaked documents show.

Leaked files from the Isle of Man (IOM) offices of offshore law firm Appleby reveal Government-owned AIB also refused to give the Revenue Commissioners access to data on its offshore customers when responding to a court order in 2015.

The customers of its offshore operations included former clients of Anglo Irish Bank in the Isle of Man, which had merged with AIB International Savings Ltd (ISL) in Douglas.

The offshore operation instead sought to have the data moved from the bank’s central server in the Republic to Jersey and the Isle of Man, to better provide for its clients’ confidentiality.

AIB ISL and AIB (CI) Ltd, which is based in Jersey, “declined to provide the consent requested and confirmed to AIB plc that the Irish Revenue Commissioners should follow established procedures under IOM and Jersey law should they wish to proceed to obtain any such information,” said a letter prepared by the law firm in the Isle of Man, for the two offshore banks.

The files show that when AIB was forming its unified group data system in 2006, AIB Offshore foresaw that such a development would create confidentiality issues for its high net worth customers if the Revenue was able to argue that the data held on the AIB server was under the “power, possession and procurement” of Dublin-based AIB plc.

A spokesman for the bank would not say whether it subsequently acceded to the Revenue Commissioners’ request.

The Isle Of Man, which disputes claims that it is a tax haven, has strong banking confidentiality laws.

Appleby has provided legal advice to AIB Offshore, as the Irish bank’s offshore business is called, for more than two decades, and more recently has been providing management services to the offshore branches following AIB’s decision in 2012 to close and wind down the business.

The Appleby documents, seen by The Irish Times as part of the Paradise Papers project organised through the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists, provide a unique insight into AIB Offshore’s battles with the Revenue Commissioners over the past 20 years.

They show that the bank changed its business model in 1998 to only accepting residents of Ireland who could avail of legitimate tax planning opportunities.

A note drafted prior to a board meeting of AIB IOM in 2004 broke the business into a pre-1998 model, from which period the bank continued to have “legacy” customers, and post-1998 when the offshore bank business become more focused on high net worth individuals who “legitimately” availed of the bank’s services.

The pre-1998 customers were “resident and domiciled in Ireland [and] may have a tax liability on income arising”, the note said.

“The vast majority of our Irish resident customers taken on since 1998 will have a tax planning rationale for holding an offshore account as AIB Bank (Isle of Man) Limited adopted a policy of only accepting non-domiciled residents of Ireland who could avail of legitimate tax planning opportunities.”

Attractive taxation position

An internal document dated 2006 said the offshore subsidiaries “provide services to Irish and UK resident non-domiciled individuals, most of whom are very wealthy and legitimately avail of offshore services due to the attractive taxation position that applies to them in Ireland and the UK”.

The documents show that the bank’s offshore arm continued to target Irish residents after it was taken into State ownership and hoped to generate business from existing AIB customers. Its offshore operations argued that they could continue to be a crucial source of deposits for the AIB group, pointing out that the AIB offshore subsidiaries, and the now-merged Anglo IOM branch, had combined deposits at their height of “almost €7 billion”.

Up to the time the decision was made to close it in 2012, AIB Offshore saw itself playing a crucial role in the AIB group by getting business from “high net worth individuals”, the vast bulk of whom would be doing business with the bank for “tax planning” reasons, the documents show. The resultant deposits could then be used by the group.

In a document prepared by AIB (CI) in 2011, prior to a meeting with the Jersey Financial Services Commission – which was at the time concerned about the stability of the AIB group – the offshore bank said it remained “a key provider of funding for AIB” with deposit balances peaking at £2.8 billion in June 2010, after which credit rating difficulties led to a sustained withdrawal of funds. By April 2011, deposits had fallen to £1.36 billion.

Opportunities existed for the merged Anglo/AIB offshore businesses in the expatriate market. “Leverage the strengths of both businesses in both pure deposit taking and transactional banking for ex pats,” the document said. “Gain larger share of worldwide ex-pat market to produce long term sticky retail deposits.” The bank would also “generate referrals from the AIB group for genuine ex-pats.”

The decision of the offshore operations to change their focus coincided with a clampdown by the Revenue on money held in the offshore arms of Irish banks following a number of well-publicised controversies.

The documents show it sparked a lengthy battle with, on one side, the offshore arms of the banks, arguing that they were separate legal entities operating under the laws of the offshore jurisdictions where they were located, while the Revenue sought to use the transaction links between AIB in the Republic and AIB Offshore to gain access to information held in the Republic about offshore trusts, deposits, and other offshore assets that were linked to Irish taxpayers.

While the data held offshore might be beyond the Revenue’s reach, details of many of the Irish owners of offshore trusts and deposits were traceable on the IT systems in the Republic as a result of so-called clearing transactions.

‘Qualified disclosure’

The leaked documents show that in December of 2003 the then group chief executive of AIB, Michael Buckley, wrote to the IOM subsidiary about the planned Revenue investigation into offshore assets and the Revenue’s suggestion that the banks write to customers advising them of the benefits of making a “qualified disclosure”.

The opportunities to grow the company in the future depended on the Irish authorities drawing a line under the ‘bad name’ offshore has in Ireland once and for all

A qualified disclosure is when the person with a tax liability approaches the Revenue before it has noticed the offender and begun its inquiry. The benefits of disclosure include avoiding the possibility of prosecution, having your name published, and certain penalties.

The IOM bank sought legal advice and in February 2004 met to discuss Buckley’s request. Chris Howland, managing director of AIB’s IOM branch, told the meeting that the case for acceding to Buckley’s request was compelling.

“This was because the opportunities to grow the company in the future depended on the Irish authorities drawing a line under the ‘bad name’ offshore has in Ireland once and for all.”

AIB in Dublin, he said, had indicated to him that this was the approach being taken by the Revenue. However, “in order to follow through, the Revenue Commissioners had to produce a satisfactory outcome for the [Dáil] Public Accounts Committee from the requests made to the onshore parent companies regarding their subsidiaries”.

That it would be good “to have the matter sorted once and for all” was a view echoed by the Assessor of Income Tax in the Isle of Man when he and the chief executive of the Financial Supervision Commission met with Howland and another AIB IOM director, Diarmuid Lynes, the meeting heard.

The Appleby documents, seen by The Irish Times as part of the Paradise Papers project organised through the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists, provide a unique insight into AIB Offshore’s battles with the Revenue Commissioners over the past 20 years. File photograph: Jason Alden/Bloomberg
The Appleby documents, seen by The Irish Times as part of the Paradise Papers project organised through the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists, provide a unique insight into AIB Offshore’s battles with the Revenue Commissioners over the past 20 years. File photograph: Jason Alden/Bloomberg

“Mr Howland said that without a fundamental change in the attitude of the Irish authorities, the difficulties in sourcing business from the parent would be likely to remain. Set against this, the potential for growing the company’s business from customers of the parent who are leaving Ireland is of much greater significance than all of the company’s existing sources of business combined.”

Examining debits and credits

By 2005 the Revenue’s inquiries had led it to an account belonging to AIB (CI) with AIB Lansdowne Road, Dublin. A High Court order had been served on AIB and the Revenue was now examining debits and credits on the account above a certain threshold, with a view to identifying AIB customers in the Republic who had dealings with AIB (CI)’s operations in Jersey and IOM.

Rory Farren, then head of operations with AIB Offshore, wrote to senior management of the unit in May 2005 to update them as to what was happening. Where people who made drawings from or lodgments to the account, did so using accounts with AIB in the Republic, identifying them would be achievable, he warned. Where non-AIB accounts were used to cash cheques from the account, that information would also be given to the Revenue. About 5,000 customers affected by the Revenue’s inquiry were to be written to, he said.

Farren advised his colleagues that Revenue was also going to seek court orders in relation to two other accounts held in the Lansdowne Road branch, one belonging to AIB (CI) and the other to AIB in the IOM. The Revenue was also going to seek court orders concerning all AIB accounts held by the offshore subsidiaries with the bank in the Republic in the period 1991 to date, commencing with the two offshore banks’ “vostro” accounts with the AIB in the Irish Financial Services Centre.

Vostro accounts are accounts held by a foreign bank with a domestic bank. Farren’s note included data on recent transactions across the Vostro accounts. In the period 2000 to May 2005, there were outward payments of €1.17 billion from the IOM vostro account, and €1.12 billion from the Jersey vostro account. In relation to both operations, there was a sharp jump in the value of the outward payments in 2004 in comparison with other years. That was the year the Revenue began its offshore products investigation. The total number of outward payments during the period was 72,484.

The leaked files show that the Revenue’s investigations of AIB’s offshore operations created difficulties for the bank’s desire to establish a group-wide IT and data handling system.

In 2006, AIB was introducing a centralised transaction processing and data storage capability in the Republic. In February of that year, Ray O’Connor, the head of group taxation with AIB in Dublin, wrote to Howland in the IOM suggesting that they get legal advice on whether outsourcing their data to the Republic might create a risk for the offshore branch.

“Under current Irish legislation, one relevant point is whether the data could be within the ‘power, possession and procurement’ of AIB plc and therefore within the scope of a potential information request from Revenue. This is not a simple legal principle and would be worthy of discussion between your advisers, [AIB law agent] Bryan Sheridan, and myself,” O’Connor wrote.

‘Significantly repositioned’

Two months later the IOM branch drafted a note on the matter. “The offshore business has been significantly repositioned over the past ten years,” it said. “As a result, banking services are not available to Irish or UK resident, ordinary resident and domiciled individuals. However, in common with other banks, there is a small legacy client base.”

The business now provided services to Irish and UK resident, non-domiciled individuals, most of whom were very wealthy and availed of offshore services due to the attractive taxation position which applies to them in Ireland and the UK.

Given the historic “offshore issues” in Ireland, the generally negative and aggressive press treatment of offshore, and the Irish tax authorities’ approach to this type of business, clients were keen to protect their confidentiality, the note said.

The leaked files give an insight into the sort of business done by AIB’s offshore arm

The location of data in Dublin about clients’ offshore activities could leave the bank exposed to suits from customers and “given the profile and the quality of many of these clients, this could result in significant damages and adverse consequences reputationally”. No access to customer information should be available to AIB in the Republic. “Only in this way can we protect the bank and its customers.”

The leaked files give an insight into the sort of business done by AIB’s offshore arm. A large percentage of the loans issued by AIB in Jersey and the Isle of Man were linked to property owned in the UK and the Republic. When the financial crisis hit, the value of these loans to the banks was severely diminished.

In April 2012, the then State-owned AIB announced it was winding down its operations in Jersey and IOM as part of its plan to become a smaller, domestically focused bank.

As part of the process of running down the two operations, Appleby was engaged to provide management services. The winding down involved dealing with depositors and managing the stressed loan book. Consideration was given to selling the loans, which included loans inherited from Anglo Irish Bank’s IOM operation, but when the loan book shrank in size, from £200 million to £123 million, this became commercially unattractive. So the loans were sold to AIB UK, by way of an operation christened “Project Nora”.

In banking terms a loan due to a bank is an asset, ie it has a value. During the crash, significant reductions in value, called haircuts, were applied to loans that were linked to property or property developers. The National Asset Management Agency paid €9 billion for AIB loans with a book value of €20.4 billion, which is a haircut of 56 per cent.

The leaked documents show that the AIB (CI) loans were sold to AIB (UK) for a price that involved a discount, or haircut, of 32 per cent, following an assessment of their value by PwC. A further 10 per cent discount was then applied to the loans to cover the future cost of administering the portfolio.

According to a note prepared for the board of AIB (UK), the loans were of “broadly acceptable quality, being secured primarily on residential property with a strong loan-to-value ratio.” The note also described the loans as “mainly non-complex property loans”.

As at the end of March 2013, the bulk of the loans were to property companies (£78 million) with personal advances being £24.3 million, home mortgages being £19.7 million, and miscellaneous being approximately £700,000.

Another note prepared for the UK bank said “the typical client base consisted of “UK/ROI domicile (expatriate) [high net worth] individuals and special purpose vehicles managed by trusts and investing surplus income in residential and commercial investment property”.

The note said the bank was working to mitigate the effect of the decision to wind down on its customers. AIB (CI) would remain the “lender of record”, meaning the loans would still be “offshore”.

“Customer tax arrangements will not be impacted. This has been agreed with local offshore tax authorities and KPMG.”

AIB UK, the note added, would be required to comply with the IOM and Jersey data protection laws. Customers who wished to bring their loans “onshore” could discuss this with the bank but customers who required new offshore lending “would be “required to take independent action”.

Deemed problematic

Since taking over the running down of the Isle of Man and Channel Islands businesses, Appleby produced quarterly reports on its work for AIB, including information on its efforts to run down the deposits, and deal with loans. There were accounts that were deemed problematic, including accounts where efforts to contact the owners of the money proved troublesome.

According to the report on AIB (CI) for the third quarter of 2015, the bank’s former IOM and Jersey branches had £6.48 million on deposit for customers who could not be contacted. A further £6 million was in accounts where contact had been made but the client was unresponsive. Suspicious activity reports were to be made in some cases where contacts with the owners of deposits had been made but no steps taken to withdraw the funds.

A spokesman for AIB did not respond to questions about the role played over the years by AIB Offshore, when asked to comment.

“Arising from the recapitalisation and restructuring of AIB, and the European Commission decision on State Aid, it was decided to wind down AIB ISL Limited and AIB CI Limited in 2012,” he said.

The banking licence of both companies was terminated and the administration of both, which is a legal and regulatory requirement as part of the orderly wind down of the banking operations, was migrated to and continues to be carried out by two companies, Estera Trust (Isle of Man) Limited and Estera Trust (Jersey) Limited. The Estera companies were part of the Appleby group until a management buy-out in December 2015.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The 850 Irish Millionaires declared combined incomes of €2.8 billion, or almost €3.4 million each in 2015

All these Millionaires will benefit in full from Government plan to raise threshold for entry to higher income tax band. Those who are self-employed will benefit even more.

Those on less than 33,800 per year (half the work-force) will not benefit at all

Sunday Times 24/09/2017

“Irish millionaires

The Sunday Times also reports that Ireland is home to 850 millionaires, according to the latest figures from the Revenue Commissioners. The number is up 40 per cent in two years. The 850 declared combined incomes of €2.8 billion, or almost €3.4 million each in 2015.”

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Calculation Below: TOP 5% of Earners To Get 58.7 Million in Budget

Government Promises Significant Income Tax Concessions to the Rich but None

 to the Poor in Budget at Fine Gael “Think-In”

Assumptions

1)Threshold above which 40% Marginal rate of income tax applies is increased by 2000Euro. Current threshold is 33,800 for a separate earner and 42,800 for a couple with one earner

2)The self-employed tax credit will be increased by 400 Euro as it was last year

3) There will be no other changes to income tax or USC

4) There are 110,000 taxation units in the top 5% of earners. The average income of these units is 186,000 Euro per year stretching from over 100,000Euro per year to over 2 million Euro per year. A taxation unit is either a separate earner or a couple with one income

5) One Third of top 5% of earners(average income of 186,000) are self employed

INCREASE IN THRESHOLDS

EARNERS ON LOW INCOMES WILL GET NOTHING FROM THE INCREASE IN THE THRESHOLDS!!!

This is because their income are below the current thresholds of 33,800(separate earner) or 42,800(couple with one income ). These account for approximately  50% of all earners.

This is grossly unfair

The Top 5% of Earners will each gain  20% of 2000 Euro

Total Gain=110,000 x 400=44 million Euro

Increase in self-employed Tax Credit

Number of Self-Employed in top 5%=110,000/3=36,666

Total Gain  36,666 x  400=14,666,400=14.7 million euro

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TOTAL GAIN OF TOP 5% from both Measures=58.7 million Euro T

The many low earning self-employed will rightly get 400 Euro Each if they pay tax. But lowly paid employees will get nothing.

Will Trade Union Leaders allow the discrimination against lowly paid employees to happen?

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Government Telling Lies Again This Year on Income Tax Changes!

Government says it will provide tax reductions to those “on Low and Middle Incomes” by increasing the Income Threshold above which the 40% higher rate applies.

LIE!

The 59% of earners (1.3 million) below the current threshold of 33,800 Euro per year will get no benefit whatsoever.

If the threshold is increased by 2000 Euro,, The 1% earning from 200,000 to 2 million per year (22,000) will get 8.8 million Euro between them !This is part of the 46.2 million Euro going to those over 100,000 Euro per year.

In the last two budgets governments claimed that the tax/usc reductions would “be “capped” at 70,000 per year to maximise the benefits to those on low and middle incomes. Butt hey did not tell us that “capped” did not mean that those above 70,000 per year would get no relief. They would get the same as a person on 70,000.

Income Tax and USC Relief To top 5% on High Incomes Over Two Most Recent Budgets Totalled  172 Million Euro

 

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Government Refuses to DEFINITIVELY Close TAX LOOPHOLE USED BY SUPER-RICH TO AVOID 500 Million in Tax

Avoidance to continue While Super-Rich Appeal Circuit Court Decision to High Court

Deputy Seamus Healy  asked the Minister for Finance if he plans to legislate before the summer recess to make certain that a tax-avoidance loophole cannot continue in view of the report in a newspaper (SB POST).  [31794/17]  –This tax scam matter needs to be tackled urgently. It needs to be dealt with through legislation and this should be done before the recess.

Deputy Paschal Donohoe:   This matter is being tackled and dealt with by the Revenue Commissioners.

Full Dáil Exchange Further Down

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200  Irish Super-Rich Individuals (including household names) Evaded 500 million in Tax  !-Sunday Business Post 25/06/2017

Will the Government legislate to close the loop-hole identified by the revenue commissioners now so that  the money-bags cannot continue to benefit while they appeal?

” The Circuit Court in an in-camera (secret-PH) hearing, found that the scheme fell outside the tax code. The tax-avoidance scheme had previously been judged by the Tax Appeals Commissioner. The commissioner had found in favour of the scheme, but then ruled against it, following an appeal by the Revenue Commissioners. The matter was then appealed to the Circuit Court and will now be appealed to the High Court” (by the 200 super-rich-PH) -SB POST

Unlike most Citizens they can afford to appeal again and again!

Why was the case heard in secret?

Will the High Court and following that the Supreme Court Case be also held in private?

No Coverage on Radio, TV, Irish Independent, Irish Times

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Government Allows Super-Rich Tax Scam To Continue Pending Appeal(s) By 200 High Net Worth Individuals

Dáil Report  05/07/2017 Tax Avoidance

  1. Deputy Seamus Healy   asked the Minister for Finance   his plans to legislate before the summer recess to make certain that a tax-avoidance loophole cannot continue in view of the report in a newspaper (details supplied).  [31794/17]

Deputy Seamus Healy:   Since 2011, up to 200 high net worth individuals, in other words wealthy and powerful people in society, including many household names, have been involved in a tax scam allowing them to avoid paying up to €500 million in tax. This involves the transfer of valuable rights attaching to shares in a company to shares owned by its members. I ask the Minister to put a stop to this once and for all by bringing in legislation before the recess to make sure this scam cannot continue.

Deputy Paschal Donohoe:   I assume the Deputy is referring to a recent Circuit Court decision regarding the tax treatment of the transfer of share rights from a company to its shareholders. I am advised by the Revenue Commissioners that section 130(3)(a) of the Taxes Consolidation Act 1997 provides that the transfer of an asset by a company to its members constitutes a distribution for tax purposes. In regard to the case in question, the view of the Revenue Commissioners is that the transfer of rights attaching to shares owned by a company to shares owned by its members amounts to a transfer of an asset and, as such, is a distribution pursuant to section 130(3)(a).

Both the appeal commissioner and the Circuit Court have ruled in favour of the Revenue Commissioners and determined that the transfer of share rights is chargeable to income tax as a distribution in the way I have outlined. It is, therefore, considered by the Revenue Commissioners that the current legislation operates as intended and is sufficiently robust to provide for distribution treatment on such share rights transfers. The Revenue Commissioners will continue to challenge taxpayers who attempt to extract cash from companies in a tax-free manner.

The Revenue Commissioners carry out a robust programme of compliance interventions to minimise the burden on the compliant taxpayer and tackle the non-compliant taxpayer. This involves taking account of all risks that apply to a taxpayer across all taxes and duties. The role of the Revenue Commissioners is to recover any unpaid tax or duty along with interest and penalties.

The anti-avoidance units of the Revenue Commissioners specifically deals with the identification and challenging of aggressive tax-avoidance schemes in the way I have outlined.

Deputy Seamus Healy:   I am simply not happy with the Minister’s reply. My question relates to the future. (TAX APPEALS COMMISSIONER ORIGINALLY FOUND IN FAVOUR OF The SUPER_RICH 200)We understand that this matter has been before the courts. The Circuit Court has found in favour of the Revenue Commissioners but we are aware that there is an appeal pending. We obviously cannot interfere with what happens in the courts but what happens in the future is not a matter for the courts; it is a matter for the Government. It is the responsibility of the Government to introduce legislation to ensure this loophole is closed, and closed for all time. I asked the Minister to do that again.

It is important to remember that the individuals involved are household names. They are very wealthy and powerful and are part of a group with significant financial assets, amounting to €37 billion more than at peak-boom levels. They have done very well out of the recession and the recovery. There is no doubt they have used their position in this regard effectively to be part of a scam against the State and the public generally.

Deputy Paschal Donohoe:   The answer to the question is contained in the Deputy’s own statement. Look at what happened. The Revenue Commissioners became aware of a matter and issued amended tax assessments in regard to it. A challenge was brought to the appeals commissioner and the Revenue Commissioners won. They were then brought to the Circuit Court, where they also won. There was a further appeal. That appeal was heard and the Revenue Commissioners won. Therefore, at each stage of this process when the Revenue Commissioners became aware of this issue and took action thereon, on which action it has been challenged, the law they have used and the way in which they have acted have been upheld. For those reasons, the Revenue Commissioners have advised me that no change to the law is needed as its position is being upheld. As the Deputy will be aware, in the Finance Acts 2012, 2013, 2014 and 2015, action was taken on the advice of the Revenue Commissioners and others to deal with the issue of tax avoidance.

Deputy Seamus Healy:   Again, what I am referring to is the future. It is a matter for the Government to ensure that the activity in question is precluded in the future. The Minister referred to budgets in 2012, 2013 and 2014. Issues arose in those budgets since the profits of banks are now not taxable until 2047. The question of the taxing of vulture funds was addressed in those budgets.(There will be no Capital Gains Tax on Vulture purchases if the property is retained for 5 years-even if it remains empty)

This tax scam matter needs to be tackled urgently. It needs to be dealt with through legislation and this should be done before the recess.

Deputy Paschal Donohoe:   This matter is being tackled and dealt with by the Revenue Commissioners.

 

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Revenue windfall from high net worth individuals

Gordon Deegan Irish Times  Friday, June 30, 2017, 18:11

Eighty two high net worth individuals face a potential tax liability of €43.8 million before interest and penalties.

An investigation by the Revenue Commissioners’ large cases division has identified a number of cases where taxpayers had structured their tax affairs in such a way that they extracted large amounts of cash from profitable trading companies without paying any tax.

In a written Dáil reply to Fianna Fáil finance spokesman Michael McGrath on the issue, Minister for Finance Paschal Donohoe said the Revenue investigation, dating back to 2011, had identified 120 individuals who had taken cash from their companies in this way.

He said a circuit court decision last year regarding the tax treatment of the transfer of share rights from a company to its shareholders has upheld the Revenue’s view that income tax was due on these transactions.

Minister Donohoe said that “82 cases remain open and the amount of tax at stake in these cases amounts to approximately €43.8 million, based on the transfer of share rights valued at over €100 million”.

He said: “It is not possible to quantify the amount of interest and penalties that may become due in relation to the outstanding tax should Revenue be successful in these cases, but any interest and penalties that become due will be calculated in accordance with the relevant legislation.

“As the taxpayers involved are awaiting dates for hearings of their own tax appeals, it is not possible to specify the timeframe for receipt of any such tax, interest and penalties.”

The minister said that, since 2014, a number of taxpayers involved had come forward to settle their cases. The yield in those cases, comprising tax, interest and penalties, amounted to €11.8 million.

Others are currently engaging with Revenue with a view to settling their cases and payments on account have been made in a number of cases amounting to €937,000.

The Minister said the scheme worked primarily by the transfer of valuable rights attaching to shares owned by a company to shares owned by its members.

“Revenue’s view is that the movement in rights attaching to a class of shares owned by a company to a class of shares owned by its members is a transaction chargeable to income tax as a distribution pursuant to section 130(3)(a) of the Taxes Consolidation Act 1997.

Revenue has raised amended income tax assessments on the taxpayers involved on this basis, the Minister said, and a number of those taxpayers appealed the Revenue assessments to the Appeal Commissioners.

One of the appeals was heard before an Appeal Commissioner last year and the Commissioner determined that the transfer was chargeable to income tax.

The appellant subsequently sought a rehearing of the appeal before the Circuit Court but the court also determined that the transfer was chargeable to income tax.

Minister Donohoe said: “The appellant in the aforementioned case has requested a case stated to the High Court.”

© 2017 irishtimes.com

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Why Doesn’t the Government cancel the concession to the super-rich, end the lock-out and re-open the schools?

Income Tax and USC Relief To  High Incomes Over Two Most Recent Budgets Totalled  172 Million Euro

Government Concession to Top 5% of Income recipients (110,000 units) with average incomes of 186,000 EU per year

( Assuming One third of units or c. 37,000 in this high Income bracket  are self-employed- There were 85,000 self-employed with paid employees and 231,000 without employees active in irish economy in 2014)

Budget 2017

                Employee Gain 353 Eu    Self Employed Gain  753 eu

Top 5 %   Average income 186,000 Eu  Number of Units    110,000                Tot Gain

Employees              73,333               25,886,549

Self-employed               36,667              27,610,251

All                                                 53,496,800

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Budget 2016

 

Employee Gain 902 Eu    Self Employed Gain    1452Eu

Employees          73,333                 66,146,366

Self-Employed        36,667               53,240,484

All                  119,386,850

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Concession To Top 5%  Over  2 Years     All               172,883,650

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Irish Economy 2014: Number of employees remains below bailout quarter of 2010
By Michael Hennigan, Finfacts founder and editor
May 27, 2014 – 6:08 AM
Email this article
Printer friendly page

All self-employed       318.3

Employees(Including Schemes)                    1,541.2

Schemes                                                              85.0

Actual Employees                                                       1,456.2

Actual Self Employed +Actual Employees    =        1,774.5

% Self-Employed                                            =  18%

 

Budget First Time  Buyer Scheme immediately Drives up House Prices-Developers, Auctioneers are the only ones to Benefit as Widely Predicted

“Within hours of the Budget speech, a number of houses advertised on property websites jumped by between €17,000 and €45,000.

The Irish Independent identified three new homes, whose purchasers will qualify for the new scheme, which rose in price.”  Irish Independent  14/10/2016


BUDGET 2017:HIGHEST  INCOMES ATTRACT  HIGHEST TAX/USC RELIEF

Minister Noonan: Tax and USC reductions have been targeted at those on low and middle incomes”

NOT TRUE !!!

Full Text of Budget Speech of Seamus Healy TD  Below

Those over an annual income of 70,000 Euro are getting 146 million  in Tax/USC Relief or almost 50% out of total relief of 300 million in Budget

The 300,000 over 70,000EU per year are getting at least 40 million more in tax relief than the 324,000 in the 30,000 to 40,000 category (average industrial wage 36,500).

A TD is getting an extra 7 euro per week from Jan 1

 A person on average industrial wage(36,500 per year) is getting an extra 3.42 Euro per week

A person on minimum wage (18,720 per year) is getting Tax/USC relief of 2 Euro per week

 A rich business person on 200,000 per year is getting 14.5 euro per week from Jan 1

An adult social welfare recipient including pensioners is getting a social welfare increase 5 Euro from March 1 which is equivalent to 4 Euro per week from Jan 1

Budget Speech-Seamus Healy TD

Listen Live on you tube https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=ftt9wX2daRI

 

Deputy Seamus Healy: Information on Seamus Healy Zoom on Seamus Healy In his Budget Statement, the Minister, Deputy Donohoe, told us the budget will create a fairer society. This is dishonest claptrap. The budget maintains and widens the rich-poor gap in our society. Under the tax and the universal social charge changes alone, the wealthiest 5% of people in our society, those on average incomes of €186,000 a year, will get a €15 per week increase and, of course, they will get it from 1 January. They are not subject to any wealth tax and neither are they subject to any assets tax, even though net financial assets have increased and are now higher than peak boom levels. They have increased threefold from €69 billion in 2008 to €192 billion in 2015.

The budget also provides for outrageous increases to politicians, to which I am opposed. It provides for an increase of €15,000 for the Taoiseach of the day, an increase of €11,000 per annum for a Minister and €5,500 for a Deputy in the House. Compare this to how our old age pensioners were treated in the budget. Pensioners on a little over €12,000 per annum will receive an increase of €5 a week, but not until March. This is less than what they received last year. Despite the promises of the so-called Independence Alliance, there is no return of the telephone allowance, no increase in fuel allowance, no increase in the household benefits package and no increase in the living alone allowance.

This budget is socially divisive and deeply unfair.

It means that a total of 750,000 people continue to live in poverty in this country; one in five children will live in households with incomes below the poverty line; one in four of those living in poverty is a child; almost 20% of those whose income is below the poverty line are working and they are the working poor; since 2007 the deprivation rate has almost doubled; and, therefore, that 1.3 million or 29% of the population live in a state of deprivation. This budget, once again, protects and supports the rich and powerful in our society while low, middle income and poor families are doomed to live from hand to mouth.

This budget is a pretence. In it, the Government is pretending to determine public expenditure and taxation in the State. The reality is that revenue from all sources will be approximately €50 billion. The House is determining the disposal of only less than €2 billion or 4% of the total. The EU powers, through the fiscal treaty, have determined the disposal of the other 96%. The charade being enacted here tonight flies in the face of the 1916 Proclamation, which declared “the right of the people of Ireland to the ownership of Ireland, and to the unfettered control of Irish destinies, to be sovereign and indefeasible”. The Government, similar to the outgoing Government, has sold our sovereignty to the EU.

The Minister for Finance recently told the Committee of Public Accounts that the EU powers insisted on the rapid sell-off of NAMA properties, even though retaining them would have led to higher prices being achieved for the taxpayer. Together with the sell-off of assets by banks, it is probable that there is now greater foreign ownership of Irish assets than when British landlords owned all the land. Effectively there is no sovereignty residing in the State.

The various proposals in the budget in respect of health, housing and education are grossly inadequate. Housing is a fundamental right of human beings, but, shamefully, the Taoiseach has written to the EU seeking permission to borrow the money required to build social housing. Ireland does not have even the sovereignty to house its own people. The Government has also refused to formally declare a housing emergency, something that is necessary to deal with the housing crisis. It is essential under the Constitution but the Government through banks it owns, other banks, and landlords, including vulture funds, is continuing to evict people. As a result, unfortunate families have been devastated by suicides.

Unnecessary deaths will continue in our hospitals despite heroic efforts by staff. According to the Irish Medical Organisation, IMO, hospitals are now operating in “the death zone” where occupancy levels are in many cases more than 92.5%, which is leading to significant increases in mortality rates. Despite the intense efforts of front-line staff, in particular, once occupancy rates reach this level, deaths occur that would not otherwise happen. Ireland needs an additional 3,500 inpatient hospital beds immediately to bring us in line with the western European average. By abiding by the fiscal treaty, the Government is causing unnecessary deaths and unnecessary pain.

With regard to education, class sizes in the primary sector are the highest in the eurozone. The programme for Government makes a specific commitment to smaller classes, but the budget proposals are inadequate. The pre-cut capitation rate should be restored immediately. In primary and second level schools, the full pre-cut quota of assistant principal and special duties posts must be restored in the interest of pupils. Our third level system is grossly underfunded and being continuously damaged. Today’s measures are grossly inadequate to solve these problems.

At a time the Government cannot deliver safe hospitalisation or housing, or halt evictions and related suicides, it is farcical that an additional €255 million must be contributed to the EU budget this year. In his presentation to the Committee on Budgetary Oversight, the Minister for Finance confirmed that the financial emergency is over. This was also recently re-certified by the Minister for the Public Expenditure and Reform. The confiscation of public service pensions under the FEMPI legislation is, therefore, unconstitutional. The right to private property of pensioners in their pensions must be fully restored immediately. This is not provided for in the budget. In addition, the pension reductions imposed on occupational pensioners in State bodies and in the private sector must be restored.

The budget is a joint effort by Fine Gael, the so-called Independent Alliance and Fianna Fáil. Fianna Fáil has taken responsibility for this shameful and socially divisive budget. The problems relating to health, education, housing, roads and various other public services will not be resolved until Irish sovereignty as set out in the Democratic Programme of the First Dáil of 1919 is re-established. This requires the political defeat of the austerity parties, Fianna Fáil, Fine Gael and the Labour Party, and those prepared to support or to coalesce with them in the framework of the fiscal treaty. It is important to recall what the Democratic Programme of the First Dáil said. It stated, “We declare in the words of the Irish Republican Proclamation the right of the people of Ireland to the ownership of Ireland, and to the unfettered control of Irish destinies, to be indefeasible, and in the language of our first President, Pádraig Mac Phiarais, we declare that the Nation’s sovereignty extends not only to all men and women of the Nation, but to all its material possessions, the Nation’s soil and all its resources, all the wealth and all the wealth-producing processes within the Nation, and with him we reaffirm [remember this] that all right to private property must be subordinated to the public right and welfare.” That sentence is particularly relevant to the housing crisis and the need immediately to formally declare a housing emergency.

Chris Johns   Irish Times   12/10/2016

Taking fiscal powers away from politicians and giving it to technocrats, similar to the way interest rates are now set by independent central bankers would appear to be an undemocratic step too far. But the reality is that we have done this already: the annual budget doesn’t matter much in the overall scheme of things – €1.3 billion is not that big a deal – because of rules set by Brussels. All of the furore is really the narcissism of small differences.

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Government Covering-Up Names of Irish True Owners of Tax-Dodging Off-Shore Companies as Charities Call for Disclosure

Noonan is lobbied over Revelations in Panama Papers-Jack Horgan Jones, Sunday Business Post, May 1, 2016

Minister for Finance, Michael Noonan is coming under pressure to force the publication of the true owners of companies which are used to shelter in revenue from taxation authorities.

A letter sent to Noonan by heads of some of Ireland’s biggest charities and tax reform campaigners, which has been seen by Sunday Business Post, calls on him to establish a register containing the names of true or “beneficial owners” of these companies.

The charities including Christian Aid, Oxfam Ireland, Trocaire and Social Justice Ireland, are calling on Noonan to establish a list as part of the transposition of EU anti-money laundering rules, which is currently ongoing.

It comes after this newspaper revealed last month that powerful lobby groups including the Law Society and the Irish Funds Industry Association, were seeking to restrict new rules around the disclosure of beneficial ownership.

The signatories (of the letter to Noonan rom the charities) are Father Sean Healy of Social Justice Ireland, Patricia King, the general Secretary of ICTU, Siobhan McGee, the chief executive of Action Aid and Jim Clarken, the chief executive of Oxfam, as well as the leaders of Christian Aid, ATTAC and Transparency Ireland.

In the letter, they argue that the transposition of the EU Directive “comes at a time of unprecedented public demand for increased transparency from corporations and individuals, and offers the government a timely opportunity  to respond to public anger at what was exposed by the Panama Papers.

 

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Panama Papers and the Irish Super-Rich

“The leaked data includes more than 300 offshore companies linked with Irish addresses, hundreds of Irish shareholders and beneficial owners, and numerous cases of Irish passports used in Mosack’s due diligence process.

The ICIJ said early next month it will release names of the more than 214,000 offshore entities, as well as beneficiaries, shareholders and directors connected to them. An exact date has not been disclosed. The actual documents in the files will not be published.”–Colm Keena, Irish Times, 13/04/2016

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State Intensely Lobbied by Funds Industry and Law Society not To Name Off-Shore Trust Holders

Sunday Business Post  April 10, 2016 Jack Horgan-Jones and Ian Guider

The state has come under intense pressure to water down new rules that would reveal the true owners of shell companies.

Such companies were shown by last week’s Panama Papers leak to have facilitated widespread tax shelters.

Lobby groups have been pressing the Department of Finance not to allow public access to a register of the owners of the so-called beneficial trusts.

Campaigners say a central register of those who own these trusts, which is required under a new EU law, would allow the Revenue Commissioners to discover if they are being used to evade tax.

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John McManus: TDs have much to gain from publishing their tax return

http://www.irishtimes.com/opinion/john-mcmanus-tds-have-much-to-gain-from-publishing-their-tax-returns-1.2608140?mode=print&ot=example.AjaxPageLayout.ot

Irish Times  Last Updated: Wednesday, April 13, 2016, 01:10  John Mc Manus

British prime minister David Cameron has been bounced into disclosing his tax returns by the Panama Papers revelations. His finance minister George Osborne has followed suit, as did mayor of London Boris Johnson. The leader of the opposition, Jeremy Corbyn, has done likewise.

The expectation is that other well-heeled members of the British cabinet and campaigners in the Brexit referendum will come under pressure to do the same. Publishing your tax returns could well become a titillating fixture of British politics. The alarming trend towards tax transparency among UK politicians will – if nothing else – give the opposition on this side of the Irish Sea a stick with which to beat the government.

It is inevitable – if it has not already happened – that someone will call for Enda Kenny to make his tax affairs public should he succeed in putting together a government, if not before. And if his, then why not Micheál Martin’s?

But given our long and not so glorious tradition of accepting very low standards in public life, you have to wonder what difference it would make if our public representatives had to show us their tax returns?

Allegations

Michael Lowry, whose complex tax affairs have become public knowledge by default, is a case in point. The Tipperary deputy is currently facing trial over allegations, which he denies, that he filed incorrect tax returns in 2003 and 2007.

During his long career he has featured in two tribunals of inquiry, an authorised officer’s inquiry into his refrigeration company, Garuda, a substantial Revenue inquiry that ended in 2007 only to be reprised two years ago, an ongoing inquiry by the Criminal Assets Bureau and numerous court hearings. All have involved public funds being spent on trying to find out what Lowry has been up to while holding public office.

From a tax perspective, the highlights include his availing of the 1993 tax amnesty without disclosing his offshore accounts. He also made a €1.4 million settlement with the Revenue.

Despite this – and to no great surprise – Lowry was elected on the first count in the recent election. He stood as an Independent – as he has done in the past five elections – but was quick to pledge his support for Fine Gael and Kenny.

His support for Kenny now seems to be taken as a given by Fine Gael in all of the possible scenarios that might see Kenny elected taoiseach this week or next. His name is first on commentators’ lists of Independents that would vote for Kenny and see him elected if Fianna Fáil abstain from the vote.

This is despite Kenny emphatically ruling out seeking the support of Lowry when it came to forming a government in the run-up to the election. He told Morning Ireland on Friday, February 5th, that “I will not have any dealings with Michael Lowry or any other Independent.”

Kenny’s ruling out of Lowry’s support came after he had been wrongfooted by Martin, who in a clever move ruled out relying on Lowry a few weeks earlier in the campaign.

Martin, of course, now finds himself relying on Lowry by proxy because his preferred outcome – a minority Fine Gael government – requires Lowry’s support.

So we have arrived at a situation where a politician whose tax record is something less than pristine – to put it mildly – will be an instrument in the formation of the next government.

Not only that, he is likely to be able to deliver for his “people”, as he likes to call them, over the duration of the government.

The read-across from this is that any Irish politician looking over his shoulder at developments in the UK should not worry.

Local dynamic

However, it is not that simple. Lowry is probably a one-off. A phenomenon built around a charisma that most of the urban elite cannot fathom, combined with a local dynamic that is equally baffling to outsiders.

Pragmatic self-interest must be one of the reasons – perhaps the main reason – why the people of Tipperary voted for him despite his chequered financial past. That is the essence of democracy. As things stand they have been vindicated in their choice.

The intriguing question is whether we would elect more politicians like Lowry if we were privy to the same sort of information about their financial affairs. Maybe we don’t want to go there.

We might not like what find.

 

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FINE GAEL PROMISE MORE TAX CUTS FOR SUPER-RICH

Fine Gael to promise further USC reductions if re-elected

Fiach Kelly

Irish Times Monday, November 23, 2015, 01:00

Fine Gael is to promise voters it will further reduce the main rate of the universal social charge in its first budget if returned to office after the general election.

The promise is expected to be a key element of the party’s general election manifesto and will be outlined by Taoiseach Enda Kenny in a pre-election message to Fine Gael members this week.

The move follows Mr Kenny’s commitment to abolish the USC in its entirety during the lifetime of the next government, and shows that Fine Gael will immediately position itself in favour of tax cuts over increases in public spending.

Minister for Finance Michael Noonan has estimated that the so-called fiscal space, the amount of money available for tax cuts and spending increases, available for the 2017 budget will be significantly less than the €1.5 billion package for next year announced in October.

Initial estimates are that as little as €500 million could be available for 2017, although Ministers and Coalition sources have said this is a conservative figure.

Rate of USC

The main rate of USC drops from 7 per cent to 5.5 per cent from January, following changes announced in Budget 2016, and Fine Gael’s commitment will be to reduce it further in the next budget, although the exact level of reduction has not been finalised.

The rate applies on earnings between €18,600 and €70,000.

The Revenue Commissioners estimate a 1 per cent decrease in the 5.5 per cent USC rate will cost the State €253 million in the first year and €348 million in a full year.

Fine Gael sources have indicated its manifesto will also contain measures to broaden the tax base, raising the prospect of increasing other taxes to pay for the USC reductions.

Echoing the Conservative Party campaign in this year’s British general election, Fine Gael will emphasise its “long- term economic plan”, with a cut to the main rate of USC as an immediate offering to voters.

The recovery

While the USC cut in next year’s budget is being cast by one source as a “short-term step to keep the recovery going”, there will also be “longer-term plans to rebuild services and end the boom-and-bust cycles that wrecked the Irish economy twice in the last generation”.

The manifesto will outline steps to be taken over the next decade to sustain “steady growth and sensible management of the public finances on jobs, public services and incomes, not just over the life of the next government”.

Mr Kenny will also this week announce the establishment of a team to finalise the plan, as Fine Gael sets out a distinct election position.

Mr Noonan will lead these efforts, along with Minister for Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation, Richard Bruton, and Simon Harris, Minister of State at the Department of Finance, who will focus on issues affecting younger people, such as housing, personal tax and emigration.

Initial Department of Finance estimates outlined by Mr Noonan to the Dáil had suggested that as little as €500 million will be available for tax cuts and spending increases in the next budget.

The figures show how pressures on spending from an ageing population and pay rises agreed under the Lansdowne Road deal will reduce the room for manoeuvre of the next government.

High earners ‘benefit most from tax changes in the Budget’—TASC

More than half the income gains of the last five years have gone to the top tenth of earners, a think tank has stated. 

Irish Examiner Monday, November 09, 2015 – 01:12 am

More than half the income gains of the last five years have gone to the top tenth of earners, a think tank has stated.

Think-tank for Action on Social Change (TASC) added that falling public spending will undermine the ability of public services to deal with social crises.

TASC policy analyst Cormac Staunton said: “While income tax and Universal Social Charge mitigate this, the regressive nature of the tax changes announced in Budget 2016 give the greatest benefit to higher earners, and undermine the ability of the tax system to deal with rising market inequality.”

The report said three-quarters of the pre-tax income gains in the last five years have gone to those earning €70,000 and above.

Key findings of the analysis include:

* A single earner on €70,000 will gain €902 per year which is 2% of their take home pay.

* A single person on a middle income of €25,000 will gain €227 for the year, about 1% of their take-home pay.

* A person on €35,000 will gain €377 – just over 30 per month or 1.3% of their take home pay.

In the run up to the Budget, TASC recommended focusing on increased public spending rather than on tax cuts.

Report co-author and TASC policy analyst Dr Rory Hearne said: “While there are some welcome announcements, particularly in the area of childcare, the increase in spending is insufficient to address the various social crises and austerity-related underinvestment.

“The spending allocations for future years show that there are no plans for significant increases and that spending will in fact fall as a proportion of GDP.

“According to the Government’s own figures, by 2019 we are likely to end up with the lowest government expenditure in the EU at just over 30% of GDP, against a Euro area average that will be closer to 50%.”

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As Top 5% on 180,000 each get 920 Euro Each

Economic and Social Research Institute Says Budget Will Do Nothing To Help The Poorest

The ESRI a says the budget will do nothing to help the poorest section of society, which made no real income gain as a result of its measures.

This group is generally not earning enough to benefit from tax or USC cuts, and there was no general increase in welfare rates, although there was a hike in the Christmas bonus.-Irish Times

BUDGET:As Water Charges and Home Tax continue, FG/Lab Give 100 million To the Top 5%

The USC package gives the top 5% of earners, 110,000 individuals earning over €180,000, an additional €922, costing the Exchequer almost €100 million or nearly twice what they were given last year. In contrast a low-paid worker on €18,000 gets a paltry €124 per year and someone on €25,000 gets a paltry €247 a year. An old age pensioner will get €3 a week or €156 a year, about one sixth of what a person on €180,000 is getting.

The ICTU, in its pre-budget submission had provided the government with a mechanism to confine tax relief to those on low and middle incomes-A USC tax credit for those individuals under 70,400 or 140,800 for a couple

And households, even the most needy, will be required to pay water charges and LPT on their homes.

And Noonan promised if re-elected to deliver the Kenny  bonanza out lined below to the super-rich,a reduction of over 2% in the marginal rate

Kenny’s Promise-Nobody Will Pay More Than Marginal Tax Rate of 50%- would give 140 million to top 10,000 Incomes 

Kennys Promise       < 50%    eg  49.5%  =   Income tax  38.5% + USC 7%+PRSI 4%

Full Calculation Below

Current Top Marginal Rate       40% Income tax +8%USC +4% PRSI on employee Income only=Total  52%

Assume lower tax band to be increased by 1000E as last year

USC For person on 595,000      Balance above 52,468=542,532 @1% reduction =5,425

Typical Private Sector Employee Pension Contribution    6%

Top 10,000 Average Income   595,000 (PQ Reply Ml Noonan)

Tax Band increased by 1000E       Net Gain    40-20=  20% of 1000=500E

Example :Gross income 595,000  Salary 495,000  Investment Income 100,000

Annual Gain of Single Person          13,982 Eur

Total Gain of Top 10,000                      139,820,000 Eur

 Tax Calculation   Single Person

 

    2015   2016
Annual salary (after pension contributions) 465,300 465,300
Social welfare pension 0 0
Investment income 100,000 100,000
Income from trade/profession 0 0
BIK – company car 0 0
BIK – preferential loans 0 0
BIK – other 0 0
Gross income 565,300 565,300
Tax payable 33,800 @ 20% 6,760 34,800 @ 20% 6,960
531,500 @ 40% 212,600 530,500 @ 38.5% 204,243
Total tax liability 219,360 211,203
Less: Personal tax credits (3,300) (3,300)
Less: Medical insurance relief (0) (0)
Net tax due 216,060 207,503
PRSI 23,800 23,800
Universal social charge 46,044 40,619
Local property tax 0 0
Water charges 0 0
Total deductions 285,904 271,922
Annual disposable income 279,396 293,378
Monthly disposable income 23,283 2,448
Weekly disposable income 5,373 5,803
2015/2014 Budget comparison
Annual Gain EUR 13,982
Monthly Gain EUR  1165

 Tighter measures net €60m more tax from high earners

More than 900 people with six-figure incomes were obliged to contribute more

Irish Times Aug 31  Carl O’Brien

Hundreds of high earners who tried to use tax breaks and shelters to maximise their income ended up paying over €60 million tax under measures introduced in recent years.

The high-income individual’s restriction was introduced following controversy that wealthy individuals were paying little or no tax.

IRISH NAMES IN SWISS  LEAKS

RTE NEWS Monday Feb 9, 2015

Leaked documents from the Swiss branch of the HSBC bank show that 350 clients associated with Ireland held more than €3bn in accounts with the subsidiary.

Details from HSBC’s private bank in Switzerland show bankers advised clients on how to keep money hidden from national authorities.

It also offered deals to help tax dodgers to stay ahead of the law. The bank says it has now changed.

350 people associated with Ireland held 892 accounts with HSBC in Geneva worth a total of €3.1bn.

20 Irish account holders have since made settlements with the Revenue Commissioners worth over €4.5m.

Irish names in HSBC bank’s secret files

International clients include those involved in arms trade and blood diamonds

The bank’s management admitted that standards were not as they should have been in HSBC Geneva, but claiming that new management is working to improve the culture in the Swiss bank.

Colm Keena

Irish Times

Mon, Feb 9, 2015, 08:14

First published:Sun, Feb 8, 2015, 21:00

A huge cache of secret files from the Swiss branch of one of the world’s largest banks includes Irish people who made tax settlements with the Revenue Commissioners for more than €4.5 million. Other clients include arms dealers who sold munitions to African child soldiers, traffickers in blood diamonds, and associates of third world dictators.

The files, which cover accounts with HSBC Private Bank in Geneva holding more than $100 billion, have led to investigations around the globe resulting in massive tax settlements. They were given to the Revenue Commissioners by the French authorities in June 2010 and have now been seen by The Irish Times.

Since 2010, the information has led to 20 tax settlements here for a total of more than €4.5 million, and to three successful prosecutions for tax offences, with a fourth case pending.

However in contrast to the authorities in FranceBelgium andArgentina, the Revenue Commissioners decided that there was not enough evidence in the files to justify a case being taken against HSBC Private Bank, Geneva, on charges of aiding and abetting tax evasion.

One in eight of our super-rich are tax exiles, reveals Revenue

The official number of “tax exiles” is 10,781

While we await publication of the allegations of failure to investigate cases of tax evasion by high profile individuals by a senior civil servant, it is well to recall the information on tax evasion by the Irish rich which is already in the public domain.

Immediately below I carry an article from the Irish Independent in 2012 and further down there is a link to the Category A list of Ansbacher off-shore account holders from the Blog INDYMEDIA in 2009

http://www.independent.ie/irish-news/one-in-eight-of-our-superrich-are-tax-exiles-reveals-revenue-28824422.html

Of the 450 “high wealth” individuals, 54 are resident abroad for tax purposes.

This is the first time the tax authorities have released figures relating to how many Irish tax exiles are in the super-rich league.

Revenue said that last year its “high wealth” section dealt with 450 individuals who have net assets worth more than €50m and non-residents with “substantial economic interests” in Ireland.

It said the “number of non-resident individuals that are considered by Revenue to be high-wealth individuals is currently 54”.

Membership of the “54” club is confidential. But some of Ireland’s biggest business figures are known to have moved their bases to generous foreign tax shelters. This means they only have to pay tax on Irish earnings and not on their worldwide income.

Denis O’Brien, the telecoms entrepreneur and significant stakeholder in Independent News & Media (INM), is tax resident in Malta. Dermot Desmond, the founder of NCB stockbrokers and another shareholder in INM, is tax resident in Gibraltar.

Michael Smurfit, the paper packaging tycoon, has moved to Monaco while the racehorse magnates JP McManus and John Magnier are both tax resident in Switzerland. The supergroup U2 moved part of their business from Ireland to Holland after the Government capped the tax exemption scheme for artists.

In contrast, Michael O’Leary, the Ryanair chief executive whose wealth is estimated at €438m by rich lists, famously said he is happy to pay his taxes here.

While the official number of “tax exiles” is 10,781, some are people who moved abroad, rent their homes and pay tax here on the rental income. Others are foreigners working for multinationals here, or who have investments here.

Collectively they generated €49m in tax last year although it’s not clear how much the super-rich club of 54 contributed.

The issue of tax exiles has riled the taxpaying public, according to recent research by the Labour Party which showed that tax exiles were one of the main issues exercising voters. The Government plans to examine the issue of tax exiles in the Budget, with Labour pressing to tighten up the residency rules.

To qualify as “non-resident”, they must spend less than 183 days a year in Ireland, or 280 days over two years.

Remember the Ansbacher Account Holders!!!

Category A List       http://www.indymedia.ie/article/7689?search_text=Ansbacher

Categories: Uncategorized

Tipperary Issues

November 10, 2014 Leave a comment

Picture: Roskeen Barracks, Co Tipp in Flames; Fenian Rising 1867

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WUAG Pat ENGLISH elected on First Count with surplus. WUAG gained 600 votes on 2014 result.  WUAG is Deeply Integrated into the Local Communities  https://wp.me/pKzXa-oG

Image may contain: 15 people, including Michael Cleere, Teresa Johnson, Pearl Sheehan, Pat English and Paddy Healy, people smiling, people standing

So proud of the Workers and Unemployed Action Group and especially our candidates Pat EnglishTeresa Johnson and Michael Cleere. Three amazing people doing fantastic work in their communities. I know Michael and Teresa will continue their work and continue to be a huge part of the WUAG team and 2024 isn’t too far away 😃. Congratulations to Pat on his election to Tipperary County Council. Huge changes on the council and now with so many right wing voices taking seats it’s going to be very difficult to fight increases in rates, local property tax etc. but I know Pat won’t be sitting down and found wanting. Well done to the teams of canvassers, the volunteers, Carmel and Louise in the office, the management team, our Chairperson Ken, Secretary RósPaddy and Seamus Healy our TD, Director of Elections, Organiser, Advisor, Supporter, Confidante and Friend. The WUAG are an amazing group of people, loyal friends for life, and all sincerely caring and wanting the best for everyone in their community.

———————————————————–UPDATE ON FIGHT FOR MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES IN CO TIPPERARY

There are no in-patient services in any part of Tipperary now. The services in Kilkenny and Ennis are overcrowded, undermined and not fit-for-purpose.

Seamus Healy TD  https://wp.me/pKzXa-oG
The Save Our Acute Hospital Committee of which I am chairperson fought the closure of St Michaels In-Patient Psychiatric Unit in Clonmel from the first day it was announced. The Minister of the day was John Moloney, Fianna Fáil. We mobilised patients, patients families, GPs, consultants, and the public against it but the closure was forced through by Kathleen Lynch Labour Party TD and Junior Minister in the Fine Gael/Labour Party austerity government in 2012.
We also fought the closure in the High Court and in the Supreme Court without success.
Everything we predicted has unfortunately transpired.
There are no in-patient services in any part of Tipperary now.
The services in Kilkenny and Ennis are overcrowded, undermined and not fit-for-purpose.
Admission for Tipperary patients for these units is delayed. They are the subject of inappropriate early discharge and there are huge difficulties for families travelling to support patients.
The position in the Kilkenny unit is absolutely shocking and the HSE has been prosecuted convicted and fined recently in the courts arising from a report of the Mental Health Commission.
We in the Save Our Acute Hospital Committee have not given up.
I have raised this issue CONSISTENTLY in the Dáil.
My intervention last week arose from the reporting of the court case mentioned above.
In the last few months, our committee has had Minister Jim Daly in Clonmel on this issue and we have met him twice in Leinster House.
We have arranged a further meeting with him on the 1oth April next.
We have also met senior officials from the HSE on a number of occasions.
The current state of play is that the Minister has asked for a report from the HSE on the options for the reopening of inpatient psychiatric beds in Tipperary. He has acknowledged that the closure of St. Michael’s Unit was wrong and the HSE accepts that there is a shortage of inpatient psychiatric beds.
You can be assured that we will be continuing our efforts to reopen beds in Tipperary.
We will not give up.
Our Committees record speaks for itself.
We put 15,000 on the streets of Clonmel and stopped the Department of Health and the HSE transferring our medical, surgical, maternity paediatric and accident and emergency services from South Tipperary General Hospital to Waterford and Kilkenny.
We are the ONLY committee in the country to have succeeded in this: PEOPLE POWER SUCCEEDED.
We will get inpatient psychiatric beds back to Tipperary.
Regards,
Seamus Healy TD

—————————————————–Tipperary Live :’Absolutely shocking’: Tipperary TD, Seamus Healy demands re-opening of St. Michael’s Psychiatric Unit  in Clonmel Following Conviction of HSE in Court Due to State of St Lukes (Kilkenny)  https://wp.me/pKzXa-oG

March 8:TD Seamus Healy (Tipperary) has called on the government to reopen in-patient acute psychiatric beds in Clonmel that never should have been closed

In the Dáil, Deputy Healy, addressing the matter following the conviction in court imposed on the HSE relating to the physical conditions in the department of psychiatry of St. Luke’s General Hospital, Kilkenny, demanded the re-opening of beds that were lost to South Tipperary with the closure of St. Michael’s in 2012.

The 44-bed department of psychiatry based in St. Luke’s General Hospital, Kilkenny, is the designated approved centre for acute in-patient services for south Tipperary since the closure of St. Michael’s.

Referring to the conditions of St. Luke’s as outlined in court, Deputy Healy told the Dáil: “The details are absolutely shocking. Most of those who know and have worked in the unit are satisfied that this is the case.

“The closure of St. Michael’s was opposed by everybody, including nurses, doctors, patients and the public. All advised against it and warned about the difficulties and dangers that would ensue.

“Unfortunately, we were not listened to, and now the unit (St.Luke’s ) is not fit for purpose and continuously overcrowded. Patients are admitted to sleep on couches and mattresses on the floor.

“South Tipperary patients admitted to the unit are delayed on an ongoing basis and they suffer from inappropriate early discharge. There are also transport difficulties.”

He acknowledged the work of the Minister of State Jim Daly, who had accepted that the decision to close St. Michael’s unit was wrong.

Tanaiste Simon Coveney in response said he was expecting the HSE to submit a detailed report in the near future, and he will then consider the options available to improve acute capacity in Tipperary.

Tanaiste Coveney said remedial works were already under way at St. Luke’s with €1 million being spent. Extra staffing resources have also been allocated to the unit.

Deputy Healy replied that it is accepted by the HSE and the Minister of State Jim Daly that there are not enough psychiatric inpatient beds in the South East.

“It is 20 beds short. We want some of the beds back in Tipperary. We want the Government to reopen beds in Clonmel. This is the tip of the iceberg. We have been waiting for inpatient beds for far too long. They should never have been closed”

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150 years since Fenian Rising in Tipperary  March 5, 2017-Nenagh Guardian

https://wp.me/pKzXa-oG

(Paddy Healy From Archives, Nenagh Guardian, August 3, 1867)

(My Great Grandfather Michael Healy  Knockaun, Upperchurch, Tipperary N.R.

Fenian Rebellion 1867: Michael Healy and two neigbours -Thomas Whelan and Laurence Butler were convicted of giving rifle cover to those who burned down Ruskeen RIC Barracks. They were jailed in Nenagh. (See Nenagh Guardian, 3 August, 1867)

(My Great Grandmother: Margaret Healy (Nee Whelan-Shefferoy)) Walked 30 miles to Nenagh Every Week to Bring Michael Provisions while in Jail-Family Memories)

Remembering the Fenian Rising in Tipperary

Nenagh Guardian,Wednesday, 1st March, 2017 2:32pm

Roskeen Barracks, one of several barracks that were attacked and burned by the rebels on March 5th 1867.

View More Images

Sunday March 5th marks the 150th anniversary of the Fenian Rising of 1867.

Ormond Historical Society and Borrisoleigh Historical Society have joined forces to mark this important milestone in Irish revolutionary history. Although one more in the list of unsuccessful military uprisings against British rule, the Fenian rising was a significant event, both nationally and in Co Tipperary. The episode was one which would help to shape the future of Ireland. The Irish Republican Brotherhood members, who were the guiding hand in staging the 1916 Rising, which eventually lead to Irish freedom, took their inspiration from the leaders of the Fenian revolt of 1867.

Taking from the successful celebration of the centenary of the 1916 Rising last year, the intention is to engage communities in this commemoration which, as well as the events on the anniversary date of March 5th 2017, will involve subsequent activities and displays on the Fenians in Tipperary. This is a non-party political event marking the historical significance of the Fenian Rising and honouring those men and women who inspired later generations to persist in the struggle for the Irish Republic which we enjoy today. We invite everyone young and old to join us in Borrisoleigh on Sunday afternoon, March 5th, for a celebration and commemoration in word, music and image of this seminal event in our history

 

On March 6th 1867, readers of the Nenagh Guardian were shocked to read the following: “Considerable alarm was occasioned in this town yesterday by the report which was currently circulated that a rising of the Fenians was expected to take place last night, and this was increased by the intelligence that a large body of troops had been despatched to the Tipperary Junction from the Curragh. We understand that letters had been also sent to several of the leading families in this neighbourhood, informing them of the state of affairs and suggesting to them the expediency of leaving their houses and going into some of the towns for protection. Acting on this advice, several of the gentry, with their families, immediately left for Limerick, some repaired to Dublin, while more came into this town and took lodgings at the hotels. In the evening it was further rumoured that captain Gleeson, brother of General Gleeson, arrived the previous evening by a late train at Thurles, accompanied by over 100 men who immediately separated, and went into different parts of the country.”

 

The loyal citizens of Nenagh and North Tipperary might well have been alarmed, but they had ample warning over the previous two years that mischief was afoot. In January 1865 the town was put on notice when soldiers in the Military Barracks at Summerhill were placed under arms due to fear of an impending revolt. In October, Andrew Kennedy of Old Turnpike, Nenagh, was arrested on a charge of swearing in a Fenian. A letter found on Kennedy resulted in Francis Patrick Cleary, a medical student, ‘late of Nenagh’, being arrested in Dublin. Also arrested at this time were Thomas Devane, Thomas Clarke, John Cormack, Matt Noonan, Denis Horan, Thomas Reddan and James Hanley, all of Nenagh, Owen Coffey of Rathfalla, George Ryan and Timothy Brien of Five Alley, Nenagh, and James Hegarthy of Portroe.

 

Four months later, on February 17th 1866, the focus shifted to Borrisoleigh, with the arrest of two brothers, Gen John Hassett Gleeson and Capt Joseph Gleeson. Both were veterans of the Union Army of the United States and had fought in the American Civil War. The file on the Gleesons states that they were in Thurles on October 10th 1865 “in the company of Maj. O’Shea and two other officers of the Federal Army, along with Kirwan, Carrol and Burke”. The same day they are reported “energetically engaged” in Borrisoleigh with known Fenians. Constable Ebenezer Ferns reported in December that “before the Gleesons came to Borrisoleigh there were no Fenians there”. He also stated that they were residing in the house of Edward Finn, “where Fenians assemble”. A week after the arrest of the Gleesons, Finn was also arrested and remained in custody until May 23rd, when he was released on bail.

 

Following their arrest, the Gleeson brothers were detained in Nenagh Gaol where Joseph Gleeson remained until he was released in September 1866 on condition he left Ireland immediately for the US. His brother John was transferred to Kilmainham Gaol and then moved to Mountjoy where he remained until July 24th. Upon his release he was put under army escort and conveyed to Queenstown (Cobh) where he was put aboard a ship, bound for America.

 

Returning to the events of March 1867, the Guardian report went on to detail how Captain Brady and soldiers of the 2nd Regiment were patrolling the suburbs of Nenagh and the town itself was being patrolled by Constabulary under Sub Inspector Reamsbottom. The failure of the mail car to arrive from Templemore at the scheduled time of 5am caused further alarm for the residents. Their anxiety was not eased in any way by its eventual arrival at 9.30am, when the driver conveyed the grim news that he had been delayed by the failure of the mail train to arrive from Cork. Subsequently it turned out that the train had been derailed south of Thurles.

 

In the same article the aforementioned Captain Gleeson was reported to have marched at the head of 200 men through the streets of Borrisoleigh around nine o’clock the previous night. Clearly he was a rather amazing individual as he was credited as arriving by late train to Thurles also. The Borrisoleigh contingent were reported to be armed and were accompanied by two carts “laden with arms, pikes, &c”. The Guardian also reported that there had been disturbances in Thurles which left five dead. In addition, it was also stated that large numbers of Fenians were to be seen in the area around Barnane.

 

The events of March 1867 are well documented in the archives of the local newspapers and in the National Archives where records from the Chief Secretary’s Office in Dublin Castle contain a large volume of documents relating to the Fenian rising. We find John Bayly, chairman of the Nenagh district magistrates, writing to the Chief Secretary on March 6th requesting additional troops be sent to Nenagh in order to contain the situation. He writes again the following day, obviously on foot of a refusal, emphasising that he is speaking on behalf of sixteen magistrates and pressing “the necessity that exists of forthwith increasing that force in consequence of the very alarming state of the surrounding districts”.

 

In Roscrea a similar situation existed with Sandford Palmer writing on behalf of his fellow magistrates, James S Birch, Frederick A Jackson and James Hollister. Again the plea was for the Chief Secretary, Thomas Larcom, to send additional troops to the local barrack. Meanwhile, in Thurles John Gore Jones RM had sprung into action on receipt of a communication from Wm Carden of Barnane, which stated that a large force of Fenians had been observed heading towards the Devil’s Bit. Jones’ letter to Dublin Castle stated that he had gone in pursuit of this band accompanied by Inspector O’Connor of Templemore along with a troop of constabulary and a detachment of the 31st Foot.

When they reached Barnane they heard that the Rebels were headed towards Dovea. Jones and his men immediately went in pursuit and at Dovea they encountered their quarry and set about dispersing them. Observing an attempt by 60-70 men to outflank the military, Gore Jones ordered the Constabulary to open fire. According to his report the rebels scattered following the first volley.

 

Unfortunately for the organisers of the planned rising, their efforts to enlist serving soldiers and members of the constabulary in the Fenian organisation had been counterproductive. While they had been successful in persuading a large number of soldiers along with some serving and former members of the constabulary to join their ranks, they had also attracted some men who pretended to have transferred their allegiance to the rebels but in truth remained loyal to the Crown. These men fed back plans for the rising to local magistrates, police inspectors and army officers. Consequently, the authorities were prepared and on a war footing as soon as the rising commenced.

 

A letter from Martin Ffrench to Larcom, the Chief Secretary, clearly illustrates the degree of preparedness which the authorities enjoyed. Ffrench states that he was advised on March 3rd by Mr De Gernon RM that the rising would take place on the 5th and that Thomastown Castle would be seized before the rebels advanced on Tipperary Town and seized the contents of the banks. On foot of this warning, he had placed a total of thirty-two policemen in Thomastown Castle.

Further communications from the police in Carrick-on-Suir give details of a constable named Talbot who infiltrated the movement and who was feeding back the details of planned operations in the South Tipperary/Waterford area. One message from Talbot gives details of the planned arrival of the Fenian leader James Stephens in Carrick-on-Suir, following his escape from prison. In the event, Stephens failed to show; whether it was due to knowledge of Talbot’s treachery or not is not clear. Talbot was subsequently killed by the Fenians.

 

Despite the fact that the plans had been divulged to the authorities, the planned rising went ahead on March 5th. Several thousand men ‘came out’ that night in various places around the country, including Dublin, Louth, Cork, Clare, Limerick and Tipperary. In Tipperary there were attacks on police barracks at Ballingarry, Emily, Gortavoher and Roskeen, where the rebels succeeded in burning the barracks.

A large group of rebels, armed with pikes, assembled at Ballyhurst, near Tipperary Town. They were led by Colonel Thomas F Bourke of Fethard. A brief battle with soldiers of the 31st Regiment under command of Magistrate De Gernon resulted in one man being killed and several wounded. Some managed to escape, but many were captured and sent to Clonmel gaol to await trial. Within the week, all rebel activity had been crushed and the remnants of the rebel band were pursued through snow covered Tipperary countryside by Flying Columns, one of the more successful columns being led by Inspector Mullarkey of Borrisoleigh.

 

By March 16th, large numbers of prisoners – some estimates say 200 – were lodged in the County Gaol in Nenagh. Several hundred were also detained in the County Gaol for the South Riding at Clonmel. On March 21st it was reported that one Michael Sheehy of Upperchurch had been captured at Queenstown attempting to board an American bound ship. At the time, Sheehy was dressed as a woman. The local Resident Magistrates and Justices of the Peace commenced lobbying the Government for a Special Commission to try those arrested.

 

On July 8th, when the North Tipperary Assizes opened in Nenagh, the caseload consisted mainly of Fenian outrages connected with the rebellion. Sixty-two people were finally charged with taking part in the rebellion in North Tipperary. On Wednesday July 31st, guilty verdicts were returned in the cases of the following prisoners: Guilty of Treason Felony: Ptk Leahy, 5 years penal servitude; Capt Wm Sheehy, 20 years penal servitude; Wm Bourke, 12 months penal servitude; John Dermody, indicted for being in arms; Daniel O’Connell, Garraun, Toomevara, two years hard labour. Forty-seven other prisoners were remanded on continuing bail.

 

August 1867

(Paddy Healy From Archives, Nenagh Guardian, August 3, 1867)

(My Great Grandfather Michael Healy  Knockaun, Upperchurch, Tipperary N.R.

Fenian Rebellion 1867: Michael Healy and two neigbours -Thomas Whelan and Laurence Butler were convicted of giving rifle cover to those who burned down Ruskeen RIC Barracks. They were jailed in Nenagh. (See Nenagh Guardian, 3 August, 1867)

 

(My Great Grandmother: Margaret Healy (Nee Whelan-Shefferoy)) Walked 30 miles to Nenagh Every Week to Bring Michael Provisions while in Jail-Family Memories)

Jeremiah Bourke, at whose grave in Glankeen, we are commemorating the Fenian, rising was born a short distance from the ancient monastery of St Cualain where he now rests. Born during the Famine years of the 1840s, he was just a young man when he joined the Fenian Brotherhood. Going in search of arms, he and a group of his Fenian comrades were surprised by a police patrol near Templederry village. The police, aware of their plan, allowed them pass and then opened fire, wounding Bourke and capturing his colleagues. All were tried and sentenced to various terms of imprisonment.

 

Jeremiah Bourke was still alive when his children’s generation started their revolt in 1920 in Tipperary. Bourke’s home in Templederry was a safe house where the famous Tipperary fugitives Sean Treacy, Dan Breen, Seamus Robinson and Sean Hogan were sheltered. In the 1918 General Election he was one of the many Tipperary proposers of Joseph McDonagh’s candidature. He became a respected judge in the Sinn Féin courts set up to replace the ascendancy controlled courts, which had sentenced him and his Fenian colleagues 50 years earlier. He was noted for being impartial and intervened in a number of cases where he saw sectarian motives behind operations planned by the IRA.

 

When he died in September 1933 Jeremiah Bourke was the last survivor of the Tipperary Fenians of 1867.

 

 

Foundation of the Fenians

 

Following the abortive Young Ireland rising of 1848, William Smith O’Brien and several of the leadership were arrested. Two of the leaders who succeeded in evading capture were John O’Mahony of Kilbeheny, Co Limerick and James Stephens of Kilkenny. Slipping out of Ireland, they made their way to Paris where they remained for some years. In 1853 O’Mahony made his way to New York where he founded the Emmett Monument Association, linking up with Michael Doheny and others from the Young Ireland Movement. In New York he went on to found the Fenian Brotherhood

 

Stephens remained in Paris for a further three years, returning to Ireland in 1856. The following year he was encouraged by O’Mahony to establish a similar organisation in Ireland and funds were promised from Irish supporters in America. Encouraged by O’Mahonys’ support, Stephens established the Irish Republican Brotherhood at a meeting in Dublin on St Patrick’s Day 1858. The meeting was held in Langans of Lombard St and present were Thomas Clarke Luby, Peter Langan, Charles J Kickham, Joseph Denieffe and Garrett O’Shaughnessy. The organisation was established on the basis of ‘Circles’, with each Circle under the control of a ‘Centre’. In 1863 they commenced publication of ‘The Irish People’ newspaper. The editors of the paper included, Charles J Kickham, Thomas Clarke Luby and John O’Leary. The paper remained in circulation up until its suppression by the government in 1865.

 

Author: John Flannery

 

Enforced Exile for Fenians…

 

 

 

As well as those arrested and imprisoned, other Tipperary Fenian,s fled to America to escape the wrath of the harsh, landlord-dominated Justice system in the aftermath of the failed Fenian Rising on March 5th 1867.

 

It was in a letter dated April 21st 1867 (Easter Sunday), that Killadangan farmer Dan Darcy wrote to his brother-in-law James Maloney in Illinois, USA, explaining that his eighteen year old son, James Michael Darcy, was on his way to America. He was seeking Maloney’s support when young Darcy would turn up on his door-step. Although the letter does not make an explicit connection with the Fenian Rising six weeks earlier, the Darcy family lore is that James was indeed fleeing Tipperary as a result of his rebel activity.

 

Young James Darcy had a long revolutionary pedigree. His grandfather Mortimer Darcy was flogged publicly in Nenagh in the aftermath of the United Irishmen’s revolt in 1798. A hundred years earlier, in 1691, a previous generation of the D’arcys had fought on the Jacobite side at the Battle of Aughrim.

 

Dan Darcy was a strong farmer on fine limestone land overlooking the Nenagh river where it flows into Dromineer Bay on Lough Derg. He was married to Bridget (Biddy) Maloney, daughter of another strong farming family in the parish, William and Bridget Maloney of Crannagh in nearby Monsea. One of the latter couple’s younger sons, James, born in 1825 had emigrated to America in October 1851. According to Darcy’s letter, sixteen years later, he was “a man of influence” who might help his son to get a position. Darcy explained that his son had “gone through a full course of Arithmetick, Algebra and Euclid (Geometry) and Mensuration” and was “reckoned to be a boy of good capacity”!

 

The information relating to this case of a Tipperary Fenian fugitive fleeing to America was confirmed in 1991 by Theresa Moloney who wrote from her home in Illinois to a priest in Tipperary after she found the correspondence to her ancestors in an attic. The letters were shared with the current generations of Darcys and Maloneys and provide an invaluable source of information on wider family connections. While correspondence confirms James Michael Darcy’s arrival in Illinois, it does not trace his subsequent life in America or if he re-established links with the extensive and active Fenian movement among the Irish community in the US.

 

Perhaps inspired by the family lore of their Fenian uncle, the children of three of James Michael Darcy’s siblings were certainly all involved when the next generation of Ireland’s republican movement took up the flag in the 1917 -21 period. His sister Margaret’s son, Ned O’Leary of Beechwood, was on the staff of North Tipperary County Council and was involved in setting up Sinn Féin/ IRA units all over North Tipperary. He was appointed commander of the Flying Column of the No 1 (North) Tipperary Brigade IRA in October 1920. He led the small IRA group which shot British military officer Lt Hambleton at Casey’s Cross, outside Nenagh on November 4th 1920. He also commanded an IRA ambush at Kilcommon on December 16th 1920 in which four policemen were killed. He later joined the National Army and after that was in the Land Commission. The son of another sister, Mary Ann Costello of Garryard, was captain of Borrisokane company of 4th Batt IRA. His brother Dan’s son (of Grange), also named Dan, was involved with the IRA in UCG where he was in college during the Troubles.

 

The path of flight to America that was used by James Darcy was one that was much used by Irish rebels through the generations. In 1916, when Michael O’Callaghan shot dead two policemen at Monour in West Tipperary during the Easter Week Rising, he succeeded in escaping to America. After the attack in Solohedbeg on January 21st 1919, in which two policemen were also killed, the IRA group involved changed the course of Irish history by refusing the traditional route of ship’s passage to America, staying on the run in Tipperary (and Dublin). Their adventures and engagements with Crown Forces subsequently became the opening stages of the War of Independence.

 

If you have family stories linked to the Fenians or other generations of Irish rebels, or their opponents, please let us know at the events in Borrisoleigh this Sunday or by contacting your local historical society.

 

Author – Seán Hogan, with assistance from Mike Darcy, Kildangan and Liam Maloney, Crannagh.

 

 

Schedule of this Sunday’s events:

1.45 – 2.15pm: Park and assemble at Ballyroan Bridge (Nenagh side of Borrisoleigh). A small number of cars can be facilitated to bring those in need of transport to Glankeen.

2.15 – 2.45pm: One mile Fenian Walk from Borrisoleigh to Glankeen Graveyard. Children invited to bring small bunches of daffodils to place on the Fenian graves.

2.55pm: Piper (Joe Barry of Templemore Pipe Band) and Colour Party will lead the assembly into Glankeen Graveyard from the public road.

3pm: Event convenor Seán Hogan will call the assembly to order and outline the programme of events; 3.05pm: The Fenian Proclamation, forerunner of the 1916 Proclamation of an Irish Republic, will be read by Clare Hanley, great-grandniece of Jeremiah Bourke.

3.10 – 3.15pm: Wreaths laid on behalf of Borrisoleigh and Ormond Historical Societies and by the Bourke family on the grave of Jeremiah Burke; children called forward to lay flowers on the graves of others (for example, Seamus Burke); 3.15pm: Blessing and Prayer by Fr Liam Everard, PP, Borrisoleigh.

3-25pm: Oration at the graveside of Jeremiah Bourke by Tipperary historian John Flannery, President, Ormond Historical Society; 3.30pm: Songs by Paudie Bourke, great grandson of Jeremiah Bourke (‘Templederry my Home’ and ‘The Bold Fenian men’).

3.30 – 3.35pm: ‘Last Post’ and ‘Reveille’ by Peter Rowley-Brooke and the National Anthem will be played by piper Joe Barry.

3.35 -4.15pm: Return walk to Borrisoleigh and move to Borrisoleigh Community Centre for event hosted by Borrisoleigh Historical Society. A series of archive photographs of Tipperary Fenian prisoners will be on display, and the public will be invited to bring and display historical family mementos and memorabilia relating to their ancestors and the Decade of Centenaries.

4 – 4.30pm: Tea and refreshments in Borrisoleigh Community Centre, courtesy of Borrisoleigh Historical Society; 4.30pm: Convenor calls order for second part of events of the day

4.35pm: Presentation of commemorative plaque by Michael Delaney, Chair, Borrisoleigh Historical Society, to Derry Bourke, grandson of Jeremiah Bourke.

4.40pm: Lecture by John Flannery – ‘The Fenian Rising in Tipperary’; 5.15pm: ‘Voices of the Fenians’ – St Joseph’s Secondary School Transition Year students; 5.30 – 5.45pm: Fenian songs.

5.45 – 6pm: Facilitated reflection and discussion on event; 6pm: formal event closes.

 

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Tipperary Snubbed in National Development Plan-Seamus Healy TD

Despite the hype and the fan-fare, the Fine Gael plan has almost entirely snubbed County Tipperary. Like Fianna Fáil’s National Spatial Strategy before it, no Tipperary town is earmarked as a growth centre or prioritised for investment or job creation.

https://wp.me/pKzXa-oG

Instead, Cork, Limerick, Waterford, Galway, Sligo, Athlone, Letterkenny, Drogheda and Dundalk are the urban areas favoured for future growth.

This means these towns and cities will have key strategic and economic advantages over all towns in County Tipperary.

An Taoiseach Leo Varadkar’s spin machine, “The Strategic Communications Unit”, funded by taxpayers, choreographed the launch of the National Planning Framework: Project Ireland 2040 on Friday. A more realistic title would read, “National Planning Framework: Pie-in- the-Sky- 2040”. Despite the hype and the fan-fare, the Fine Gael plan has almost entirely snubbed County Tipperary. Like Fianna Fáil’s National Spatial Strategy before it, no Tipperary town is earmarked as a growth centre or prioritised for investment or job creation.
Instead, Cork, Limerick, Waterford, Galway, Sligo, Athlone, Letterkenny, Drogheda and Dundalk are the urban areas favoured for future growth.
This means these towns and cities will have key strategic and economic advantages over all towns in County Tipperary.
Put another way, Tipperary towns will be systematically discriminated against.
In effect, Limerick, Cork and Waterford in particular will suck the lifeblood, the investment, the growth and the jobs from Tipperary.
Motorway status for the N24 Roadway has also been ignored for the umpteenth time. The N24 is a key economic and social driver for the South of the County but it is also sub-standard and is dangerous in many areas.
Tipperary town will continue to be choked by thousands of vehicles including heavy goods vehicles driving through its main street. There will be no by-pass either for Carrick-on- Suir.
The Fine Gael/Independent Alliance government, supported by Fianna Fáil, has made a deliberate political choice to discriminate against Tipperary.
The plan in reality re-announces 179 projects and €40 billion expenditure, with the rest fuzzy, un-costed and with little or no time-line.
Expenditure of €116 billion is used to give the impression of a significant increase in spending but when population growth and use of Gross National Income instead of Gross Domestic Product are taken into account, the investment proposed is modest at best, rising from 2.9% in 2018 to 4.1% in 2027, still below the European average.
The much-hyped Climate and Energy section of the plan will, by the Taoiseach’s own admission, miss the EU Climate and Energy agreed targets by a whopping 60%. He also raised the prospect of new taxes in this area.
And the plan’s promises on housing are frankly, incredible, given the governments appalling record to date. Fine Gael has presided over an unprecedented Housing and Homelessness crisis, with sky-high rents, continued repossessions and home ownership being out of the reach of ordinary families.
The Government are fooling no-one with this plan.
I will be raising these issues strongly on the floor of the Dáil during the week and demanding the inclusion of growths centres in Co. Tipperary and the upgrade of the N24 to motorway status.
087 2802199
052 6121883
seamus.healy@oir.ie

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Article from TWO YEARS AGO! Now Student Accommodation is even Dearer!

Kelly Challenged on Affordable Student Accomodation for Tipps

UCD Students’ Union President hits out at “unresponsive” Minister Alan Kelly

Op-Ed by Marcus O’Halloran, President of UCD Students’ Union and Tipperary native for Tipperary Times. UCD Students’ Union is the largest students’ union in Ireland. (Read Piece- Scroll Down to July 2015!!)

NOW, two years later, students heading back to Colleges and Institutes are  facing even higher rental costs and two months rent as deposit as well!!! This is the outcome of political decisions by all recent governments to put protecting the huge and growing financial assets of the Irish Super-Rich from any tax above the right to housing and accommodation!

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Seamus Healy Demands 40 extra Beds at South Tipp Gen Hospital-Shocking Reply By Taoiseach

Taoiseach:   Good clinical leadership is just as important if not more important. We need all of those things because constantly putting more resources, staff and capacity into a system which is not led or managed well will not be enough.

Seamus Healy TD  “ The Taoiseach’s reply is absolutely disappointing and unacceptable. As the Taoiseach, the HSE, the management of the hospital and the management of the south-south west hospital group well know, the situation in South Tipperary General Hospital is absolutely atrocious despite heroic efforts by staff.”

Full Dail Record  11/07/2017

Deputy Seamus Healy:   South Tipperary General Hospital is a progressive, forward-looking and efficient hospital, but it has a major problem with a lack of bed capacity. Simply put, there are not enough beds to cope with the number of admissions. That this is a problem has been accepted by hospital management, the regional HSE management and the South/South West hospital group management.

The figures are shocking. In 2011, there were 750 patients on trolleys in the hospital. In 2016, there was a sixfold increase to 4,419. Today, at the height of the summer, there are 22 patients on trolleys in the hospital’s corridors. If that is the case today, what in God’s name will it be like in the winter and autumn months?

Of course, we know what it will be like. It will be chaos, as it was last winter, the winter before and the winter before that. The hospital is bursting at its seams. It is operating at 130% of its capacity overall while the medical department is operating at 150% of capacity. Everybody’s preferred option for solving this problem in the medium term is a 40-bed inpatient modular, or hotel-type, unit of accommodation.

Numerous Ministers have visited the hospital in recent years. The former Minister, Senator Reilly, the Taoiseach and, in October of last year, the current Minister, Deputy Harris, have visited. When he visited, the Minister for Health said that the situation was utterly unacceptable, that a solution had to be found and that we would have a decision before the end of the year. We are, however, still awaiting that decision.

Will the Taoiseach personally take up this matter and deal with the situation at the hospital? There is absolutely no privacy for patients on trolleys in corridors. The staff of the hospital are under huge pressure. As I said, the hospital is bursting at the seams and approval for this 40-bed unit is awaited. Will the Taoiseach ensure that the provision of such a unit is approved as a matter of urgency? Will he begin the process today?

The Taoiseach:   A look at this morning’s trolley figures, which are provided by the HSE, shows that there were 272 patients on trolleys this morning compared to 373 on the same day last year – a reduction of approximately 100. Obviously, I appreciate that if a person is one of the 270 patients who are on trolleys – or a family member of such a patient – that figure is of no benefit because of the enormous distress and inconvenience that being on a trolley causes. I appreciate the very difficult working conditions which our staff in emergency departments have to endure, but a reduction from 373 last year to 272 this year – a reduction of more than 100 year on year – is quite significant.

I have been to South Tipperary General Hospital. It is certainly in need of very significant investment. Like many hospitals in the country there is a new section, which is very much up to standard, and an old part, which is very much not. The Department of Health is conducting a bed capacity review which will establish how many additional beds we may need across our acute hospitals. Building new hospital blocks and new hospital wings takes several years. Even just the planning, tendering and construction could take three to four years before any new blocks could come on train. In addition to that, the Department of Health is working on proposals to provide temporary accommodation in a number of hospitals, the like of which the Deputy has mentioned. It is of course just not good enough to provide temporary accommodation, it must be possible to staff it as well. This time last year, we encountered difficulty in staffing all our beds. That proposal is now being worked up by the Minister for Health and we will see if it is possible to put it in place later this year.

I will make a point on the figures from the Irish Nurses and Midwives Organisation in respect of patients on trolleys in the first half of this year. Those figures were very interesting. They show an overall increase across the country, but huge variations from hospital to hospital. Beaumont Hospital and Connolly Hospital had the lowest number of patients on trolleys since records began and St. Vincent’s University Hospital had the second lowest. This is despite two of those three hospitals getting no additional beds whatsoever, whereas some hospitals which got additional beds actually disimproved considerably. That demonstrates to us that providing more staff and more beds on its own does not work. As politicians and as people who make decisions on behalf of the public, we should all acknowledge this. Good clinical leadership is just as important if not more important. We need all of those things because constantly putting more resources, staff and capacity into a system which is not led or managed well will not be enough.

Deputy Seamus Healy:   The Taoiseach’s reply is absolutely disappointing and unacceptable. As the Taoiseach, the HSE, the management of the hospital and the management of the south-south west hospital group well know, the situation in South Tipperary General Hospital is absolutely atrocious.

Everyone accepts the hospital’s lack of bed capacity. This may be the fifth year that various Ministers and Ministers of State gave promised additional beds at the hospital. It is time to bite the bullet. The patients attending South Tipperary General Hospital are entitled to good quality hospital services but they are not getting them.

I understand that a senior medical professional from the South/South West hospital group carried out a forensic analysis of the hospital’s bed capacity and has accepted that 35 to 40 additional acute beds are urgently needed at the hospital. I believe the report has gone to the HSE and that senior management of the HSE is now sitting on it, so to speak. Will the Taoiseach ensure the report is acted upon and made public. Approval should be given for beds at South Tipperary General Hospital, not at the Mater Hospital or anywhere else nationally but at South Tipperary General Hospital where there is an agreed and accepted necessity for additional beds.

The Taoiseach:   When there are additional beds, one of the most important things to do is to staff them. We are hiring more staff. Some 700 additional nurses will be hired this year alone, allowing us to open beds that may have been closed temporarily and also to facilitate patients being discharged more quickly, thus allowing beds to be used by more patients and to have faster turnover of beds.

The national bed capacity review is not completed yet and we need to complete it. I do not believe a bed capacity review can be done in isolation. As hospitals have overlapping catchment areas, it needs to be done on a national basis. However, I am told it is very far advanced.

I mentioned earlier that providing new blocks or new hospital wings can take a number of years. For example, a new one has just been opened in Galway, providing 75 more beds. A new emergency department in a new block in Limerick has been opened in recent months. A new emergency department and an acute floor have opened in Kilkenny in recent months. All these things took many years to plan and build. Even if we approved additional hospital blocks now, it would take a number of years to build.

Deputy Seamus Healy:   We are not asking for a block. We are asking for temporary accommodation, which is accepted by everyone.

An Leas-Cheann Comhairle:   The Taoiseach has exceeded his time.

The Taoiseach:   Temporary accommodation can provide capacity quickly at under pressure hospitals. That is being actively considered by the HSE and the Minister at the moment, but it needs to be worked through.

 

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Shocking Neglect Of Job Creation in County Tipperary by Government!

Tipp Town(34.0%) and Carrick-on- Suir (29.2%) are UNEMPLOYMENT BLACKSPOTS!-Census Results CSO

Co Tipperary is bottom of the Table for IDA Jobs per Head of population  of the 7 Counties Across the South East and Mid-West Regions

Co Tipperary is 1 from bottom of the Table for IDA Jobs per head across  the 26-counties of Ireland

Co Tipperary has second worst Unemployment in Munster after Waterford City and County

Emergency Action by Government is Needed Now!

The following 26 areas have unemployment levels 5% or more   above the national average of 12.9%:

Unemployment rate of all Electoral Divisions (ED’s) within Tipperary (Census 2016)   CSO
Electoral division name Electoral division number Population aged 15 years and over Unemployed In the labour force Unemployment rate Black

Spot

Tipperary East Urban 23087 1954 336 989 34.00% 1
Carrick-on-Suir Urban 23083 3550 590 2022 29.20% 1
Clonmel West Urban 23086 4681 582 2290 25.40% .
Farranrory 23145 385 55 217 25.30% .
Cashel Urban 23084 1984 252 1117 22.60% .
Mullinahone 23150 668 82 375 21.90% .
Tipperary West Urban 23088 1500 186 866 21.50% .
Thurles Urban 22004 5594 645 3026 21.30% .
Fethard 23104 741 87 410 21.20% .
New Birmingham 23151 339 41 194 21.10% .
Ballingarry 23141 553 66 315 21.00% .
Carrickbeg Urban 23082 1154 145 701 20.70% .
Littleton 22071 862 100 485 20.60% .
Killenaule 23109 949 102 499 20.40% .
Roscrea 22059 4939 602 2956 20.40% .
Nenagh East Urban 22001 2442 299 1534 19.50% .
Graigue 22014 233 26 138 18.80% .
Nenagh West Urban 22002 4306 493 2623 18.80% .
Poyntstown 23152 144 15 80 18.80% .
Borrisokane 22008 1012 103 553 18.60% .
Finnoe 22013 151 16 87 18.40% .
Ballyphilip 23142 347 35 192 18.20% .
Kilcommon 23125 1730 187 1026 18.20% .
Templemore 22003 1576 151 843 17.90% .
Greystown 23107 335 36 205 17.60% .
Clonmel East Urban 23085 3298 331 1922 17.20% .

NO PART OF The County is Left  UNTOUCHED BY THIS BLIGHT!

 

The neglect of Co Tipperary by successive governments is clear from the recent census results issued by the Central Statistics Office(CSO). The average unemployment in Co Tipperary at 14.6% is worse than that in Limerick City and County which has 18 Blackspots and well above the national average! A blackspot is local area which has unemployment of more than 27%. The unemployment rates of 34.0% in the Eastern Part of Tipperary Town and 29.2% in Carrick-on-Suir, the two Co Tipp blackspots,  are truly shocking. Co Tipperary at 14.6% is the 12th worst of the 30 administrative counties in the state. This compares with a rate of 7.4% in the administrative county of  Dun Laoire-Rathdown.

A presentation given to the Minister for Jobs in April this year shows that Co Tipperary is bottom of the Table for IDA Jobs per Head of population  of the Counties Across the South East and Mid-West Regions  and is  1 from bottom of the Table for IDA Jobs per head across  the 26-counties

Co Tipperary has no gateway or  preferred  employment hub designated by the Industrial Development Authority (IDA) for inward investment-unlike Counties Cork, Limerick and Waterford

Following disastrous job losses in recent years-over 1000 in the last two years alone,I have repeatedly called on the Minister for Employment in the Dáil to end this discrimination against Co Tipperary without success. I now repeat my call to the new Minister , Frances Fitzgerald, to bring forward special measures to eliminate the blackspots and to give Co Tipperary it’s fair share of government spending and IDA jobs. There was not a single new local authority house built in the county in the last twelve months!

I call on Co Tipperary Co. Council to call a special meeting to prepare a campaign  to demand government action to reduce unemployment in the county and to eliminate Unemployment  Blackspots

I call on all CO Tipperary Dáil deputies to end all voting support or abstention in favour of the Government until Co Tipperary gets Fair Play On Jobs

Seamus Healy TD

Unemployment rate of all Electoral Divisions (ED’s) within Tipperary (Census 2016)   CSO
Electoral division name Electoral division number Population aged 15 years and over Unemployed In the labour force Unemployment rate Blackspot 2016
Tipperary East Urban 23087 1954 336 989 34.00% 1
Carrick-on-Suir Urban 23083 3550 590 2022 29.20% 1
Clonmel West Urban 23086 4681 582 2290 25.40% .
Farranrory 23145 385 55 217 25.30% .
Cashel Urban 23084 1984 252 1117 22.60% .
Mullinahone 23150 668 82 375 21.90% .
Tipperary West Urban 23088 1500 186 866 21.50% .
Thurles Urban 22004 5594 645 3026 21.30% .
Fethard 23104 741 87 410 21.20% .
New Birmingham 23151 339 41 194 21.10% .
Ballingarry 23141 553 66 315 21.00% .
Carrickbeg Urban 23082 1154 145 701 20.70% .
Littleton 22071 862 100 485 20.60% .
Killenaule 23109 949 102 499 20.40% .
Roscrea 22059 4939 602 2956 20.40% .
Nenagh East Urban 22001 2442 299 1534 19.50% .
Graigue 22014 233 26 138 18.80% .
Nenagh West Urban 22002 4306 493 2623 18.80% .
Poyntstown 23152 144 15 80 18.80% .
Borrisokane 22008 1012 103 553 18.60% .
Finnoe 22013 151 16 87 18.40% .
Ballyphilip 23142 347 35 192 18.20% .
Kilcommon 23125 1730 187 1026 18.20% .
Templemore 22003 1576 151 843 17.90% .
Greystown 23107 335 36 205 17.60% .
Clonmel East Urban 23085 3298 331 1922 17.20% .

From Presentation of Co Council T Minister For Jobs

  • Tipperary  – population of over 159,553 (CSO 2016)
  • National unemployment currently at 6.8% (2017)
County / Town Population Unemployment (Live Register M1 2011)* Unemployment (Live Register M1 2017)* 2017 As a % of Town Population Level of Deprivation (2011 CSO)
Tipperary County 158,754  CSO 2011
Nenagh 8,439 3055 2,029 24% -21.8
Clonmel 15,840 2150 1921 12% -20.5
Thurles 7,933 2946 2216 28% -17.5
Carrick on Suir 5,931 2836 1284 22% -22.7
Roscrea 5,403 1446 985 18% -21
Tipperary Town 4,355 1798 1245 29% -25
*live register is not directly applicable to the town area and accommodates those also outside of that area

 

Recent Job losses

  • The above listed towns have been subjected to a number of recent closures (and impacted by other longer term closures for which there were  no replacements) which include
    • Ranbaxy (Tipperary MD) – 120 –  (2016)
    • Suir Pharma (Clonmel MD) – 135 –  (2016)
    • Schiele & McDonald Mushrooms (Tipperary MD) – 70 –  (2016)
    • Vedanta Holdings (Thurles MD) – 400 – (2015)
    • M&J Gleeson (Thurles MD) – 120 – (2015)
    • COTY (Nenagh MD) – 220 – (2017-2018)
  • In Addition to these recent closures, Tipperary Town with the closure of Tambrands, Pall, Atari and Namco over the last 20 years has never had any substantive replacement industry and the town has suffered considerably as a result. With the exception of MSD, Carrick on Suir has never had any substantive employer since facilities such as Sram (Bicycle parts) closed in early 2000.
  • FDI investment in the old North Tipperary area has also been weak (with exception of First Data)
  • In a recent IBEC study Tipperary ranks 25th out of 26 counties in terms of IDA jobs per 10,000 labour force with the national average being 461

IBEC LOCAL ECONOMIC INDICATORS-South East and Mid West Regions

 

 

CSO Census 2016 Report  : At administrative county level, Longford had the highest unemployment rate in 2016 (19.6%) while Dún LaoghaireRathdown had the lowest (7.4%). The overall unemployment rate fell by 6.1 percentage points to 12.9 per cent in 2016 from 19.0 per cent in 2011. When examined on a county level, Donegal showed the largest change, decreasing from 26.2 per cent in 2011 to 18.0 per cent in 2016, followed by Monaghan which fell from 20.6 per cent in 2011 to 13.0 per cent in 2016. At the other end of the scale Dún Laoghaire-Rathdown showed the smallest change decreasing from 11.2 per cent in 2011 to 7.4 per cent in 2016.

 

Paddy Healy    The unemployment rate in Co Tipperary is 14.6%  The national Average is 12.9 % Which is also the rate in Dublin City Corporation area.   Tipperary is 1.7% above the national Average

Worst is Longford at 19.6%           Best is Dun Laoire-Rathdown—7.4%

Cork City  15.0  Cork County Less than 10.3%      Waterford City and County  15.4%

 

If Cork City and County are taken together, Waterford City and County is the worst in Munster, Co Tipperary is next worst.

Co Tipperary(14.6%) at  12th worst county of 30 Administrative Counties in  is Nine Places worse than Dublin City at 21 st which is at the national average of 12.9%

 

Limerick City and County has 18 blackspots    Co Tipperary has 2   Waterford City and County has 9

 

But Co Tipperary at 14.6%   has a higher unemployment rate than Limerick City and County at 14.4%-See Below

 

County Tipperary       2 blackspots       Av in blackspots  30.8%         County Av Rate   14.6%

Co Tipp is 12th  highest unemployment rate of the administrative counties

79 Unemployment Blackspots  nationally

Threshold  for Blackspot Designation 27% Unemployment

No 16 Tipperary East Urban    34.0%   – Part of Tipperary Town and Eastward

No 55 Carrick-on-Suir                  29.2%

 

Table 2.1 Number of unemployment blackspots by administrative county,2016

County               Number of unemployment blackspots                  Average unemployment %                       County unemployment rate %

Limerick City and County                18                                                                                      35.7                                                                          14.4                        14

Waterford City and County          9                                                                                            31.5                                                                           15.4                      8

Dublin City                                         7                                                                                                   30.4                                                                         12.9

Donegal                                                 6                                                                                                 30.0                                                                            18.0                     2

Cork City                                             5                                                                                                32.7                                                                              15.0                     11

Mayo                                                     5                                                                                                  29.0                                                                               14.3

South Dublin                                     4                                                                                                      29.4                                                                            13.3

Clare                                                     3                                                                                                         29.2                                                                           12.4

Longford                                              3                                                                                                           31.4                                                                           19.6                           1

Wexford                                                3                                                                                                                31.1                                                                      16.6                            5

Cavan                                                   2                                                                                                 35.1                                                                                         15.1                         9

Galway County                                2                                                                                                 32.7                                                                                                11.7

Tipperary                                           2                                                                                                          30.8                                                                                      14.6                 12

Fingal                                                 1                                                                                                         28.1                                                                                      10.3

Kildare                                              1                                                                                                            35.0                                                                                           11.4

Kilkenny                                        1                                                                                                               27.5                                                                                         12.7

Kerry                                               1                                                                                                            27.2                                                                                                   12.4

Louth                                                 1                                                                                                         28.0                                                                                                   16.7             4

Meath                                             1                                                                                                             29.7                                                                                           11.2

Monaghan                                  1                                                                                                              27.7                                                                                              13.0

Roscommon                                   1                                                                                                                27.1                                                                                          13.0

Westmeath                                  1                                                                                                                      33.4                                                                                        15.9                7

Wicklow                                           1                                                                                                                       27.2                                                                                        12.7

Total                         79                                                                    31.2                                                     12.9

 

 

Figure 2.5 Unemployment by administrative county, 2016 –

County                                           %

1   Longford                                  19.6

2   Donegal                                    18.0

3     Carlow

4  Louth                                    16.7

5    Wexford                            16.6

6  Offaly

7  Westmeath                                           15.9

8     Waterford City and County          15.4

9        Laois

10     Cavan                                              15.1

11       Cork City                                      15.0

12         Tipperary                                       14.6

13          Leitrim

14        Limerick City and County          14.4

Mayo

Sligo

South Dublin                                                      13.3

Monaghan

Roscommon

Galway City

21 Dublin City                                                                    12.9

Kilkenny

Wicklow

Kerry

Clare

Galway County

Kildare                                                                 11.4

Meath                                                              11.2

Fingal                                                          10.3

Cork County

Dún Laoghaire-Rathdown                    7.4%

————————————————————–

SEAMUS HEALY TD  DEMANDS RETENTION AND RESTORATION OF BUS AND RAIL SERVICES IN  COUNTY TIPPERARY IN DÁIL QUESTIONS TO TAOISEACH

ROADS AND BY-PASSES MUST BE UPGRADED

BUT TAOISEACH TREATS GENUINE CONCERNS AS A JOKE 

All citizens have a right to a satisfactory and good-quality public transport service. It is the duty of the State to ensure that such a service provided. It cannot and must not be left to market forces. Members of the public in my Tipperary constituency and in rural areas generally are entitled to the same standard of public transport as the constituents of the Minister, Deputy Ross, here in Dublin. Yesterday, Bus Éireann proposed the closure of the Clonmel to Dublin bus service among others. This is absolutely unacceptable and will not be tolerated. Of course, it comes on the back of the closure of the Carrick-on-Suir to Dublin bus service in 2015. It comes on the back of the proposed closure of the Limerick to Waterford rail service and the Limerick to Ballybrophy rail service. The Limerick to Waterford rail line servicing Carrick-on-Suir, Clonmel, Cahir and Tipperary town is being undermined on a daily basis by management regularly and frequently cancelling trains on that line. In addition, the main social and economic corridor across the south of the county, the N24, has been left out of the road capital programme, which is particularly damaging to the Tipperary town and Carrick-on-Suir. Of course, the failure to build the Thurles bypass, which has been overlooked for years, resulting in chaos in the square, turning it into a car park.

County Tipperary is not getting a fair crack of the whip. A Fine Gael led Government already abolished Clonmel Borough Council and the town councils in Carrick-on-Suir, Cashel, Tipperary town, Thurles, Templemore and Nenagh. A Fine Gael led Government with the help of the Labour Party also closed the St. Michael’s 50 bed psychiatric unit at South Tipperary General Hospital.

Now north Tipperary patients must travel to Ennis and south Tipperary patients must travel to Kilkenny to avail of a service that is inadequate and substandard. The abandonment of County Tipperary must stop. I am asking the Taoiseach if he will give an assurance to stop any threat to the Clonmel to Dublin bus service. Will he give an assurance to re-establish the Carrick-on-Suir to Dublin bus service? After 20 years of waiting, will the Taoiseach give the go-ahead for the N24 upgrading, including the bypass of Tipperary town, Clonmel and Carrick-on-Suir? Also after 20 years, will the Taoiseach give the go-ahead for the bypass of Thurles this afternoon?

TAOISEACH KENNY: I am not in a position to do that, as the Deputy well knows. I agree with him that transport for rural Ireland should not be left to market forces only and it is not. That is why the Minister, Deputy Ross, has pointed out, as I have on many occasions, that the National Transport Authority, NTA, is quite prepared to take up any slack for public transport connectivity between areas that are affected by the dispute between Bus Éireann and the unions. The matter the Deputy mentioned of Clonmel is one of three that have been referred to but there are no decisions taken about any of this because until the dispute is settled nothing is decided. The chief executive pointed out options, hard though they are, and that is why it is important that people go back into the Workplace Relations Commission, WRC, and use that experience, capacity and facility to bring about a solution and a conclusion to this.

The Deputy asked an omnibus question about the Thurles bypass, the N24 and the south Tipperary hospital and everything else in between and he expects me to answer in the positive here today for him.

SEAMUS HEALY TD:It has been 20 years. 

TAOISEACH KENNY For the sake of his constituents, the Deputy will be aware there is a capital review programme about to be carried out on major infrastructure during the course of the year which should be completed by mid-year. The Minister for Public Expenditure and Reform will look carefully at the ongoing public consultation in that regard at the moment. As I said to Deputy Martin, the European Investment Bank has opened its office here which will allow for major pieces of infrastructure where an income stream might come from them in order for those pieces of infrastructure to be dealt with separately from central Exchequer. I cannot speak for the outcome of the capital review but it is under way.

Last week, Deputy Lowry raised the question of the South Tipperary General Hospital including Our Lady’s in Cashel. Those particular problems have been mentioned by the Minister, Deputy Harris. He has been there and wants to address the capacity issues as well as ensuring Our Lady’s in Cashel is utilised. I understand a mini-tender will be done in the coming weeks to request proposals for temporary accommodation in Tipperary. The HSE has already been asked to make maximum use of the Cashel campus and is considering every option to support south Tipperary with community and primary care services. The Deputy does not have a definitive answer here but he has an opportunity to work, in terms of the capital review, on the issues and to advise people to go back into the WRC to see whether we can settle this dispute between Bus Éireann and the unions.

The Deputy mentioned Ballybrophy and a few other things about Iarnród Éireann. He obviously wants the entire budget to be shifted down to Tipperary. 

SEAMUS HEALY TD:It takes a lot of money, as the Taoiseach well knows. 

TAOISEACH KENNY:It will not happen today but the Deputy has to work on his proposals to advance it piece by piece. 

SEAMUS HEALY TD: It sounds very much like “live horse and you’ll get grass”. We have been waiting for 20 years for both the N24 upgrade and the Thurles bypass. The Taoiseach’s Government and the previous Government starved public transport and road budgets. The road budgets fell between 2007 and 2015 by €1.722 billion. The State subvention to CIE was slashed by €132 million, from €321 million in 2008 to €189 million in 2015. The State subvention to Bus Éireann is down €16.3 million from €49.4 million to €33.1 million. The free travel contribution from the Department of Social Protection is completely inadequate. It has been capped for years despite increased numbers and the fact that 30% of Bus Éireann’s passengers are availing of free travel.

In June 2016, the Taoiseach wrote to the President of the European Commission, Jean-Claude Juncker, seeking permission to borrow money for infrastructural works. He said at the time that investment in infrastructure in Ireland was “at its lowest level for many years, and also represents the lowest level of any member state at present”. He got no reply, or none that we heard of, but Italy recently told the President Juncker it will borrow money with or without his permission. I ask the Taoiseach to do likewise. Will he reassert Irish sovereignty and put the right of the Irish people to proper transport infrastructure, and other capital investment such as housing, before the EU and EU diktats?

TAOISEACH KENNY :I had a meeting this morning with Commissioner Timmermans about a range of issues that are about to come up and one of those is the investment capacity for countries throughout Europe to invest in major pieces of infrastructure to improve facilities, provide employment and boost output and growth. I wrote to President Juncker because there was a blockage in the system in terms of the way EUROSTAT was treating the development of and proposals for infrastructure and the European Commission, and we sorted that out. Clearly, there has been a big improvement in the capacity of countries to borrow for infrastructural projects. As I said, the European Investment Bank has opened an office in Dublin which is now open for proposals from local authorities, Government agencies and so on. I hope there will be a big improvement in that in the time ahead.

It is not true to say that the State has neglected everything here. There are some major roads projects going on around the country including the Gort-Tuam project involving €600 million and others that are currently in train.

SEAMUS HEALY TD:They are not happening down in Tipperary. We have wanted them for 20 years.

TAOISEACH KENNY:The Deputy mentioned the N24 and the Thurles bypass. They are not alone in their difficulties. A man in Cork said to me at the Brexit meeting last week that he found me guilty of clogging up the roads with people going to work.

ADEPUTY: Is this a real man?

DEPUTY MICHEAL MARTIN(FF) : Did the Taoiseach see the boys of Fairhill?

————–

GOVERNMENT OWNED BANKS AND OTHER LENDERS SEEK TO EVICT  100 TIPPERARY FAMILIES BEFORE CHRISTMAS

More than 2,000 HOME REPOSSESSION Cases listed in the courts before Christmas-placing stress on families before the festive season

“In Meath, 150 cases are being heard on average each month, with 100 in Tipperary, 46 in Kilkenny, 88 in Mayo, and 83 in Kerry. Central Bank figures have revealed the number of repossessions of a “primary dwelling home” has dramatically increased in the past four years.”

Significant “escalation” in enforcement orders since the middle of the summer

Mark O’Regan  Sunday IndependentPUBLISHED20/11/2016  

The rise of family home repossession court cases is set to continue in the run-up to Christmas, with figures currently at 2,600 a month. 

There are 650 family court appearances a week, and experts have predicted there will be this many into next year.

It came amid claims of a significant “escalation” in enforcement orders since the middle of the summer.

The Sunday Independent has learned more than 2,000 cases will come before the courts in the next five weeks – placing stress on families before the festive season.

New Beginning – a group of lawyers providing representation for those facing repossession – said 100 cases on average are being heard a month in Limerick, with the figure for Cork running at 200.

In Meath, 150 cases are being heard on average each month, with 100 in Tipperary, 46 in Kilkenny, 88 in Mayo, and 83 in Kerry. Central Bank figures have revealed the number of repossessions of a “primary dwelling home” has dramatically increased in the past four years.

In 2015, 726 homes were repossessed. This compared with 315 dwellings seized by banks and financial institutions in 2014, and 251 in 2013.

In the first six months of this year, 240 homes were retaken by financial institutions.

Founder of New Beginning Ross Maguire said there had been a marked escalation in enforcement orders in recent months. He added: “There is a cohort of people in the country who, no matter what they do, cannot afford their mortgage, and are facing inevitable repossession.”

David Hall, director of the Irish Mortgage Holders Organisation, said the “system is failing” families grappling with mortgage debt. He called on Housing Minister Simon Coveney to declare a national emergency on the issue.

He said: “There are 34,000 cases in arrears of more than two years and 59,000 between one and two years.”

 

—————————————-

Press Statement  Seamus Healy   TD 

Sack Noonan says Healy

Deputy Seamus Healy has called on Taoiseach Enda Kenny T.D. to sack Minister for Finance Michael Noonan.

Minister Noonan directed Nama to accelerate sales of assets in a weak market, costing the state and the Irish people billions. Project Eagle was but one example.

Furthermore he refused to stop the sale of Project Eagle when he and Nama became aware of revelations that a former Nama advisor stood to be paid 5million sterling from a prospective purchaser.

The Minister had already given away billions in Bank of Ireland shares to vulture capitalists.

US vulture capitalist, Wilbur Ross, celebrated huge windfall gains in Bank of Ireland shares on Bloomberg T.V.

The Taoiseach must now dismiss the Minister and the Independent Alliance must insist on this.

The Minister must also appear before the Public Accounts Committee.

Frank Daly, NAMA, CEO, has stated that the agency was instructed by Noonan to accelerate asset sales.

The sales of assets in Northern Ireland under Project Eagle took place in that context. Already Finance Minister Michael Noonan has been criticized by a Stormont parliamentary inquiry for failing to halt the controversial €1.32bn sale of Nama’s Northern Ireland loan portfolio.

All asset sales by NAMA must now be suspended.

The Government and Fianna Fáil are also attempting to confine the statutory inquiry to the activities of NAMA in Northern Ireland. This is despite the fact that a former NAMA official, who is now out on bail in NI, who was named in the BBC ‘Spotlight’ probe, was the former head of Nama’s Asset Management in Dublin Headquarters.  The BBC now says there are further revelations to come-“this is the tip of the Ice-berg”- BBC

NAMA paid banks 31.8 billion for assets of book value 77 billion in 2009.  If NAMA had retained the assets until now, the assets would have appreciated by at least 20 billion. Instead the government is now boasting that NAMA will make just 2 billion in “profit” . This takes no account of the 64 billion given to the banks to rescue them.

I call on FG and all deputies supporting the Government, including the Independent Alliance, to insist on the sacking of Noonan as Minister and that he be instructed to appear before the Public Accounts Committee to explain the loss of billions to the Irish people during his term of office

Seamus Healy TD

20/09/2016

087 2802199

——————————————————-

“The (Tipperary)constituency’s other Independent TD, Seamus Healy, yesterday warned of “people power” returning to the streets of Clonmel if extra beds aren’t delivered at South Tipperary General Hospital, in reference to a protest march in 2010 over the future of the hospital.”-Irish Examiner 14/09/2016

 No HSE funds for ‘patient hotel’ as consultant warns of ‘disaster’ this winter due to overcrowding

 Irish Examiner Wednesday, September 14, 2016

Conor Kane 

A senior consultant at one of the country’s most regularly overcrowded hospitals has warned of “disaster” at the facility this winter after the HSE failed to allocate any of its 2016 budget for a hoped-for “patient hotel” in its winter initiative.

The winter plan published last week said that two options are being “considered” by the HSE to alleviate over-crowding at South Tipperary General Hospital: A “modular build extension” to the existing hospital and fitting out space in an area currently under construction.

“The HSE’s examination of patient hotel-type service will proceed in parallel,” the initiative states.

However, no money has been allocated for the proposal in this year’s funding, with €700,000 allocated for 2017.

Senior consultant at STGH Dr Paud O’Regan said he and the hospital were “bitterly disappointed” with the plan.

There were hopes that a 40-bed patient hotel could be in place by late October, but it is now widely accepted it will not happen this year and the HSE has yet to deal with “cost-benefit analysis, procurement issues, and planning/construction issues,” as it says itself in the winter initiative.

“We were confident that it would be announced in the winter initiative and had been assured by the minister of that,” said Dr O’Regan.

The hospital “hasn’t lost hope” that the patient hotel will happen, he said, but it will not be in time for this winter.

“We feel that the hospital will not be able to cope with the winter influx of patients, in view of the fact that we have run at 150% medical bed occupancy during the summer and, when the winter surge comes, we will not be able to cope.”

He blamed the HSE for not making a decision on the proposal. “Everybody agrees it’s needed but it’s the HSE that is holding it up. New ideas to them are like holy water to a vampire.” The consultant added: “We’re facing into a disaster.”

Independent TD Mattie McGrath yesterday accused fellow Independent TD for Tipperary Michael Lowry of “irresponsibly raising expectations” regarding the assignment of a patient hotel to Clonmel, following reports in August of a “deal” to deliver the project at STGH.

Mr Lowry, in a statement this week, said he spoke to Health Minister Simon Harris last Friday about the winter initiative.

“The minister reminded me that this is the first time that a HSE officialised document has formally referenced and included a patient hotel for Clonmel,” he said.

“He stated the initiative was still in the progression stage and the Health Service Executive were committed to progressing the unit in parallel with the upcoming ‘winter initiative’. It was originally intended to fast track this project but it is now accepted that because of the nature and scale of this modular unit planning will have to be sought and the unit subject to national procurement policy.

“The Minister has informed me that he was concerned in that context, that we are going to miss the ‘winter bulge’ activity in the hospital.”

The constituency’s other Independent TD, Seamus Healy, yesterday warned of “people power” returning to the streets of Clonmel if extra beds aren’t delivered at STGH, in reference to a protest march in 2010 over the future of the hospital.

 

————–

Seamus Healy TD was the only Tipperary Deputy To Vote Against The Government Motion To Appeal the Award of 13 billion Plus Interest to Ireland in Corporation Tax Owed by Apple at the Special Sitting of Dáil Eireann

For The Government  Motion: Cahill, Jackie (FF) , Kelly, Alan (Labour), Lowry, Michael (Independent)

Against The Government Motion: Healy, Seamus TD

Did not Vote;  McGrath, Mattie TD (Independent)-Deputy McGrath spoke in the Debate

Seamus Healy: I am proud to have voted against the return of in excess of 13 billion Euro to Apple. I want the money to be used to address the severe crises in housing,health, education and other public services for the needy.

Sweetheart deals and allowing corporate entities to avoid paying their fair share of tax have serious consequences for ordinary people.It is not a victimless crime. We have, for instance, a serious housing emergency, with more than 100,000 families on housing waiting lists, and a growing homelessness problem, with 2,000 children living in emergency accommodation. Families continue to be evicted from their homes by banks owned by the State. Hundreds of thousands of people are on hospital waiting lists and chaos prevails in hospital emergency departments. Home help services, home care packages and education are being cut and the list goes on. Low and middle income families are also being fleeced by the universal social charge, house tax, inheritance tax, VAT, student fees and the water tax.

Fine Gael, the “Endapendents”, Fianna Fáil and the Labour Party are betraying the Irish people by refusing to accept €13 billion with interest from the €228 billion which Apple has resting in subsidiaries with no tax residence anywhere in the world. The same politicians meekly gave €64 billion of citizens’ money to large international investors who gambled on Irish bank bonds and imposed austerity on our people They now want to give back the guts of €19 billion to one of the largest companies in the world, thus leaving our public services in deep crisis.

 

Full Actual Dáil Speech of Deputy Healy

 

Deputy Seamus Healy (Tipperary) I will vote against the Government’s proposals on this issue. Mr. Martin Shanahan, the chief executive officer of IDA Ireland, stated in a recent radio interview that the ruling “does not call into question Ireland’s tax regime and does not call into question Ireland’s 12.5% tax rate”. The European Commissioner, Mr. Phil Hogan, subsequently agreed with Mr. Shanahan. Both Mr. Hogan and Mr. Shanahan are correct that the Commission’s ruling does not affect Ireland’s corporation tax rate or sole competency to set that rate. Why then is the Government, by which I mean the Fine Gael Party, the Independents supporting Enda or “Endapendents”, Fianna Fáil and the Labour Party, stressing its militant opposition to any change in the 12.5% corporate tax rate? This fake militancy is in total contrast to the grovelling support shown by these parties for the bailout and fiscal treaty, which fly in the face of the 1916 Proclamation and Irish sovereignty.

Sweetheart deals and allowing corporate entities to avoid paying their fair share of tax have serious consequences for ordinary people. We have, for instance, a serious housing emergency, with more than 100,000 families on housing waiting lists, and a growing homelessness problem, with 2,000 children living in emergency accommodation. Families continue to be evicted from their homes by banks owned by the State. Hundreds of thousands of people are on hospital waiting lists and chaos prevails in hospital emergency departments. Home help services, home care packages and education are being cut and the list goes on. Low and middle income families are also being fleeced by the universal social charge, house tax, inheritance tax, VAT, student fees and the water tax.

Fine Gael, the “Endapendents”, Fianna Fáil and the Labour Party are betraying the Irish people by refusing to accept €13 billion with interest from the €228 billion which Apple has resting in subsidiaries with no tax residence. The same politicians meekly gave €64 billion of citizens’ money to large international investors who gambled on Irish bank bonds. They now want to give back the guts of €19 billion to one of the largest companies in the world.

We heard a great deal in this debate about the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, OECD, and base erosion and profit shifting, BEPS, a concept to which the Minister referred and which is referred to in many, if not all, of the amendments to the motion. BEPS, it seems, will be our saviour. Nothing could be further from the truth, however, because if the current proposals are implemented, Ireland’s position will worsen as corporations will pay each country tax on the profits they make from sales of their products in that country. As sales in Ireland account for only a tiny fraction of worldwide sales, corporation tax revenue will come under serious threat from these proposals. While the 12.5% rate will not change, it will apply to a much smaller share of profits, which will have serious implications for employment here. Many countries, including the United Kingdom, have announced reductions in their corporation tax rates in a race to the bottom. For this reason, the fake militancy of supporters of this motion is a smokescreen to cover up the effects of their current policies and the economic development policies they pursued over decades, including, above all, the ceding of all effective economic sovereignty to the European Union and multinational companies.

Ireland’s ability to respond to this serious threat has been weakened by the privatisation of various companies, including Eircom and Aer Lingus. The Finnish Government, through a nationalised wood company, created thousands of jobs in an indigenous company, Nokia. We must do likewise by creating tens of thousands of jobs in indigenous industries in the high-tech, energy and agricultural sectors, as well as in public works programmes. Above all, we must recover our sovereignty to allow us to cope with future developments. Italy, France and Spain flout the fiscal treaty when it suits them and we must do likewise.

 

Voting On Government Motion

Full Dáil Record of Debate

http://oireachtasdebates.oireachtas.ie/debates%20authoring/debateswebpack.nsf/takes/dail2016090700079?opendocument

Question put: “That the motion be agreed to.”

The Dáil divided: Tá, 93; Níl, 36.

Níl
      Aylward, Bobby.       Adams, Gerry.
      Bailey, Maria.       Barry, Mick.
      Barrett, Seán.       Boyd Barrett, Richard.
      Brassil, John.       Brady, John.
      Breathnach, Declan.       Broughan, Thomas P.
      Breen, Pat.       Buckley, Pat.
      Brophy, Colm.       Connolly, Catherine.
      Browne, James.       Coppinger, Ruth.
      Bruton, Richard.       Crowe, Seán.
      Burke, Peter.       Cullinane, David.
      Burton, Joan.       Daly, Clare.
      Butler, Mary.       Doherty, Pearse.
      Byrne, Catherine.       Ellis, Dessie.
      Cahill, Jackie.       Fitzmaurice, Michael.
      Calleary, Dara.       Healy, Seamus.
      Canney, Seán.       Kenny, Gino.
      Carey, Joe.       Kenny, Martin.
      Casey, Pat.       Martin, Catherine.
      Cassells, Shane.       Mitchell, Denise.
      Chambers, Jack.       Munster, Imelda.
      Collins, Michael.       Murphy, Catherine.
      Collins, Niall.       Murphy, Paul.
      Corcoran Kennedy, Marcella.       Nolan, Carol.
      Coveney, Simon.       Ó Broin, Eoin.
      Cowen, Barry.       Ó Caoláin, Caoimhghín.
      Curran, John.       Ó Snodaigh, Aengus.
      Daly, Jim.       O’Brien, Jonathan.
      D’Arcy, Michael.       O’Reilly, Louise.
      Doherty, Regina.       O’Sullivan, Maureen.
      Donohoe, Paschal.       Pringle, Thomas.
      Dooley, Timmy.       Ryan, Eamon.
      Durkan, Bernard J.       Shortall, Róisín.
      English, Damien.       Smith, Bríd.
      Farrell, Alan.       Stanley, Brian.
      Fitzgerald, Frances.       Tóibín, Peadar.
      Flanagan, Charles.       Wallace, Mick.
      Grealish, Noel.
      Griffin, Brendan.
      Halligan, John.
      Harris, Simon.
      Haughey, Seán.
      Healy-Rae, Danny.
      Healy-Rae, Michael.
      Heydon, Martin.
      Howlin, Brendan.
      Humphreys, Heather.
      Kehoe, Paul.
      Kelleher, Billy.
      Kelly, Alan.
      Kenny, Enda.
      Kyne, Seán.
      Lahart, John.
      Lawless, James.
      Lowry, Michael.
      MacSharry, Marc.
      Madigan, Josepha.
      Martin, Micheál.
      McEntee, Helen.
      McGrath, Finian.
      McGrath, Michael.
      McHugh, Joe.
      McLoughlin, Tony.
      Mitchell O’Connor, Mary.
      Moran, Kevin Boxer.
      Moynihan, Aindrias.
      Moynihan, Michael.
      Murphy O’Mahony, Margaret.
      Murphy, Eoghan.
      Naughten, Denis.
      Naughton, Hildegarde.
      Neville, Tom.
      Noonan, Michael.
      Ó Cuív, Éamon.
      O’Brien, Darragh.
      O’Callaghan, Jim.
      O’Connell, Kate.
      O’Dea, Willie.
      O’Keeffe, Kevin.
      O’Rourke, Frank.
      Penrose, Willie.
      Phelan, John Paul.
      Rabbitte, Anne.
      Ring, Michael.
      Ross, Shane.
      Ryan, Brendan.
      Scanlon, Eamon.
      Sherlock, Sean.
      Smith, Brendan.
      Smyth, Niamh.
      Stanton, David.
      Troy, Robert.
      Varadkar, Leo.
      Zappone, Katherine.

 

Tellers: Tá, Deputies Jim Daly and Regina Doherty; Níl, Deputies Pearse Doherty and Aengus Ó Snodaigh.

Question declared carried.

The Dáil adjourned at 10.05 p.m. until 2 p.m. on Tuesday, 27 September 2016.

 

 

 104 Tipperary Families Before Eviction Courts in July-Clonmel 46, Nenagh 58

Seamus Healy TD has repeatedly called for a halt to evictions in the Dáil

But despite a recommendation of Oireachtas Committee on Housing and Homelessness, the Government Action Plan fails to recommend even a temporary halt to eviction proceedings in court until new debt resolution procedures are in place.

As a result 104 Tipperary families, and over 3000 nationally, are being put through the extreme distress of facing eviction in the courts including a number of successive court appearances. a large number of these families include young children

The improved debt resolution procedures recommended by the Oireachtas sub-committee have also been WATERED DOWN in the government plan.

STOP EVICTION PROCEEDINGS NOW!

3,041 families up for eviction in court in this month of July-The Hub Ireland

A grand total of 3,041 families up for eviction in court this month of July. Ignoring the mortgage arrears crisis is fueling homelessness at a horrifying scale. I am tired contacting all the people who are paid to care. What else can we do?—Martina Doyle, The Hub-Ireland

Limerick 146 and 5.

Dundalk 55 and 52.

Tullamore 19 and 71.

Waterford 34 and 18 and 20 and 70 .

Dublin 57 and 4 and 4 and 55 and 1 and 50 and 59 and 5 and 10 and 2 and 5 and 54 and 8 and 57 and 62 and 2.

Cork 72 and 98 and 32 and 87 and 20 and 5 and 59.

Monaghan 102.

Trim 75 and 80 and 76.

Carrick on Shannon 35.

Bray 125.

Castlebar 78.

Portlaoise 40 and 32.

Naas 9 and 71 and 101 and 16.

Letterkenny 89.

Cavan 39 and 100.

Wexford 43 and 60.

Kilkenny 33 and 40.

Sligo 30.

Roscommon 75.

Ennis 84.

Clonmel 46.

Nenagh 58.

Carlow 41.

Tralee 64.

A grand total of 3,041 families up for eviction, one month = July.

———————————-

HANDS OFF SOUTH TIPPERARY GENERAL HOSPITAL!

Statement by Seamus Healy  TD   July 12,2016

Deputy Seamus Healy, Chair of the Save Our Acute Hospital Services Committee, has warned the Health Service Executive and the Minister for Health to keep their hands off the services at South Tipperary General Hospital.

Deputy Healy was responding to media reports suggesting that the emergency department at the Hospital was being earmarked for closure.

As in the past, “people power” will defeat any attempt to downgrade services at South Tipperary General Hospital.

Saturday 27 th March, 2010 was a red letter day for hospital services in South Tipperary. That was the day the people of South Tipperary stood, 15,000 strong, on the streets of Clonmel and defeated the last attempt to downgrade and transfer our hospital services.

I have no doubt the people of Tipperary will do the same again if needed.

The closure of the emergency department at South Tipperary General Hospital would be dangerous and irresponsible and would indeed put lives at risk with seriously ill patients bypassing the hospital going to already overcrowded services at Cork and Waterford.

Far from downgrading and closure, South Tipperary General Hospital needs to be supported with additional resources, funding and staff. The hospital is “bursting at its seams” working at 120% capacity every hour of every day.

The newly appointed Minister for Health, Mr. Simon Harris T.D., at my request, will be visiting the hospital shortly to see both the excellent work being done at the hospital and the difficulties being experienced by patients and staff due to under resourcing and shortage of beds.

Indeed we are currently in discussion with the Minister with a view to getting approval for a quick build 40 bed capacity modular/hotel type unit for the hospital for the coming winter.

I will be raising the issue of the future of the emergency department at South Tipperary General Hospital in the Dáil with the Minister this week.

Seamus Healy TD

12/07/2016

087 2802199


Irish Nurses and Midwives Organisation Expresses Concern

Full Statement https://www.inmo.ie/Home/Index/217/12741

“We now call on the government to make a clear statement that the existing Emergency Departments are not threatened by this report and that there will be no repeat of the disastrous consequences already evident in Limerick, Galway, Drogheda, South Dublin and South Tipperary” concluded David Hughes, Deputy General Secretary.”

—-   —-      —-        —–

EMERGENCY ACTION NEEDED TO RESCUE HOMELESS CHILDREN AND PREVENT UNNECESSARY DEATHS DUE TO TROLLEY CHAOS IN HOSPITALS –Deputy Healy

Nomination of Candidate for Taoiseach –Seamus Healy TD

March 10, 2016

This New Dáil must see a fundamental departure from the failed policies of the last two Dails. The last two governments had the choice to protect the most vulnerable in our society. But Instead they chose to protect the super-rich, the bankers and the bond-holders.

There are now at least 1600 children in emergency hotel accommodation. The Institute of Emergency Medicine says that between 300 and 350 unnecessary deaths are taking place each year due to trolley chaos in our hospitals, which is worse than the carnage on our roads. For example, yesterday, in South Tipperary Genera Hospitall there were 32 people on trolleys, University Hospital Limerick which serves North Tipperary had 50 on trolleys.

The people have rejected the approach of the Fine Gael-Labour Government which caused this human emergency. The people also heavily rejected the approach of the Fianna Fáil-Green Government in 2011.

This new Dail must take a radically different course to the last two Dails. It must take a course that prioritises the human need for adequate medical treatment including death prevention and care for “all the children of the nation” (1916 proclamation) above all else THERE is no higher priority.

Accordingly, I am asking the new Dail to enact the following emergency measure as its first legislative act: “That Dail Eireann set aside and cancel all reductions in Universal Social Charge and/or income taxation granted in Budget 2016 to the 5% of income recipients with the highest incomes and instructs the Government to bring forward amending legislation to enact this measure immediately.”

I have ,to-day, put down a private members motion to this effect.

Approximately 125 million Euro will be saved by this measure. The money should be immediately applied to rescue the homeless children and to prevent unnecessary deaths due to hospital chaos. This is the least we might do on the 100 th anniversary of 1916.

While this measure will not be enough to remedy problems of homelessness and inadequate human services into the future, it will ameliorate the position in the short term, while fundamental policy changes are formulated and enacted by the new Dáil.

VERY IMPORTANTLY, IT WOULD GIVE A SIGNAL THAT FUNDAMENTAL CHOICES WHICH PRIORITISE THE WELL-BEING OF HUMAN BEINGS ABOVE ALL ELSE WILL BE TAKEN BY THIS DAIL.

Broken Promises Erode Democracy and Flout the Will of the People

Citizens must come centre stage with an ongoing input into the democratic process including the recall of deputies and the re-introduction into the constitution of the peoples entitlement to instigate referenda and legislation.

Water Charges

As a founder member of Right2Water , It goes without saying that I will be supporting the abolition of Water Charges. Water charges and LPT, the family home tax, are regressive measures designed to load the burden of the crash on those low and middle incomes who had no hand act or part in creating it. They are designed to protect the super-rich from fair taxation.

The State Debt

A situation in which the exchequer is paying over 7 billion per year in interest at the expense of underfunded public services must not continue.

The portion of the debt which arises from the compensation of large investors for their failed investments in private banks must be mutualised. Negotiations must be re-opened on this issue with the EU authorities immediately.

Election of Taoiseach

I contested the election as part of the Right2Water, Right2Change Alliance. I will therefore be voting for the AAA-PBP candidate, Richard Boyd-Barret and the Sinn Fein Candidate, Gerry ADAMS. I will be voting against the Fianna Fáil and Fine Gael candidates in accordance with my pre-election statements.

 

 

 

 

 

Address of Seamus Healy TD to New Dáil
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Seamus Healy TD   WUA,  Right2Change relegates Labour Minister  and Deputy Leader Alan Kelly into (last) 5th place by 1124 votes.

Solid first count vote for Seamus Healy  plus strong transfer from Right2Change allies Sinn Féin ensured the election of Seamus Healy 

Kelly took the last seat without reaching the quota at the expense of Fine Gael Minister Tom Hayes. This was despite the complete collapse of the Labour vote in South Tipperary.

Tom Hayes was 1 to 9 to retain his seat in the betting!!!

Shocks

The biggest shock was the failure of Fine Gael to get any seat in County Tipperary!

This has never happened before in Irish History!

It could be argued that Michael Lowry and Alan Kelly  are surrogate FG deputies.

The stronger transfer from outgoing Fine Gael TD Noel Coonan to Alan Kelly (Labour) at the expense of running mate Minister Tom Hayes supports this thesis.

Nevertheless, The failure of any TD representing Fine Gael to be elected is seismic and historic.

The failure of Michael Lowry to achieve much more than a quota on first count was in total contrast to predictions. This was despite the substantial number of first preference  votes he took from Tom Hayes in west Tipperary.

The  strength of the performance of independent Mattie McGrath was also unexpected.

An element of this was a “pro-life” campaign by Mattie which was particularly effective in West Tipperary at the expense of defeated Minister Tom Hayes (FG). This campaign was largely “under the radar”but no less effective for that.

Mattie was protected by the media throughout the campaign from exposure of his support as a then  Fianna Fáil TD for the austerity policies  of the Cowan-Lenihan government(2007-2011) including the halting of recruitment to the gardaí, cuts in the Minimum Wage, social welfare benefits, child benefit, health services, education etc. This allowed Mattie to do his usual “run with the hare and hunt with the hounds” routine.

The strength of the transfer between Fianna Fáil candidates was also surprising. The very limited nature of the leakage of Fianna Fail votes to FG and Labour , even when the candidates  were located together, was evident.There may be some surprise that Jackie Cahill succeeded rather than Michael Smith  in achieving the 1 seat for Fianna Fáil.

There is now only one TD north of Thurles

Seamus Healy lost some votes to Sinn Féin on first count in South Tipp but they returned on the elimination of Seamus Morris (Sinn Féin) who had, by then, received over 6000 votes. The solid first round performance which was the bedrock of the Healy victory, was based on his customary huge support in working class communities in South Tipperary.

Work by Water Charge Campaigners and by Seamus Healy himself in North Tipperary ensured that between first and later preferences, ensured that when he was declared elected to the  4th seat, he had received about 1,500 votes from north Tipperary.

Thanks to All!!

—————————————————————————————————————————–

Mattie McGrath TD Supports Domestic Water Charges

Mattie on TippFM  Thursday, November 6,2014

Click Here http://tippfm.podomatic.com/entry/2014-11-06T03_30_45-08_00

Mattie McGrath tells Local Radio that he supports Water Charges, supports Metering and will Pay the Water ChargesStatement by Seamus Healy TD   Workersand Unemployed Action  Yet again Deputy McGrath is “running with the hare and hunting with the hounds” He has now made clear in an interview on Tipp FM that he supports water charges, supports metering and will pay the water charges himself. Deputy McGrath has been pretending to oppose water charges and trying to use the water charges protests as a bandwagon for himself. But he let the cat out of the bag on Thursday last, 6 November, when he told Tipp Today “I am in favour of a charge for water…..” and again “I am in favour of metering…” Earlier in the interview he describes water as a “commodity” and confirmed that he will pay the water charges. Clearly Deputy McGrath is now supporting this government’s attempts to bring in the hated water charges, another austerity tax on hard pressed families. Deputy McGrath knows well that as soon as charges are in place for domestic water, it will become a commodity under European Law and all restrictions on state aid will then apply. This means that however low the initial charge, households will eventually pay the full price for production and delivery of water. This will be in addition to the money we are already paying through general taxation for water – paying a second time. Deputy McGrath and the Labour Party are now, also, using the proposal for a referendum on privatisation as a smokescreen for the introduction of water charges. The People of Tipperary will ignore the smokescreens and will keep up the pressure for the abolition of these hated water charges. (Extracts from the Tipp FM interview and a link to the actual interview are attached below) Seamus Healy T.D. 087 2802199 14 minutes in to Tipptoday hour 2, Thursday, November 6,2014 http://tippfm.podomatic.com/entry/2014-11-06T03_30_45-08_00 Extracts From Interview with Séamus Martin on Tipptoday Seamus Martin: Are You Going to Pay the Water Charges? Mattie McGrath TD: Seamus, if I get a bill and I am an elected representative to Dáil Éireann I have to  pay, I can’t break the law. Seamus Martin: There are other elected TDs, notably Seamus Healy TD, the Sinn Féin TDs and the socialist TDs who say they will break the law and they won’t pay it Mattie McGrath: Yes that’s their choice and their right to do—but I believe and always have believed that water is a valuable commodity——- Seamus Martin; When it comes to paying for all this, water charges, are you in favour of water being paid for directly or through indirect taxation? Mattie McGrath: It has to be paid for , one way or the other, it has to be paid for Seamus Martin: Which one would you favour Mattie McGrath: I am in favour of metering because I am in favour of conservation—  —— Seamus Martin: So you are in favour of the charge? Mattie McGrath: I am in favour of A charge for water and I have to be honest there because water is a costly commodity to produce

Mattie McGrath TD Offers to Support a Fine Gael Government in the next Dail.

Michael Noonan, chief architect of the cuts has approached him!

Mattie is therefore prepared to support the following policies  to which Fine Gael are committed to implement in the next government:

  • Water Charges to be Continued
  • Family Home Tax to be Continued
  • Exorbitant Interest Rates On Mortgage Holders-Twice the European Average, to be Continued
  • Eviction of Tipperary families from their homes by government owned banks to be Continued (Michael Noonan has recently refused the request of Seamus Healy TD, in a parliamentary question in the Dáil, to stop AIB, Permanent TSB,and ESB, in which the Minister holds the huge majority of the shares, seeking the eviction of Tipperary families through the courts)

 

56 Tipperary Families EVICTED in 2015, Another 97 UNDER THREAT

Government Evicts Families—-Statement:Seamus Healy TD

This government will continue to evict families from their homes

Noonan Refuses To Halt Evictions by AIB, PTSB, EBS in Dáil.

In the Dáil last Thursday  I appealed to Minister Michael Noonan to order the banks he owns to withdraw repossession proceedings in light of the extreme housing emergency which exists.

The Minister refused.  This means that the government has given the green light to the banks they own, to continue to evict families.

Court Orders for repossession of 47 primary residences were granted at Clonmel and Nenagh Circuit Courts in the first 3 quarters of 2015. A further 8 buy-to-lets which also house families were also repossessed. Banks are now seeking a further 97 repossession orders for dwellings in Tipp, of which 32 are being sought by AIB, EBS and Permanent TSB which are owned by the Government through Michael Noonan (FG) Minister for Finance

Minister Noonan claimed that the issue was being reasonably handled by the banks. Totally misrepresenting the situation, Mr Noonan quoted the 208 orders for repossessions for the whole country for Quarter 3,2015 as representative of the scale of the problem. COURTS ONLY SIT FOR 1 OF THE 3 MONTHS IN QUARTER 3!! The Court Service Figures for the whole country for Quarters 1 and 2 are 586 and 314 respectively.

The proposed Eviction of 97 Tipperary Families Must Be Stopped Now!

 

Senior Minister Alan Kelly (Lab) and Minister of State Hayes(FG) must now intervene at Cabinet to have a Housing Emergency Declared and all repossession applications withdrawn.

In particular they must force Minister Noonan to withdraw the repossession applications by the banks he owns.

 

This can be done by government decision and does not require legislation.

 

Seamus Healy T.D.                                                                                         18/01/2016

Tel 087 2802199

 

 

Statement by Seamus Healy TD    087-2802199   

HEALY ACCUSES GOVERNMENT OF WASHING IT’s HANDS OF THE JOB LOSSES AT Gleesons 

Government REFUSES TO Stop Closure 

KENNY Refuse to give HEALY a  Committmet to Provide IDA Advance Factory in Borrisoleigh

AT LEADERS QUESTIONS TO TAOISEACH in Dáil yesterday

 

 

Dail Record

Deputy Seamus Healy:   Yesterday, we learned of the closure of the C&C plant, formerly Gleeson’s, at Borrisoleigh, County Tipperary, with the loss of 140 jobs. I can only describe as shameful the fact that the workers and their families learned of this closure in the pages of The Irish Times and on local radio. It is a disgraceful way to treat workers who have been loyal to the company for many years, and up to 30 years in many cases. The closure is a hammer blow to the workers, their families and the town of Borrisoleigh, which has depended on the business for generations.

When C&C acquired Bulmers in Clonmel and Gleeson’s in Borrisoleigh, we were told there was a bright future for the company and that there were expansion plans. Of course, the opposite happened. The company shredded jobs at both locations and slashed wages and the terms and conditions of employment. We now hear about the closure of Gleeson’s, with 140 job losses. That closure is completely unnecessary and is being effected solely for the purpose of making more profit. In other words, it is a case of greed. The company C&C is very profitable. Its last set of accounts, for the half year to 30 September 2015, show a profit of €62.5 million. It is now very obvious to everybody that the company acquired Gleeson’s with the clear intention of closing it by stealth. There were 40 job losses and redundancies previously. The company has, and continues to have, support from Enterprise Ireland. The Government was aware of circumstances in C&C in Borrisoleigh. In November 2015, which is less than three months ago, the Dáil was told the Minister had directed his officials to enter into discussions with C&C. What action did the Government take to prevent the closure? Does the Taoiseach condone the conduct of the company? Will he tell the company that its conduct is absolutely unacceptable? Does he agree that it is socially irresponsible for a company to take a decision that has the effect of devastating a town? As I stated, the company is supported significantly by Enterprise Ireland. Will the Taoiseach now intervene, even at this late stage, to save these jobs?

The Taoiseach:   The Deputies from Tipperary raised this matter with the Minister for Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation, Deputy Richard Bruton, earlier today as a topical issue with the authorisation of the Ceann Comhairle. The Minister answered questions on this for the Deputies concerned.

It is always tough when a company decides to make a decision that involves taking jobs from a location or job losses. In this case, C&C has made the decision that the operations in Shepton Mallet and Borrisoleigh will be transferred to Clonmel, with an added investment of €10 million. This will include Bulmers, Magners, Tipperary Water and various niche beers and ciders. There is to be an expansion of the facility in Clonmel, bringing it to 75% capacity. That is tough on the workers in Borrisoleigh, which I understand. Obviously, if some of the workers in Borrisoleigh decide to work in Clonmel, they will have to travel a distance.

The Minister spoke to senior management at the company in recent days and urged it to reconsider its decision. However, it has made its decision and, unfortunately, it was not possible to hold the jobs in Borrisoleigh.

Enterprise Ireland will obviously continue to engage with the company on a range of issues associated with the marketing of the facility in Borrisoleigh. It is obviously not possible, in such a short period, to have a replacement facility put in place. While it is difficult for the workers involved directly, the closure comes at a time when 1,000 jobs have been created per week throughout the country. While it is no consolation today, I hope the marketing of the facility in Borrisoleigh will attract some other company such that it will set up there and provide gainful employment for the people in the area.

I note the company’s statement that it will continue to provide support and training for the workers who are affected. Clearly, all the supports from the State will be available also. The Minister for Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation, Deputy Richard Bruton, will continue to remain interested in this matter to determine what can be done following the company’s announcement. I thank Deputy Healy for raising the matter again.

Deputy Seamus Healy:   This closure comes on the back of job losses in Intellicom, Grant’s, Supervalu in Tipperary town, the Fairgreen supermarket in Carrick-on-Suir and Supervalu in Clonmel. The Government has forgotten Tipperary. Like the Minister earlier this afternoon, the Taoiseach has washed his hands of the situation in Borrisoleigh.

The number of unemployed in Tipperary, 13,000, is significantly higher than the national average. The rate is probably 13%. We have lost a net 321 IDA Ireland jobs in the past three years. Disposable income in Tipperary is 5% lower than the national average. The Government has deliberately excluded every town in Tipperary from IDA Ireland’s programme of building advance factories and offices.

I ask the Taoiseach again whether he will intervene to save the jobs. This is a totally unnecessary closure. Will he reverse the decision, which is a deliberate snub to Tipperary and deliberate discrimination against towns in the county? Every town in Tipperary has been excluded from IDA Ireland’s proposal to build advance factories and advance offices. The Government took this decision. Will it reverse it now and ensure Borrisoleigh gets an advance factory?

The Taoiseach:   The Deputy is now asking me a different question.

Deputy Seamus Healy:   It is the same question.

The Taoiseach:   Obviously, the Government has set out a proposal to have the areas outside the main urban areas become more attractive for investment and support, through Enterprise Ireland’s local enterprise offices, to deal with small and medium enterprises exporting from the country.

With respect, circumstances would be different if the company were to close down completely, with the loss of all the investment and jobs. I recall many occasions in the west when some of the bigger firms closed, with the loss of 1,000 jobs, thus causing economic devastation, yet it is peculiar how many small new enterprises can grow from this.

I understand C&C has made its decision and will not reverse it. It will expand in Clonmel, with an additional investment of €10 million and the creation of 80 additional jobs. The first option will be given to workers from Borrisoleigh who might wish to travel there. Obviously, they will have the option of travelling together in pooled groups, if that is their choice.

While news such as this is very tough on workers, the investment is not lost to Tipperary. As I said, the opportunity exists in so many other places where, for whatever reason, companies either consolidate or move. Thus, an opportunity could present itself to another company to set up in Borrisoleigh, hopefully to provide gainful employment.

I will refer the request in respect of IDA Ireland plants to the Minister for Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation. IDA Ireland has its own programme, and it has set out for the coming years a series of planned investments in greenfield plants, which I am sure will be very attractive to companies from all over Europe and beyond. While it is a tough day for the workers in Borrisoleigh, those who wish to travel to Clonmel will have the first option on the 80 positions that will become available there. I hope the entity can be marketed as a suitable location for other employment.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Repossessions/Evictions Must Be Stopped—Seamus Healy TD

56 Court Orders for Repossession of Tipperary homes were granted from Jan to September this year according to the Courts Service and further orders have been granted since then.

There must be a complete freeze on repossessions/evictions until the housing and homelessness crisis is solved.

Government Banks —PTSB, EBS and AIB owned by the state, sought the eviction of 62 householders At Clonmel Circuit Court and at Nenagh Circuit Court in the month of November 2015. The number is up from 11 in six months, almost a six fold increase.  Another raft of repossessions is being sought in this month of December

The total number of repossessions being sought, when non-state owned banks are included is 162

The Labour/FG government, which owns the state banks, is seeking the repossession/eviction of 72 Tipperary families from their homes with the Nenagh List yet to come this month

Has the Labour/FG government given the go ahead to state owned banks to seek widespread repossessions the modern equivalent of the battering ram! Clearly they have. They must be stopped

The total no of cases has increased in Clonmel from 41 in April to 75 in November -Repossession applications have almost doubled in 6 months. A similar increase is taking place at Nenagh Circuit Court. The predicted Tsunami in repossessions is now in full flow.

Thousands (25%) are surrendering their homes without going to court because of sustained pressure from the Banks.

The numbers in emergency accommodation are rocketing 

This is only the tip of the iceberg as most “emergency accommodation” is being provided by kind relatives.

I am calling for a halt to all repossession of dwelling houses immediately. The emergency situation in housing and homelessness must be urgently addressed by government.

 

Seamus Healy T.D.

56 Queen Street

Clonmel

Tel 087 2802199

 

 

Budget Statement By Seamus Healy TD   087-2802199

https://www.facebook.com/Seamus-Healy-TD-General-Election-Campaign-Page-1609542575973345/

Another Budget For The Rich as Water Charges and Home Taxes Continue

Provision for Housing, Education and Health Grossly Inadequate

Budget Statement By Seamus Healy TD   087-2802199

In my Dáil Statement( In Full Below) I said:” This is the fifth budget in a row for the rich and powerful in our society. The USC package gives the top 5% of earners, 110,000 individuals earning over €180,000, an additional €922, costing the Exchequer almost €100 million or nearly twice what they were given last year. In contrast a low-paid worker on €18,000 gets a paltry €124 per year and someone on €25,000 gets a paltry €247 a year. An old age pensioner will get €3 a week or €156 a year, about one sixth of what a person on €180,000 is getting.”

And households, even the most needy, will be required to pay water charges and LPT on their homes.

Minister Noonan, in an RTE interview, attempted to imply that the giveaway to the richest and the paltry concessions to those on low and middle incomes was an inevitable consequence of the tax system itself. This is entirely untrue. In its budget submission, the Irish Congress of Trade Unions gave the Minister a mechanism through which a tax giveaway to the very rich could have been avoided. The ICTU formula of a special USC tax credit for those individuals earning less than 70,400( 140,800 for a  couple) would have given much needed relief to those on low and middle incomes without wasting resources on the very rich.

Already Social Justice Ireland and Fr Sean Healy had advocated a similar tax credit policy and pointed out that the poorest 10% are paying a higher proportion of their own income in tax than the richest 10%. This budget will make this situation worse.

The tax policy to be implemented in the budget is a studied and deliberate plan to benefit the rich. Minister Noonan in his speech made it clear that this is just a first step. He promised if re-elected to give further tax relief to the rich by reducing the marginal tax rate for those on the highest incomes by 2%. This would give over 100 million to the top 10,000 on average incomes of 595,000Euro  per year or over  10,000 per week each and hundreds of millions to the top 5%.

Small Increase in Funding for Housing, Health and Education is totally inadequate to reverse the deep cuts implemented by this and the previous government.

The demands of the Irish National Teachers Organisation, the second level unions and the educational community in general have again not been met in the budget. Obviously, any reduction in class sizes will be helpful but at 27:1 ratio at primary level, it is still far too high and not good enough. There is no increase in the funding for capitation to schools and Youthreach centres. There is no restoration of vital assistant principal posts and ex-quota guidance counsellors and additional supports for principals. No provision has been made for hours allowances for teaching principals to do administration work.

These measures are all absolutely essential if our young people are to get a good quality education.

The Minister, Deputy Brendan Howlin, seems to have conveniently forgotten the facts in the health area. We lost 11,000 staff and €4 billion during the course of the recession. The restoration of cuts in this budget is minimal and our health service will remain totally inadequate as our nurses are pointing out every day.

Seamus Healy TD     087-2802199.

FULL BUDGET SPEECH   Dáil Record    Seamus Healy TD

Deputy Seamus Healy:   This is the fifth budget in a row for the rich and powerful in our society. The USC package gives the top 5% of earners, 110,000 individuals earning over €180,000, an additional €922, costing the Exchequer almost €100 million or nearly twice what they were given last year. In contrast a low-paid worker on €18,000 gets a paltry €124 per year and someone on €25,000 gets a paltry €247 a year. An old age pensioner will get €3 a week or €156 a year, about one sixth of what a person on €180,000 is getting.

This so-called recovery is a recovery for the rich and powerful in this society. It is a recovery for the rich on the backs of low-paid and middle income earners and social welfare recipients. It again widens the gap between rich and poor. It is thoroughly unfair and shameful.

Worse still, the Minister for Finance, Deputy Michael Noonan, told us that he will reduce the marginal tax rate for the very wealthiest in this society by 2 percentage points, giving them an effective bonanza, that is, if he is returned to office after the general election. He will reduce the marginal tax rate for these people from 52% to 50%, which is shameful. There is no wealth tax in the budget, even though the financial assets of the very wealthiest in the country are now €25 billion higher than they were at the height of the boom. It is a shameful sin of omission and one that must and should be reversed immediately.

The Minister for Public Expenditure and Reform, Deputy Brendan Howlin, seems to have selective memory. He referred to various promises made during the course of the last general election campaign. However, he conveniently forgets the ones that referred to “Labour’s way or Frankfurt’s way”. They planned to burn the bondholders, not another cent was to be given to the banks and we were to have a democratic revolution. He also forgot the six promises in the Labour Party’s “Tesco” advertisement. I do not have time to go into them all this evening but each and every one of them was broken by the Labour Party and the Government, including the introduction of water charges; the introduction of local property tax; the increase in the rate of VAT; the increase in the rate of DIRT; and the reduction in child benefit which was absolutely shameful for the Labour Party, a party that claims to have the views of James Connolly.

On public service pensions, the Minister is retaining €95 million of the €125 million pension money lodged in the Exchequer but owned by public servants. Many of these people are on very modest pensions while we are giving huge money to the richest and most powerful in our society, who have absolutely no constitutional entitlement to it.

The demands of the Irish National Teachers Organisation and the educational community in general have again not been met in the budget. Obviously, any reduction in class sizes will be helpful but at 27:1, it is far too high and not good enough. There is no increase in the funding for capitation. I do not see any support for principals or the restoration of assistant principal posts and ex-quota guidance counsellors. No provision has been made for hours allowances for teaching principals to do administration work. These are absolutely essential if our young people are to get a good quality education.

The Minister, Deputy Brendan Howlin, seems to have conveniently forgotten the facts in the health area. We lost 11,000 staff and €4 billion during the course of the recession. They have not been restored.

Kelly Challenged on Affordable Student Accomodation for Tipps

UCD Students’ Union President hits out at “unresponsive” Minister Alan Kelly

Op-Ed by Marcus O’Halloran, President of UCD Students’ Union and Tipperary native for Tipperary Times. UCD Students’ Union is the largest students’ union in Ireland.

The accommodation crisis in the student market is not a Dublin city issue, it’s a national issue. Nothing could be clearer to me as a Tipp native from a strong rural background. The fact is lack of affordable beds for students in Dublin impacts hardest on young people based outside that county – on students from Tipperary, Cavan & Longford. They’re generally not familiar with the Dublin market and they’ve a long and pricey commute if they’re unsuccessful in finding somewhere to stay.

As such, it’s a shocking disgrace that Alan Kelly, Minister for the Environment & TD for my own constituency in Tipperary, won’t schedule a meeting on student accommodation with students’ union representatives. His Cabinet role gives him special responsibility on housing. His job at both a national level and a constituency level means that housing for students should be a priority issue. However, in spite of those facts, he refuses to meet with representatives to discuss the issue.

His unresponsiveness is not particular to UCD Students’ Union but extends even to the Office of An Tánaiste Joan Burton— as, following a request on my part earlier this summer, Joan Burton’s Office asked for arrangements to be made for a meeting with Alan Kelly on the current student housing crisis. While I am unaware of whether a response was made to the Tánaiste herself, I do know her instructions were not acted upon and that there wasn’t even the vague promise of a meeting issued by Alan Kelly’s Office following her correspondence.

It’s unclear why it is this difficult to meet with Minister Alan Kelly on a national issue he is tasked with tackling. There are over 80,000 students attending college in Dublin from all parts of this country, including a significant contingent from Tipperary. They are being priced out of the rental market because young families & young professionals can’t afford to buy a house. There is a severe shortage of purpose-built student accommodation and rates are climbing in the centre, Dublin South and around the close-commuter belt. As a result, many students will be forced to make long, daily journeys in from counties like Tipperary following a housing scramble in August and September.

Preliminary reports released this week from the Higher Education Authority suggest this situation could continue for the next 10 years unless the Government takes decisive action. As President of the largest Students’ Union in the country, representing 30,000+ students, I would very much like to co-operate on plotting out the quickest, feasible course of action. Or, at least, to be assured that one is being planned to come into effect for the near future.

As it stands, I’m being met with a blank wall that even the Tánaiste couldn’t help me climb over. Perhaps the most frustrating part is that Alan Kelly was one of a number of politicians clamouring to praise young voters following May 22nd and marriage equality. He was one of several prominent Labour Party members to praise younger citizens for their part in the referendum victory. While I wouldn’t question his sincerity on the day, it’s important the Minister realize there truly is a large amount of newly registered 18-24 year olds in his constituency— they are worth talking to and meeting on issues which affect their future like lack of affordable housing.

He can continue to ignore the

Fianna Fáil Adds 2 candidates for Tipperary Constituency Seamus Healy TD Ready for Battle! FROM TIPPFM-News “Fianna Fáil have now selected three candidates to contest a seat in Tipperary for the upcoming General Election In a surprise move the party added two more names to the ticket – Councillors Siobhán Ambrose(Clonmel) and Michael Smith(Roscrea) They will run alongside Jackie Cahill(Thurles) when the country goes to the polls At the end of May former ICMSA president and first time councillor Jackie Cahill was selected to run for Tipp Fianna Fáil – seeing off his nearest competitor and fellow councillor Michael Smith by over 70 votes. In some quarters, Councillor Smith- son of the former Defence Minister – had been seen as the heir apparent to help Fianna Fail’s recovery from their 2011 wipe-out and his failure to succeed at selection convention posed a problem There was widespread speculation that the party would then add a second candidate -probably a South Tipp female representative like Siobhan Ambrose who was also a selection convention hopeful. Yesterday evening Fianna Fail HQ confirmed that following a meeting of the National Constituencies Committee the party would be running two more candidates -both Councillor Ambrose and Councillor Smith. Tipp Fm understands the move has caused considerable disquiet in some quarters after assurances where given from high up the party chain that Jackie Cahill would run a solo campaign North of Thurles” From Paddy Healy Fianna Fáil have now added Cllr Michael Smith(Roscrea) and Cllr Siobhán Ambrose (Clonmel) FF now have 3 candidates-Jackie Cahill (Thurles), Michael Smith(Roscrea) , Siobán Ambrose(Clonmel). It has no sitting TD. There are 6 other sitting TDs for 5 seats! SF recently selected Cllr Seamus Morris(Nenagh). The portion of Co Tipperary North of Nenagh up to Portumna bridge is now gone into Co Offally constituency. In addition a significant number of people from the old Tipperary South Riding Co Council Area which were in the old North Tipp Dáil constituency will now have the option to vote for South Tipperary based General Election Candidates for the first time for many years. Candidates  Declared Ambrose, Siobhán Cllr   (FF)     Clonmel Cahill, Jackie                  (FF)        Thurles Coonan Noel TD            (FG)       Roscrea Hayes Tom   Minister   (FG)       Cashel Healy Seamus TD          (WUA)    Clonmel Kelly Alan   Minister      (Lab)     Nenagh Lowry Michael TD         (IND)    Holycross, Thurles McGrath Mattie TD        (IND)   Newcastle, Cahir Morris Seamus Cllr           (SF)     Nenagh Smith Michael  Cllr            (FF)    Clonakenny, Roscrea Hoffman, Caroline             (Ind)     Roscrea Seamus Healy TD Replies to Coonan on Jobs–Deputy Coonan and his \\\fine \gael and \labour colleagues are putting the protection of the wealth of the super-rich above the provision of jobs and services to citizens Twice recently Deputy Noel Coonan has accused me of negativity and of having no proposals for jobs in Co. Tipperary

Interestingly he did not deny that; * The unemployment rate in Tipperary is 18.5% almost double the national average * There was a nett loss of 321 IDA jobs in the County over the 3 years to 21/12/2014 * Not a single Tipperary town was included in his government’s decision to provide advance factories and offices in towns around the Country * Tipperary is not getting its fair share of jobs, the vast majority of jobs are being created on the East Coast, Cork and Limerick These are the uncomfortable facts showing that Tipperary is being forgotten by Deputy Coonan and his government. I confess to advocating in the Dáil that; * Tipperary needs its fair share of IDA investment * Tipperary needs more investment in house building * Tipperary needs more investment in roads and infrastructure * Tipperary needs restoration of the €15 million cut to leader funding for the County I hope this is not too negative! I have also indicated clearly in the Dáil where the money can be found for this investment. In the last budget, Deputy Coonan voted to give €80 million in tax relief to 108,000 people who have average personal incomes of €180,000 per year. The top 10,000 of these have average incomes of €595,000 per year. I advocate that instead of giving money back to these super rich people who have total income of 20 billion per year, the 80 million should be withheld and a further higher rate of tax should be imposed on these super rich people to fund job creation and necessary public spending. Official statistics prove that the policies being pursued by Deputy Coonans government have ensured that both the assets and incomes of the super-rich have increased during the recession while the low and middle income families have been crucified. The wealth, assets and incomes, of the super-rich is now above the peak levels of the celtic tiger era. Much of this wealth is completely untaxed. The problem is that Deputy Coonan and his Fine Gael and Labour Party colleagues are putting the protection of the wealth of the super-rich above the provision of jobs and services for citizens. Worse still Tipperary is not getting it’s fair share of the national cake. Seamus Healy T.D. 087-2802199 07/07/15 ——————————————————————————————————————- Press Statement – Pressure Works. Healy Welcomes Cashel Jobs Deputy Seamus Healy has welcomed the announcement that a tenant has been found for the state of the art former Johnson & Johnson Plant at Cashel. This announcement proves that pressure works. I raised this issue on the floor of the Dáil with Richard Bruton T.D., Minister for Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation last February following which there was an announcement by Minister Tom Hayes. I continued the pressure and again last week put down another question to the Minister. Today’s announcement is a significant boost for the town of Cashel and surrounding area and I look forward to the opening of the plant without delay. Seamus Healy T.D. 7/7/2015 Tel 087 2802199 ———————————————————————————————————————————————–

Loss of Jobs at Grants Compounds Unemployment Crisis in Clonmel and in County Tipperary The announcement of 50 job losses at Grants Clonmel is a cruel blow to the workers and their families. Statement by Seamus Healy TD    0872802199 It represents a worsening of the unemployment crisis in Clonmel and County Tipperary generally. It follows the loss of 200 jobs at Intellicom Clonmel, the loss of 12 jobs at Gleesons (C&C) Borrisoleigh and a further 20 jobs in C&C administration and sales.   There have also been redundancies at Boston Scientific while the state of the art Johnson and Johnson plant at Cashel remains idle. There are 14,000 people unemployed in the County, way above the unemployment rate in Ireland as a whole. Unemployment increased by almost a hundred in Clonmel in April and by 383 in County Tipperary at a time when the figures nationally were decreasing. Not a cent of the €150 million to be spent by the government in IDA advance factories and offices in Ireland over the next five years is to be spent in County Tipperary. I have raised this issue directly with Minister Bruton, Minister for Jobs, on the floor of the Dáil. I pointed out that a nett 321 IDA supported jobs have been lost in County Tipperary over the last 3 years and that all County Tipperary towns have been excluded  from IDA supported advance factories and offices over the next 5 years. The Minister refused point blank to remedy this. I also objected to the €15 million euro cut in Leader Funds  for tipperary by Minister Alan Kelly. I warned that this would cost jobs. Now following the job losses at Intellicom, Grants and Gleesons ,I have put further questions down to Minister Bruton and I will also be meeting Grants management on Friday morning. It is now time for Minister Tom Hayes and Minister Alan Kelly to intervene with Minister Richard Bruton to ensure that Tipperary gets its fair share of job creation. The people of Clonmel and County Tipperary pay the same taxes as other Irish citizens and we demand our fair share of job creation funds. Seamus Healy TD   087-4183732 HSE Deprives Public of Quality Radiology Service At Soth Tipp General HospitalSeamus Healy TD     Ministers Alan Kelly and Tom Hayes Must Act NOW!!! The South Tipperary Public are being deprived of quality radiology service by the failure of the Health Service Executive to build up to date accommodation and install modern C.T. scanning equipment at South Tipperary General Hospital. This necessary development was announced and funding approved in 2014 with a start date of Spring 2015 and completion date of November 2015. A sod has not been turned yet and indeed the work has not even gone to tender. The work will provide accommodation for a new scanner with shell accommodation at the 1st floor. Despite full co-operation by staff at the hospital the work has still not commenced or indeed gone to tender. There is a particular urgency about his development as the existing scanner because of age – 13 years – and is prone to breakdowns and patients are being deferred and in some cases transferred. The HSE must immediately fast track this development and provide a quality service to the people of South Tipperary. Seamus Healy T.D. 087-2802199 16/6/15 Sewerage Blockages Causing Huge Distress-   MINISTER KELLY MUST ACT NOW!!

Press Statement     Seamus Healy TD   Irish Water refusal to clean sewerage blockages is causing huge distress and financial cuts to individuals and families across the County. Prior to the establishment of Irish Water, local authorities cleared sewerage blockages on a prevention and emergency basis. Irish Water now claim that it is no longer responsible for this. The result is that on a daily basis, we have sewerage backing up into houses, gardens and public faeces creating public health nuisance distress to families and financial cuts. Most of these cases are ongoing recurring problems which in the past were dealt with by the Local Council on a prevention basis. Again most of the sewers were laid by local Councils or contractor acting on behalf of local Councils. Sewerage coming into showers, bathrooms, gardens and public places cannot be allowed continue. This is unacceptable and inhuman. Despite repeated calls to local and national level Irish Water and the government have refused to take responsibility for clearing the sewerage blockages. I have raised this issue on the floor of the Dáil asking the Minister responsible Alan Kelly T.D. to solve this problem once and for all. These pleas have fallen on deaf ears. Minister Kelly, the Minister responsible for Irish Water must now instruct Irish Water to clear these blockages, as a matter of policy. Seamus Healy T.D. 087-2802199 15/6/15

TIPPERARY FORGOTTEN BY GOVERNMENT AS UNEMPLOYMENT RISES AS UNEMPLOYMENT FELL IN THE COUNTRY AS A WHOLE IT INCREASED IN COUNTY TIPPERARY! BUT GOVT DOESN’T FORGET TO COLLECT WATER TAX AND  LPT Statement  Seamus Healy TD   087-2802199 UNEMPLOYMENT INCREASE OF  380 in CO TIPPERARY! NO RECOVERY IN CO TIPPERARY TIPPERARY ABANDONED BY GOVERNMENT!     OUTRAGEOUS!!! 14,000 Unemployed in County National Unemployment Numbers Down but UNEMPLOYMENT INCREASES in CO TIPP –Live Register Register(CSO) Last February I raised with Richard Bruton , Minister for Jobs, in the Dáil the exclusion of all CO  Tipperary towns and locations from the Government Plan for Jobs. Not 1 cent of 150 million to be spent on IDA advance factories and offices to be spent in Ireland over the next five years is to be spent in Co Tipperary!!! I pointed out that  a net 321 IDA  jobs were lost in Tipp over the last 3 years I pointed out that 94% of all jobs created last year were in the Dublin area I pointed out that Disposable income in Co Tipp was 5% below the national average and 16% below that in Dublin I called for a fair share of the IDA fund For Co Tipp. I sought more spending on roads, house building and other infrastructure in the county                                  I got no satisfaction Then I issued a public statement asking Ministers Kelly and Hayes to intervene and to STOP THE NEGLECT of Co Tipperary. (THIS IS carried below) I objected to the 15million cut in Leader Funding for TIPP by Minister ALAN KELLY. I opposed the downgrading of our Post Offices in the Dáil. BUT NOTHING WAS DONE! NOW WE HAVE THIS AWFUL RESULT FOR TIPPERARY FAMILIES THIS NEGLECT IS OUTRAGEOUS. Tipperary is EXCLUDED FROM ECONOMIC RECOVERY Now another 43,000 Euro per year is being taken out of the county by closing The Lone Parent Support centre in Clonmel. Nevertheless, citizens of TIPP are being asked to pay Water TAXES and Local Property Taxes. Extra money is flowing out of the county but less is flowing into the county MINISTERS KELLY AND HAYES MUST TAKE PERSONAL RESPONSIBILITY FOR THIS. THEY HAD DETAILED WARNINGS. Now I call on MINISTERS KELLY and HAYES TO INSIST THAT THE DETERIORATING EMPLOYMENT SITUATION IN CO TIPPERARY BE REMEDIED IMMEDIATELY. PROMISES ARE NO GOOD. ONLY ACTIONS WILL SUFFICE. TIPPERARY WANTS A FAIR SHARE OF IDA INVESTMENT TIPPERARY NEEDS MORE INVESTMENT IN HOUSE BUILDING TIPPERARY NEEDS MORE INVESTMENT IN ROADS TIPPERARY NEEDS RESTORATION OF CUTS TO LEADER FUNDING FOR RURAL AREAS.MINISTER  Kelly must Restore 15 million (over 50%) CUT. MINISTERS KELLY AND HAYES MUST MAKE IT HAPPEN FOR CO TIPPERARY NOW! Seamus Healy TD   087-2802199 Earlier This Year Statement by Seamus Healy TD     086-4183732    22/03/2015 Co Tipperary is being Forgotten! Ministers Kelly(Lab) and Hayes(FG) Must Act Now to Stop Tipp falling Further Behind! Disposable income per head in County Tipperary is more than 5% below the national average and more than 16% below the Dublin level. 94% of all net new jobs in 2014 were created in the Dublin region according to figures published by the Nevin Economic Research Institute last Thursday. The disposable income statistics were  issued last week by the Central Statistics Office (CSO). Disposable income is gross income less taxes and social welfare contributions. The lower the disposable income is, the poorer the family is. The statistics are for 2012 but the situation in Co Tipperary has probably deteriorated since then as there was a nett loss of 321 IDA jobs in the county over the last 3 years

County Tipperary languishes at number 12 in county disposable income league behind Dublin, Limerick, Cork , Kildare, Wicklow , Meath, Galway, Carlow, Waterford, Sligo and Louth. This shocking statistic underlines the urgent need for new job creation in the county. The Nevin Economic Research Institute revealed on Thursday last that 94% of all net new jobs created last year were in Dublin and it’s the commuter belt. In 2012 Dublin had disposable income which was 13% above the national average and over 16% above the Co Tipperary level. Clearly the gap is continuing to widen. There was a NET LOSS of 321 IDA JOBS In Co Tipp over last 3 years but the County Was  Excluded from provision of new advance factories or offices in the Government Plan For JOBS Minister Bruton Admitted to me in the Dail recently that only 2 (two) net jobs were provided by IDA in Co Tipperary in 2014!!!!! There were 64 new jobs and 62 job losses in the county. WORSE STILL-There was a net loss of 321 IDA Jobs in the county over the last 3 years. Yet the towns of County Tipperary were all omitted from the plan to spend 150 million euro on providing advance factories and offices to encourage inward investment in its plan for jobs issued yesterday!!! Despite repeated questions from me  in the Dáil recently Minister Bruton failed to give any assurance that any advance manufacturing and office facilities for incoming IDA supported industry would be built in any Co Tipperary location over the next five years. Ministers Kelly and Hayes must demand fundamental change in the Government Plan for Jobs so that advance factories and offices can be urgently built in the towns of Tipperary. The Labour/Fine Gael Government must not be allowed to forget and ignore the plight of Co Tipperary families! Seamus Healy TD   087-2802199

Research Notes-Facts and Figures For the County Leader Funding For Co Tipp http://www.noelcoonan.com/revised-allocations-for-tipperary-leader-companies/   All Tipp Figures Here Leader funding to be announced to-day    10 million for ALL TIPPERARY down 15 million on 2013 May 2013    North Tipperary LEADER Partnership will receive funding of €12,917,884 or( 13 million for North Tipperary ALONE) In this context the figure of 25 million for county Tipperary announced in May 2013 is correct is correct Yes It was !2.5 million for Tipperary South http://www.tipperarystar.ie/news/local-news/e1-86m-for-south-tipp-leader-projects-1-5135399

Disposable Income in Co Tipp Disposable income per Head by County http://www.cso.ie/en/releasesandpublications/er/cirgdp/countyincomesandregionalgdp2012/#.VQ0oVdKsWQE Order Dublin   22,011 Limerick  21326 Cork          19,704 Kildare      19658

Wicklow    19009
Meath   18898
Galway     18890Carlow     18670Waterford 18610

North Tipp     18563      fraction of state  95.4%   of Dublin  84.4 Sligo               18456 Louth              18445 All Tipp           18383 South Tipp     18202         fraction of state    93.5%   of Dublin   82.7% Leitrim              18096 State                 19468             Dublin   22011 All Tipp   12th                       Fraction of state  94.4%    of Dublin 83.6%   Drop in Disposable Income for Munster Counties from 2008 to 2012 The breakdown of figures for Munster show: – Clare €22,185 (–€4,623) down 17.2%. – Cork €24,832 (–€3,236) down 11.5%. – Kerry €21,134 (–€2,062) down 8.9%. – Limerick €26,590 (–€19) down 0.1%. – North Tipperary €22,351 (–€4,757) down 17.5%.  – South Tipperary €21,976 (–€4,192) down 16.0%. – Waterford €22,847 (–€3,597) down 13.6%. By contrast, Dublin’s average income fell 8.8% (€2,835) to €29,278. Update March 12, 2015 7001 Repossession Applications for  Homes before Courts. Stop The Evictions!-Seamus Healy TD Statement by Seamus Healy TD   087-2802199 From The Courts Service CIVIL BILLS (COURT APPLICATIONS) for Repossession of Homes by County

Civil Bills lodged 2014 County Total CB lodged Total Orders Granted Civil BillsLive  end  2014
Carlow Carlow 116 20 96
Carrick on Shannon Leitrim 75 21 54
Castlebar Mayo 206 37 169
Cavan Cavan 250 34 216
Clonmel Tipperary 341 48 293
Cork Cork 627 84 543
Dublin Dublin 1673 253 1420
Dundalk Louth 290 41 249
Ennis Clare 197 28 169
Galway Galway 421 9 412
Kilkenny Kilkenny 123 13 110
Letterkenny Donegal 386 13 373
Limerick Limerick 328 50 278
Longford Longford 100 23 77
Monaghan Monaghan 142 17 125
Mullingar Westmeath 226 13 213
Naas Kildare 453 48 405
Portlaoise Laois 226 46 180
Roscommon Roscommon 198 22 176
Sligo Sligo 121 6 115
Tralee Kerry 175 33 142
Trim Meath 607 43 564
Tullamore Offaly 173 40 133
Waterford Waterford 209 50 159
Wexford Wexford 331 38 293
Wicklow Wicklow 288 33 255
  8164 1063 7101

Over 1000 Tipperary Homes ARE TO BE REPOSSESSED OVER THE NEXT TWO YEARS!!                            THESE EVICTIONS MUST BE STOPPED!                   MINISTERS KELLY AND HAYES MUST ACT!  Tipperary is the 7th highest county for repossessions cases after Dublin, Cork, Galway Meath, Kildare, Donegal  but above Limerick and Waterford 36 Applications for Repossession are before Clonmel Circuit Court this week alone On the 31 Dec, 2014, the number of civil bills for repossession in Co Tipperary which were lodged in court by lenders was 341. Of these 293 were still proceeding on Jan 1,2015. (Courts Service see above) This makes Tipperary the 7th highest county for repossessions after Dublin, Meath, Kildare, Cork, Galway, Donegal  but above Limerick and Waterford   48 Tipperary Homes were repossessed last year according to figures for 2014 issued by the Courts Service recently.  Only 8 of these were “buy to let”. The Tipperary figure of 48 orders granted and 293 orders still in process were both over 4% of the national total.  But these figures are now to escalate dramatically. David Hall of the Irish Mortgage Holders Association has claimed (Irish Times March 9) that 25,000 homes will be repossessed over the next 2 years. This means that over 1000 Tipperary homes will be repossessed over the next two years. The increase in the price of houses is making it much more attractive for banks to repossess and sell-on homes and they are taking full advantage of government decisions. In the Dail last week, Labour and Fine Gael voted down a motion to remove veto power from banks in matters dealing with the family home. In Spring 2013, the Labour/Fine Gael Government passed  an amendment in the Dáil to allow banks to repossess homes after repossession orders were struck down by Justice Dunne in the High Court. Over 38,000 Irish households in mortgage distress cannot avail of the Personal Insolvency Service because they have insufficient disposable income! They must not be evicted. The veto given to banks by the government over the mortgage to rent scheme and other restructuring instruments must be removed immediately THE GOVERNMENT IS TOTALLY RESPONSIBLE FOR THE FORTHCOMING SPATE OF EVICTIONS!!! I am calling on Ministers Kelly and Hayes to insist that the government stops these evictions now! Seamus Healy TD 087-2802199        seamus.healy@oireachtas.ie Those threatened with repossession should contact the Irish Mortgage Holders Association lo call 1890 623 624 info@mortgageholders.ie or    Phoenix Project, Port Laoise   Ph 1850 20 30 40  Email: support@phoenixproject.ie or myself    Seamus Healy TD 087-2802199, Office 05261-21883        seamus.healy@oireachtas.ie UPDATE   FEB 10,2015 NET LOSS of 321 IDA JOBS In Co Tipp over last 3 years but County Excluded from Provision of New Advance Factories or Offices in Government Plan For JOBS Minister Bruton Admitted to Deputy Seamus Healy in Dail to-day, Feb 10, that only 2 (two) net jobs were provided by IDA in Co Tipperary in 2014!!!!! There were 64 new jobs and 62 job losses in the county. WORSE STILL-There was a net loss of 321 IDA Jobs in the county over the last 3 years. Yet the towns of County Tipperary were all omitted from the plan to spend 150 million euro on providing advance factories and offices to encourage inward investment in its plan for jobs issued yesterday!!!    Despite repeated questions from Deputy Healy  in the Dáil on Thursday morning , Minister Bruton failed to give any assurance that any advance manufacturing and office facilities for incoming IDA supported industry would be built in any Co Tipperary location over the next five years.

  • Deputy Healy pointed out that this would mean that the locations specified in the Ministers statement for such advance facilities (Sligo, Tralee, Castlebar, Galway, Dundalk, Limerick, Athlone, Carlow and Waterford) would have a huge advantage  over Co Tipperary in the location of new jobs and would compound the discrimination
  • against Co Tipperary over the past two years by IDA.

DEPUTY HEALY SAID: “The Minister’s announcement yesterday says nothing about towns in Tipperary. It talks about the investment over the coming years in building advance manufacturing and office facilities in Sligo, Tralee, Castlebar, Galway, Dundalk, Limerick, Athlone, Carlow and Waterford. There is no mention of any town in Tipperary or the building of advance factories or office facilities on any of the sites that are available throughout the county, in Tipperary town, Archerstown in Thurles, Lisboney in Nenagh, Benamore at Roscrea, Clonmel, Cashel or Carrick-on-Suir. It is quite obvious that there is no commitment to job creation for County Tipperary through IDA companies into the future. I want to see the plan the Minister announced yesterday amended to include County Tipperary specifically.” In 2013 while 202 new  were created  521 IDA JOBS WERE LOST IN THE COUNTY In 2014  only 16 new jobs were provided in North Tipp and 48 in South Tipp. There were 62 job losses giving a net gain of two  78% of all IDA Jobs were provided in Dublin,  Cork, and Limerick Extracts From Dáil Report Feb 12 Deputy Richard Bruton:   I assure the Deputy that every county, including Tipperary, is included in our regional strategy. No one is excluded. The annual employment survey shows that 68 jobs were created and 77 were lost among IDA client companies in Tipperary in 2012. In 2013, 202 jobs were created while 521 were lost, and in 2014, 64 jobs were created while 62 were lost Deputy Seamus Healy:   The Minister’s announcement yesterday says nothing about towns in Tipperary. It talks about the investment over the coming years in building advance manufacturing and office facilities in Sligo, Tralee, Castlebar, Galway, Dundalk, Limerick, Athlone, Carlow and Waterford. There is no mention of any town in Tipperary or the building of advance factories or office facilities on any of the sites that are available throughout the county, in Tipperary town, Archerstown in Thurles, Lisboney in Nenagh, Benamore at Roscrea, Clonmel, Cashel or Carrick-on-Suir. It is quite obvious that there is no commitment to job creation for County Tipperary through IDA companies into the future. I want to see the plan the Minister announced yesterday amended to include County Tipperary specifically.

  • Co Tipperary has been omitted from IDA plans to provide advance factories in the Jobs plan announced by Government yesterday
  • In his statement launching the plan the Minister said: “IDA Ireland will roll out a 5-year €150million capital investment programme to help attract more multinational jobs into each region. This programme will build on the recent investment by IDA in facilities in Athlone and Waterford, and will include investments over the coming years in building advance manufacturing and office facilities in Sligo, Tralee, Castlebar, Galway, Dundalk, Limerick, Athlone, Carlow and Waterford”
  • ——————————————————————–”

Taoiseach Increases Threat to 21 Nursing Homes in Dáil Reply The locations of the 21 Nursing Homes under Threat are carried below Taoiseach Increases Threat To Nenagh and Roscrea Nursing Homes Immediate Statement Required from Minister Kelly and Junior Minister Hayes   Statement From Seamus Healy TD  087-2802199   Taoiseach Enda Kenny, speaking in the Dáil to-day failed to give an assurance that any or all of the 21 homes which have “major compliance issues” would not be closed or phased out. These Include St Conlons, Nenagh and Dean Maxwells, Roscrea An immediate statement is needed from Minister Alan Kelly stating that he  will not tolerate the closure or phasing out of the two homes. It would be totally unacceptable if senior citizens were sent to Limerick or to Portlaoise Taoiseach Kenny said: “ The Government publicly supports and will continue to support a public nursing home service provided in public homes for people who avail of this service. They has never been enough money, nor is there enough now. What we must do is decide on the flexibility within the law, which homes can continue to give service for the time ahead and how best we can bring the other facilities up to the standard of modern nursing homes such that the people who use them can be comfortable and secure”. –  (Dail Report Tuesday Jan 20) He refused to say which homes will close Seamus Healy TD Seamus Healy TD had already raised the matter last Thursday at the Oireachtas Committee on Health and Children and sounded the alarm when Tony O’Brien, Head of HSE admitted that no money had been allocated to bring the 21 homes up to HIQA standards. This morning, Seamus Healy TD had issued the following statement:   Statement by Seamus Healy TD   Threat to Nursing Homes in Nenagh and Roscrea   Despite the excellent dedicated work of staff at St Conlon’s Community Nursing Unit, Nenagh and at Dean Maxwell Community Nursing Unit,Roscrea, these nursing units are among 21 public nursing homes threatened with sanctions up to and including closure. This is basically due to the failure of government to invest in upgrading the homes and a consequent finding of “major non-compliance” by inspecting body HIQA. Deputy Seamus Healy raised this issue at last Thursday’s meeting (15/1/2015) of the Oireachtas Health Committee. Deputy Healy demanded clarification of the position from Minister Varadkar and Tony O’Brien Director of the Health Service Executive. Mr O’Brien confirmed the seriousness of this issue when he said “The challenge for re-registration of public long-stay beds with HIQA is a significant issue to be dealt with over the coming months as there is insufficient capital funding available to meet all requirements and there are over 30 large units who provide in excess of 2,500 beds and where there is, currently, insufficient funding in the capital plan to bring this infrastructure to the required standard. “   Further detailed information was contained in the Sunday Business Post. Neither nursing home was identified in the HSE Service Plan for 2015 as projects that will secure capital investment in the coming year. HIQA said in its report “if a centre is not in compliance by July 1, 2015 and if no realistic, time-bound costed/funded plan has been agreed with the Authority, then appropriate conditions will be attached to any renewal of registration” In addition to closure, HIQA can impose conditions for continued operation which can include forcing nursing homes to reduce the number of residents or high-dependency patients they have. A HSE document leaked last year said that 300 millionEuro was required to upgrade public nursing units. But only 7.3 million is being allocated for the entire country this year in the HSE service plan. Neither of the two nursing homes was identified in the service plan for capital investment this year.     The neglect of these homes by government is unforgiveable. Capital investment must be provided immediately to these homes before July 1, 2015.   There is a particular obligation on Government politicians in Tipperary, including Ministers Kelly and Hayes, to insist that the HSE Service Plan be amended to include the required capital investment. Additional direct government funding must be allocated to secure the future of these units.   Seamus Healy TD   087-2802199   21 Public Nursing Homes in Danger of Closure or Phasing Out Tipperary (2)     Nenagh, Roscrea Clare(2)      Tuamgraney, Ennis Cork (6) Douglas Rd, Bantry, Bandon, Macroom, Millstreet, Castletownbere Waterford(1) Johns Hill Kerry (1)  Tralee Leitrim (1)   Mohill Wexford (1)  Gorey Cavan(2)  Lisdarn, Ballyconnell Louth (2)  Drogheda, Ardee Monaghan(1)   Rooskey Dublin (2)  Peamount, Leopardstown Park  Statement by Seamus Healy TD  Threat to Nursing Homes in Nenagh and Roscrea  Despite the excellent dedicated work of staff at St Conlon’s Community Nursing Unit, Nenagh and at Dean Maxwell Community Nursing Unit,Roscrea, these nursing units are among 21 public nursing homes threatened with sanctions up to and including closure. This is basically due to the failure of government to invest in upgrading the homes and a consequent finding of “major non-compliance” by inspecting body HIQA. Deputy Seamus Healy raised this issue at last Thursday’s meeting (15/1/2015) of the Oireachtas Health Committee. Deputy Healy demanded clarification of the position from Minister Varadkar and Tony O’Brien Director of the Health Service Executive. Mr O’Brien confirmed the seriousness of this issue when he said “The challenge for re-registration of public long-stay beds with HIQA is a significant issue to be dealt with over the coming months as there is insufficient capital funding available to meet all requirements and there are over 30 large units who provide in excess of 2,500 beds and where there is, currently, insufficient funding in the capital plan to bring this infrastructure to the required standard. “   Further detailed information was contained in the Sunday Business Post. Neither nursing home was identified in the HSE Service Plan for 2015 as projects that will secure capital investment in the coming year. HIQA said in its report “if a centre is not in compliance by July 1, 2015 and if no realistic, time-bound costed/funded plan has been agreed with the Authority, then appropriate conditions will be attached to any renewal of registration” In addition to closure, HIQA can impose conditions for continued operation which can include forcing nursing homes to reduce the number of residents or high-dependency patients they have. A HSE document leaked last year said that 300 millionEuro was required to upgrade public nursing units. But only 7.3 million is being allocated for the entire country this year in the HSE service plan. Neither of the two nursing homes was identified in the service plan for capital investment this year. The neglect of these homes by government is unforgiveable. Capital investment must be provided immediately to these homes before July 1, 2015.   There is a particular obligation on Government politicians in Tipperary, including Ministers Kelly and Hayes, to insist that the HSE Service Plan be amended to include the required capital investment. Additional direct government funding must be allocated to secure the future of these units.   Seamus Healy TD   087-2802199 Statement by Cllr Pat English, Workers and Unemployed Action           087-7684746 WUA Alone in Opposing Budget 2015 for Co Tipperary at Estimates Meeting Almost 33million Euro per year taken from Economy of Co Tipperary by FG/Lab Government since 2011 through reduction in annual General Purpose Grant to Local Authorities I proposed the rejection of the Budget for 2015 at the estimates meeting of Co Tipperary Co council. No councillor could be found to second the motion and all other councillors agreed the estimates. The budget for 2015 contains the extraction of an additional 12.245  million Euro out of the economy of Co Tipperary in the coming year. This is because Minister Kelly has replaced  more than half of government funding for the year by the proceeds of Local Property Tax collected from the citizens of Co Tipperary. I opposed these estimates because to do otherwise would be to agree to this large additional extraction of money from the people of Co Tipperary    As can be seen from the figures below, his government has  reduced government funding to Tipperary local authorities by almost 33 million or 75%  since  it came to power in 2011. This extraction by Alan Kelly’s government out of the economy of County Tipperary is a huge factor in depressing the local economy, keeping unemployment high and reducing demand to small businesses. North and South Tipp are in the highest regions of unemployment in Ireland according to official figures. The budget also provided money for JUNKETS (travel and maintenance for councillors at conferences at home and abroad). I proposed that this money be set aside for childrens’ playgrounds. This amendment was defeated by a large majority. The provision for junkets was contained in the final overall budget for which all councillors voted , except myself. On top of the property tax,  water charges are to be imposed from Jan 1,2015 This will extract even more money from the local economy causing further depression and crucifying already hard pressed people. According to the Nevin Economic Research Institute, the poorest 10% are paying a higher proportion of income in tax than the top 10%!i DOUBLE TAXATION WE are already paying for water and other local services, through general taxation, direct and indirect. Now we are being forced to pay a second time through these charges for services which have been reduced by government cuts. This money is being diverted to pay part of the 8 billion per year interest which recent governments have incurred through bailing out billionaire investors in bust banks. Local property Tax and Water Charges are devices to make the ordinary person pay for bailing out banks. Minister Noonan has informed the Dail that the top 10,000 income earners have 595,000 Euro per year EACH.  Financial assets of households (shares, bank deposits, insurance policies) are now back above peak boom levels at 334 billion Euro gross (CSO Institutional sector accounts). The wealthiest 300 Irish citizens have a total of 62 Billion Euro in Assets(Nick Webb, Sunday Independent)  Minister Kelly and his government should take the money from them and use it to abolish home and water taxes. Councillor Pat English, Workers and Unemployed Action      NOTES for Editors Total General Purpose Grant (GPG) To ALL Co Tipperary                             Local Authorities (Euro) YEAR                        2008                       2011                              2013                            2014                                2015 GPG Total               54,684,395             43,644,608                    38,271,37 2           22,755,110                       11,075,302 (Note)                                                                                                                                        Note      GPG =20% of 2008 Figure , GPG= 25%  of 2011 figure when current government came to power             The figure of 11,075,302 contains a net 1.25 million Euro received from the property tax national equalisation fund             Total  Local Property Tax Collected from households in Co Tipperary was  12.245 Million Euro MONEY EXTRACTED FROM CO Tipperary since 2008 through reduction of GPG,   54.684-11.075= 43.609 Million Euro MONEY EXTRACTED FROM CO Tipperary since 2011 through reduction of GPG,   43.645-11.075= 32.570 Million Euro The figure for General Purpose Grant given in the Budget 2015 by Tipperary Co Council is  23,320,100 Euro. But this figure contains the 12.245 million collected in property tax in Co Tipperary and an additional 1.25 million from the national property tax equalisation fund, money collected in property tax from more populous counties.    Seamus Healy TD Replies To Minister Alan Kelly in the Dáil on Water Charges  Hypocrisy And Cynicism Undermining Democracy   Minister Alan Kelly introduces Water Charges.   The irony and hypocrisy of today’s announcement introducing water charges by Labour Party Minister Alan Kelly T.D. will not be lost on the general public. During the last General Election Minister Kelly and the Labour Party asked the people of North Tipperary to vote for him to prevent Fine Gael imposing Water Charges. He stood on a Labour Party Manifesto which opposed Water Charges.  His Party published a “Tesco Ad” warning people not to vote for Fine Gael because that Party wanted to introduce Water Charges. He is now doing a complete U Turn, breaking the promises and commitments he and his party made. He is now introducing water charges himself. This is the sort of hypocrisy which is undermining our democracy. Labour Leader Joan Burton T.D., contrary to commitments and promises has presided over the destruction of social welfare services.  Child poverty is now at 28.6% with 130,000 additional children living in poverty, affected no doubt by the savage child benefit cuts introducedby Minister Burton. The list of other cuts include Respite Care Grant, abolition of Telephone Allowance, reduction in Free Fuel and Electricity Payments, reduction in Maternity Benefit and One Parent Family Payment, abolition of the Bereavement Grant and the list goes on. This Government, despite election promises, are now implementing the austerity policies of the previous Fianna Fáil/Green Government. This Government cannot be trusted and has no mandate for austerity or for the introduction of water charges. The lie is being peddled that the public won’tpay for water.   But the public have paid,  are paying and continue to pay for water through general taxation. The water charges now being proposed aredouble taxation and are an attempt to make hard-pressed families pay a second time. IT WON’T WORK Today’s announcements amount to political trickery to get the water charges across the line and establish the principle of charging for water at any cost. Once Water Charges are established, water will become a commodity and charges will rise to full cost recovery under EU law. Tooday’s announcements amount to the “thin end of the wedge”,  “casting out a sprat to catch a salmon”, “ a supermarket loss leader”,   “come into my parlour said the spider to the fly”. The public know that this is a trap and will not be fooled. The Public knows that Water Charges introduced at a low level will, like refuse/bin charges balloon to significant sums. What did happen with Bin Charges?? I was a member of Clonmel Corporation when Bin Charges were introduced at the minimal rate of £5 per year.  I opposed those charges as the thin end of the wedge that would in time hit hard pressed families. I was of course ridiculed by Fianna Fáil, Fine Gael and Labour Councillors. One Councillor threw a box of matches across the table at me saying the charges are only the cost of a box of matches a week. But what happened? Bin Charges are now €300 per year, more than 30 times the introductory “offer”; the waiver for low income families has been abolished and the service has been privatised. That is the future if we allow the introduction of water charges.  The public know that and they will not be sold a pup, like they were by the Labour Party in the 2011 General Election. Families have had enough after 6 years of austerity and this hated water charge is the straw that breaks the camel’s back. Water is a human right, a public good that must not be commodified, commercialised or privatised.It is the responsibility of the State to protect the public’s right to safe, secure accessible and affordable water. Water is a human right and a public good and must not be turned into a profit making opportunity for National or Multinational Corporations. Promises of legislation to prevent privatisation are simply that …”promises”  from a government that cannot be trusted. Proposed legal changes to cap charges for a number of years, to make it more difficult to privatise Irish Water or to require a plebiscite are completely bogus.  Any Act can be repealed or amended by a simple majority of deputies. A Legal provision to require a two thirds majority or even a 100% agreement to privatise Irish Water can be repealed by a simple majority. Such a proposal is pure deception. If the government was sincere on this issue, it would agree to a constitutional amendment. The Public know that only People Power can abolish water charges and secure the status of water as a human right and a public good. The most important task now is for the “Risen People” to turn out in huge numbers for the National Protest in Dublin on 10th December next and in Tipperary to support the Nenagh March next Saturday 22 Nov at 2pm and the Clonmel March on Saturday 29th November at 2pm. Seamus Healy T.D.                                                                                         19/11/2014 Tel 087 2802199 Deputy Mattie McGrath tells Local Radio that he supports Water Charges, supports Metering and will Pay the Water ChargesStatement by Seamus Healy TD   Workersand Unemployed Action   Yet again Deputy McGrath is “running with the hare and hunting with the hounds” He has now made clear in an interview on Tipp FM that he supports water charges, supports metering and will pay the water charges himself. Deputy McGrath has been pretending to oppose water charges and trying to use the water charges protests as a bandwagon for himself. But he let the cat out of the bag on Thursday last, 6 November, when he told Tipp Today “I am in favour of a charge for water…..” and again “I am in favour of metering…” Earlier in the interview he describes water as a “commodity” and confirmed that he will pay the water charges. Clearly Deputy McGrath is now supporting this government’s attempts to bring in the hated water charges, another austerity tax on hard pressed families. Deputy McGrath knows well that as soon as charges are in place for domestic water, it will become a commodity under European Law and all restrictions on state aid will then apply. This means that however low the initial charge, households will eventually pay the full price for production and delivery of water. This will be in addition to the money we are already paying through general taxation for water – paying a second time. Deputy McGrath and the Labour Party are now, also, using the proposal for a referendum on privatisation as a smokescreen for the introduction of water charges. The People of Tipperary will ignore the smokescreens and will keep up the pressure for the abolition of these hated water charges. The next protest in Clonmel will be on Saturday 29th November and the next national protest will be in Dublin on the 10th December. (Extracts from the Tipp FM interview and a link to the actual interview are attached below) Seamus Healy T.D. 087 2802199 14 minutes in to Tipptoday hour 2, Thursday, November 6,2014 http://tippfm.podomatic.com/entry/2014-11-06T03_30_45-08_00 Extracts From Interview with Séamus Martin on Tipptoday Seamus Martin: Are You Going to Pay the Water Charges? Mattie McGrath TD: Seamus, if I get a bill and I am an elected representative to Dáil Éireann I have to  pay, I can’t break the law. Seamus Martin: There are other elected TDs, notably Seamus Healy TD, the Sinn Féin TDs and the socialist TDs who say they will break the law and they won’t pay it Mattie McGrath: Yes that’s their choice and their right to do—but I believe and always have believed that water is a valuable commodity——- Seamus Martin; When it comes to paying for all this, water charges, are you in favour of water being paid for directly or through indirect taxation? Mattie McGrath: It has to be paid for , one way or the other, it has to be paid for Seamus Martin: Which one would you favour Mattie McGrath: I am in favour of metering because I am in favour of conservation—  —— Seamus Martin: So you are in favour of the charge? Mattie McGrath: I am in favour of A charge for water and I have to be honest there because water is a costly commodity to produce ————– Government Story That the Country is Broke is a Lie Speech of Seamus Healy TD on Finance Bill 2014 Séamus Healy (Tipperary South, Independent) This Finance Bill, the budget and general Government policy is based on spin, hype and, indeed, the Government’s lie that this country is broke. Michael Kitt (Galway East, Fianna Fail, Acting Ceann Comhairle)) The Deputy cannot use that word. Please withdraw it now. Séamus Healy (Tipperary South, Independent) If the Government does not like that word, let us call it something else. Peter Mathews (Dublin South, Independent) Untrue. Michael Kitt (Galway East, Fianna Fail) It is not allowed under standing orders. Peter Mathews (Dublin South, Independent) Use the French word mensonge. Séamus Healy (Tipperary South, Independent) It is completely untrue that this country is broke. Michael Kitt (Galway East, Fianna Fail) I take it that the Deputy is withdrawing that. Séamus Healy (Tipperary South, Independent) The policies that follow from that and which are being implemented by this Government mean continued austerity for ordinary people. They mean continued austerity for low and middle-income families whom this Government are forcing to pay for a recession that they had no hand, act nor part in creating. The water charge is one of those austerity taxes, but ordinary people are now saying that they have had enough. It is the straw that breaks the camel’s back. The policies in the budget and in the Finance Bill ensure that the gap between rich and poor has increased. The policies mean that the super-rich get off scot free and will not even be asked to pay their fair share of taxation. In recent days, the Minister’s press officer boasted in the newspapers that anyone earning over €100,000 a year will get €747 from this budget. That is nearly €15 per week, while the lowest earners get 90 cent per week. Low and middle-income families will face more austerity, while the very wealthy get support and are not asked to pay for anything. We have high unemployment levels while there are over 100,000 on the housing waiting lists and there is a huge mortgage crisis. Irish children have fallen further and faster into poverty than in any other OECD country. It is shameful that 28.6% of Irish children currently live in poverty. We also have high emigration, including 84,000 graduates who have left this country in recent years. They are now contributing to economies in Canada, Australia and elsewhere. Ordinary people know that our health and education services have been devastated. This country is not broke, however. All objective, independent analysis agrees that this is a very wealthy country indeed. Of course, the wealth is skewed in favour of wealthy people to such an extent that the poorest 10% pay more as a percentage of their income in tax than the wealthiest 10%. That is another absolutely shameful situation. About 12 months ago in this Chamber, the former Minister of State, Deputy Joe Costello, told us that this was the eighth richest country in the world. That fact has been supported by objective analysis. We know, for instance, that the gross domestic product here per head of population is greater than in Germany, France or the United Kingdom. That finding has been supported by Germany’s Bertelsmann Foundation in recent times. The German study shows that, despite being one of the richest countries in the EU, Ireland’s rating for distribution of wealth is 18th, in the bottom third of the 28 EU countries, along with Greece, Bulgaria, Romania and Latvia. As a result of the study, the foundation also cited Ireland as an example of how high GDP per capita did not translate automatically into social justice for the population. Ireland has a GDP around as high as Sweden’s, but ranks considerably below average when it comes to social justice and is one of the biggest losers in country comparisons. This country is very wealthy, but the wealth is in the hands of a very small percentage of the population that is not being asked to pay its fair share. Less than 12 months ago, the Minister for Finance told me that the top 10,000 income earners in the country earn €595,000 each per year. From the rich list published in the Sunday Independent by Nick Webb, we know the 300 wealthiest people in the country have increased their assets and income from €50 billion in 2010 to €62 billion, an increase of €12 billion. We know the financial assets of the wealthy are now at the level of the Celtic tiger era, at €324 billion. It is time the Government made very wealthy people pay their fair share. I am talking about seriously wealthy people, not the ordinary individual with a redundancy payment or a retirement lump sum or who bought a house for retirement. I am talking about people with huge amounts of money, hundreds of millions or billions of euro each. They are not even asked to pay a wealth tax, which is one of the things the Government should do. It should introduce a wealth tax for very wealthy people, but I can see the Minister throwing his hands up in the air, as do the media and the establishment when people suggest it. We should remember there are six countries in the EU with a wealth tax. A wealth tax was introduced in this country by a former colleague of the Minister, Richie Ryan, but it was abolished by Fianna Fáil to suit its backers. A wealth tax is essential. Even a very small wealth tax would provide significant income, billions of euros, to address the issues of water, health and education services.

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